Posts tagged with "eating"

The app teaching anorexics to eat

More patients go into long-term remission by re-learning how to eat,
than through CBT or drugs

The Mandometer app connects to a weighing scale, and guides patients’ eating behavior by providing visual feedback. Redistributed under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 from J Vis Exp. 2018; (135): 57432.

Swedish scientists say that eating disorders should be considered just that – eating disorders, rather than mental disorders. The proof, they say, is in the eating.

“Anorexic patients can learn to eat at a normal rate by adjusting food intake to feedback from a smartphone app,” says Per Södersten, Professor at the Karolinska Institute and lead author of an article in Frontiers in Neuroscience defending his pioneering method. “And in contrast to failing standard treatments, most regain a normal body weight, their health improves, and few relapse.”

The approach is based on the theory that slow eating and excessive physical exertion, both hallmarks of anorexia, are evolutionarily conserved responses to short food supply that can be triggered by dieting – and reversed by practicing normal eating.

Which came first: the diet or the anorexia?

Attempts to treat anorexia as a mental illness have largely failed, claim the authors.

“The standard treatment worldwide, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), targets cognitive processes thought to maintain the disorder,” explains Södersten. “The rate of remission from eating disorders is at most 25% one year after CBT, with unknown outcomes in the long-term. Psychoactive drugs have proven even less effective.”

Instead, they say, we need to flip our perspective: to target eating behaviors that maintain dysfunctional cognitive processes.

“This new perspective is not so new: nearly 40 years ago, it was realized that the conspicuous high physical activity of anorexia is a normal, evolutionarily conserved response – i.e., foraging for food when it is in short supply – that can be triggered dietary restriction.

“In striking similarity to human anorexics, rats and mice given food only once a day begin to increase their running activity and decrease their food intake further to the point at which they lose a great deal of body weight and can eventually die.”

More recently, the theory has been elaborated and validated by studies of brain function.

“We find that chemical signaling in the starved brain supports the search for food, rather than eating itself,” reports Södersten.

How to eat

To prove that the evolutionary perspective works in practice, Södersten and his team have put their money where their (patient’s) mouth is. Their private clinics – which reinvest 100% of profits into research and development – are now the largest provider of eating disorders services in Sweden.

“We first proposed teaching anorexics to eat back in 1996. At the time, it was thought that this was misplaced and even dangerous; today, no-one can treat patients with eating disorders in the Region of Stockholm without a program for restoring their eating behavior.”

At the Mandometer clinics, the control of eating behavior is outsourced to a machine that provides feedback on how quickly to eat.

“Subjects eat food from a plate that sits on a scale connected to their smartphone. The scale records the weight loss of the plate during the meal, and via an app creates a curve of food intake, meal duration and rate of eating,” explains Södersten. “At regular intervals, a rating scale appears on the screen and the subject is asked to rate their feeling of fullness.”

“A reference curve for eating rate and a reference curve for the feeling of fullness are also displayed on the screen of the smartphone. The subject can thus adapt their own curves in real time to the reference curves, which are based on eating behavior recorded in healthy controls.”

Through this feedback, patients learn to visualize what normal portions of food look like and how to eat at a normal rate.

Satisfying results

The method has now been used to treat over 1500 patients to remission by practicing eating.

“The rate of remission is 75% in on average one year of treatment, the rate of relapse is 10% over five years of follow-up and no patient has died.”

This appears to be a vast improvement compared to the current best standard treatment of CBT. All the more so, considering that overall Södersten’s patients started off sicker than average.

“The difference in outcome is so big that, according to our medical statistician, a randomized control trial [RCT] is now redundant. Nevertheless, we invite a head-to-head RCT by independent researchers – so far, there are no takers.”

6 Choices to Make Your Mental & Physical Goals a Success in 2019

According to U.S. News, approximately 80% of resolutions fail by the second week in February. Why? Because dramatic and immediate changes are not sustainable long-term.

So this year, make 2019 not a year of resolutions or diets but one of incremental changes to instill habits that create real long-lasting results. Here are 6 tips:

Do What You Enjoy:

Commit to trying new things or even old things to remind yourself of what you enjoy. This is especially true for keeping active and fulfilling your body’s desire for movement and exercise. This can be taking frequent walks through nature, biking, dancing, hiking, or yoga. Start taking ballroom dancing lessons that you promised yourself you would try years ago. Take a barre method class where you can let your inner ballerina shine. Better yet, put that music on full blast while you are preparing dinner and dance like no one’s watching. It is not about perfection, it is about finding what you love to do and what brings a smile to your face, then it becomes fun and not something you want to do.

Add Things, Don’t Remove Them:

If your goal is to improve your nutrition to lose weight and improve your energy levels, try adding foods into your diet like vegetables. Find fun ways to prepare them to fit your taste buds. Often times if you start with a deprivation statement like, “I am going to stop eating all carbs,” then the only thing you will think about is carbs. When you introduce something new and start noticing the benefits of that change, then you are often inspired to move on to add the next change. Think addition not deprivation!

Stop Eating by 6pm:

If you want to encourage the body to burn fat for energy, stop eating by 6 or 7pm. This allows the body to put most of its energy into rejuvenating and restoring the body for the next day. It also gives the body all time it needs to use up all the sugar storage in the liver so then it can start burning the fat cells for needed energy.

Take 5 Minutes to Stop & Breathe:

If one of your goals is to start being more mindful or to simply start incorporating some relaxation techniques to help you react to stressful events with more ease then perhaps going from not meditating to promising to meditate every day for 45 minutes a day may be a bit overwhelming.

Try this simple strategy, wake up in the morning take a deep breath, record in a journal or on your phone one thing you are grateful for, appreciate or just makes you happy. Read it out loud and then follow with 5 slow breaths and really feel that joy. This way you are starting the habit and getting your body used to what relaxation and being in a state of gratitude feels like. During the day when things get hectic, pull out that book or play that recording and take 5 deep breaths. Fast, easy and often times very effective for decreasing the effects of those stress reactions.

Go to Bed 15 Minutes Earlier:

Work on getting a good night’s rest. A healthy amount of sleep helps you to be more alert, make better decisions, maintain a healthier weight and helps you to look and feel younger. Go to bed 15 minutes earlier each week for a month so you total an hour more of sleep. Remove all electronic devices in the bedroom that gives off artificial light and creating a bedtime routine that signals the body that it is time for bed.

Spend Your Time with Like-Minded People:

Make an effort to spend more quality time reconnecting with family or friends.  Individuals who have social connections suffer less symptoms of depression and may live longer healthier, lives. Also, establishing a support group can help to stay on track with our goals. This may look like once every two weeks to a month spending some time with your girlfriends or skyping or face timing them to catch up.

Making these gradual changes can help you to create habits that will help to feel more energized, feel less stressed, think more clearly and make better choices for you. With each choice comes the opportunity to be the person you have always envisioned.

Eudene Harry MD is the medical director for Oasis Wellness and Rejuvenation Center, a wellness practice devoted to integrative holistic care. She is a veteran physician with over 20 years of experience. Dr. Harry earned her medical degree and performed her residency at Thomas Jefferson University.

Dr. Harry is the author of three books designed to empower the individual to get started on their path to optimal health. She has published extensively on the topics of reducing stress, healthy lifestyle choices, and regaining youthfulness. Her most recent book, Be Iconic: Healthy and Sexy at Any Ageis now available on Amazon.

UFC × Trifecta

UFC®, the world’s premier mixed martial arts organization, today announced a new, multi-year marketing partnership with Trifecta Nutrition, the nation’s largest all-organic meal delivery service. Under the groundbreaking new agreement, Trifecta becomes UFC’s first-ever “Official Meal Delivery Partner”, creating a brand-new sponsorship category for UFC. In return, Trifecta will have a branded presence at the UFC Performance Institute®, the state-of-the-art athlete training facility in Las Vegas, and an activation presence at UFC’s live events. UFC and Trifecta will also collaborate on a co-branded video series and social media campaigns, and Trifecta will utilize UFC branding to create custom delivery boxes and to promote national sweepstakes for UFC events.

“We’re excited to bring Trifecta on board to create a new partnership category for UFC,” said Paul Asencio, UFC Senior Vice President, Global Partnerships. “Meal delivery is a rapidly growing market, and the quality meals and industry leading service Trifecta provides can benefit both fitness-conscious athletes and everyday consumers.”

“UFC is the ideal partner to help us evangelize clean eating and further spread the word about the weight management advantages of healthy meal prep and meal delivery with Trifecta,” said Greg Connolly, Trifecta Co-Founder & CEO. “We have the opportunity to showcase our true value to the fans of UFC with some of the exciting programs we are rolling out together in the coming months.”

UFC and Trifecta first collaborated in November 2017 for UFC® 217: BISPING vs. ST-PIERRE at Madison Square Garden, where the companies unveiled a co-branded training and nutrition video featuring former UFC bantamweight champion Cody Garbrandt. Garbrandt, one of Trifecta’s brand ambassadors, will next face UFC bantamweight champion TJ Dillashaw in a rematch for the UFC bantamweight title in the main event of UFC® 227: DILLASHAW vs. GARBRANDT 2, live on Saturday, August 4, from STAPLES Center in Los Angeles.

In addition to Garbrandt, Trifecta boasts an impressive roster of athletes and celebrities such as “Fittest Man on Earth” Rich Froning, actor Liam Hemsworth, Wonder Woman/Justice League actor and CrossFit star Brooke Ence, and Detroit Lions tight end Luke Willson, along with more than 130 additional NFL players, celebrities and celebrity athletes.

About UFC®

UFC® is a premium global sports brand and the largest Pay-Per-View event provider in the world. Celebrating its 25thAnniversary in 2018, UFC boasts more than 284 million fans worldwide and has produced over 440 events in 22 countries since its inception in 1993. Acquired in 2016 by global sports, entertainment and fashion leader Endeavor (formerly WME | IMG), together with strategic partners Silver Lake Partners and KKR, UFC is headquartered in Las Vegas with a network of employees around the world. UFC produces more than 40 live events annually that consistently sell out some of the most prestigious arenas around the globe, while programming is broadcast in over 160 countries and territories to 1.1 billion TV households worldwide in 40 different languages. UFC FIGHT PASS®, a digital subscription service, delivers exclusive live events, thousands of fights on-demand and original content to fans around the world. For more information, visit UFC.com and follow UFC at Facebook.com/UFC, Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram: @UFC.

About Trifecta

Trifecta is the nation’s largest all-organic meal delivery service founded with a bold mission – to get America back into shape. Eliminating shopping, cooking and cleaning by delivering fully cooked meals directly to customers’ doors in all 50 states, Trifecta’s food is the highest quality in the industry and uses 100% USDA Organic, Gluten, Dairy and Soy-Free ingredients that are never frozen, and Wild Caught/Grass Fed. All their food arrives in a refrigerated case, vacuum sealed and ready to eat. Trifecta offers meals in four categories to meet everyone’s needs including Paleo, Vegan, Clean Eating and Classic Meal and an A La Carte section that operates more like an online grocery store deli. Trifecta is a Title Sponsor of Team USA Weightlifting and the CrossFit Games, teaming up with CrossFit, Inc. to combat chronic disease. Their app “Trifecta – Fitness, Nutrition and Tracking” is the first time an all-in-one solution for people track their food and performance right from their smartphones utilizing Trifecta’s food database 5+ million food items. For more information on Trifecta, visit trifectanutrition.com, download their nutrition app at www.trifectanutrition.com/app and follow them at facebook.com/trifecta meals, @trifectasystem on Instagram and Twitter, or subscribe to them on YouTube at Trifecta.

Best Foodie Cities

Which World Cities Have the Best Foodie Scenes?

  • Bott and Co reveal the top 50 cities with the most diverse food scenes.
  • New York is top of the list with London a close second.
  • The top rated restaurants for each national cuisine in each city also revealed.

Want to know which cities offer the most diverse food scenes? Bott and Co have created the perfect tool.

By researching the number of different national cuisines in cities with a population of over 1 million, the company have been able to find out the world’s best foodie cities.

New York is top of the list with 94 national cuisines represented. From Café Katja on Orchard Street to the Somalian Safari on 116th Street, there’s more than enough choice wherever you go in the Big Apple. London is next on the list with 89 different cuisines including niche restaurants like the Pasha Kyrgyz Kazakh House and the Bariloche, Argentinian Grill & Bar.

Toronto lies at number 3 and is among some of the less well-known culinary centres to make the list, as is Dubai, reflecting the region’s focus as a Middle Eastern hub that attracts people from all over the world. As you might expect, Paris fits neatly in at 5th on the list while the quintessentially European Berlin comes equal 6th with Melbourne, Australia.

The Top Ten Restaurants for Foodie Diversity are:


The interactive tool allows you to quickly take a look at any of the big cities around the world and find out which national cuisines can be found. The tool also includes information about the top-rated restaurant for every national cuisine on offer in each city. Click on the spot and you get an address and link to Google Maps so you can take a closer look at the restaurant and the food that’s on offer.

View the top 50 most diverse foodie scenes, cuisine available and best restaurants on the Bott and Co website here.

FOOD SAFETY TIPS

11 food safety tips to pack for spring break

Whether you spend spring break partying in a city, exploring a different country or getting some R&R at home, don’t let food safety take a vacation. “Spring break is the perfect time to make memories with family and friends and Stop Foodborne Illness wants to make sure it’s the FUN MEMORIES that fill up your social media,” says Stop Foodborne Illness CEO, Deirdre Schlunegger.

Maintaining basic food safety standards, like washing hands, and adding some travel-specific practices is the best way to ensure foodborne illness won’t interrupt a fun getaway. Check out the Stop Foodborne Illness top tips for food safety during spring break.

All-inclusive resorts have many perks; they are touted as safer, more affordable, ideal for partying and usually include 24/7 buffets. Having unlimited access to food and drink is convenient, but can be potentially dangerous. Buffets serve large amounts of food over long periods of time, meaning there are more opportunities for food to not be kept at consistent, correct temperatures. Additionally, everyone shares the same serving utensils, increasing the risk of spreading pathogens. Since many all-inclusive resorts also have sit-down dining options on site, Stop Foodborne Illness recommends avoiding the buffet when possible and following these tips when it’s not.

• There’s always the possibility that food has not been held at proper temperatures – cold foods (salads, cold cuts, dressings) should be cold and hot foods (soups, meats, fish) should be hot. Any food that’s served at room temperature, and isn’t supposed to be, is within the temperature “danger zone” where bacteria can thrive.

• If you’ve gotten away to a warmer climate, remember the one-hour rule. Any perishable foods that have been sitting out beyond one hour when the temperature is higher than 90° F, is not safe to consume. (It’s 2 hours, if the temperature is below 90° F.)

• Another source of contamination is when food is mishandled by people with unclean hands. If you see something, say something. Don’t assume anything. And, of course, after a day’s activities, be sure to wash your own hands before eating.

• Fresh fruit and vegetables from the buffet can be a great poolside snack but don’t forget to wash and peel the tasty treat before eating. If you’re in an area with unsafe water, wash the produce with bottled or filtered water.

Eating and drinking can be some of the best things about travelling abroad. While “going local” is a delicious way to experience a new cuisine, it can also be an easier way to contract foodborne illness. Stop encourages travelers to be adventurous, but smart when it comes to consuming food in different countries.

Street food is a great way to experience local culture, but often, stalls don’t have the same hygiene standards as restaurants that cater to tourists. Stop Foodborne Illness recommends being aware of this difference and making wise choices when enjoying dishes from local restaurants or street stands.

• Avoid establishments where the food handlers don’t practice good hygiene, such as tying back their hair, wearing protective gloves and having clean hands and fingernails.

Be selective when choosing foods. Avoid raw milk and raw milk cheeses, and other raw foods—including undercooked meat and seafood, and uncooked vegetables —as well as foods that require a lot of handling before serving.

• Be extra cautions when visiting a remote destination. Turn up the food safety dial a notch; even though you may enjoy certain foods and beverages at home—like rare meat or runny eggs—it’s better to avoid questionable foods while in a different country. (Being sick in a language you don’t know can really complicate matters.)

As they say, half the fun is getting there! When you’re road tripping, in a rental or hopping on a plane, make sure you arrive at your destination safely with safe snacking habits.

• Sanitize tray tables, seat armrests and door handles with an 60% alcohol-based wipe. These frequently touched areas are generally made of plastic, a nonporous material that allows germs to live on longer, and have a higher risk of spreading foodborne illness.

• Keep food out of the danger zone. Make sure cold food stays cold—at or below 40°F—by packing it in coolers with frozen gel packs or ice. Stop Foodborne Illness suggests packing beverages in one cooler and perishable foods in another since you are likely to grab beverages most often while on the road. Since hot food needs to stay hot—at or above 140°F, Stop Foodborne Illness suggests passing on hot foods and opting instead for peanuts, and other nuts (including nut butters), jelly, crackers, chips, dried fruit, baked goods such as cookies or muffins, granola bars, popcorn, and whole fresh fruits like bananas, apples, and oranges.

• Rinse all fresh produce under running tap water (and patting it dry) before packing it in a cooler, including produce with peel-away skins or rinds. Follow this checklist to make sure coolers are packed properly.

Not going anywhere? Enjoy a relaxing staycation at home but don’t let your food safety practices go on a break. The best way to prevent the spread of foodborne illness is to continue following proper food safety. Wash your hands for 20 seconds before handling food, cook food to a safe internal temperature and clean cooking equipment and surfaces after preparing raw foods. Visit website for more food safety tips.

About Stop Foodborne Illness

Stop Foodborne Illness is a national nonprofit, public health organization dedicated to preventing illness and death from foodborne pathogens by promoting sound food safety policy and best practices, building public awareness, and assisting those impacted by foodborne illness. For more food safety tips please visit here. If you think you have been sickened from food, contact your local health professional. You may subscribe to receive Stop Foodborne Illness e-Alerts and eNews here.

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Street Food Markets × Global Travellers

30 Street Food Markets for the Global Traveller


A new interactive from JohnSlots looks at the world’s best and most recognisable street food markets, delving into everything from potjie in South Africa to scorpions-on-sticks in China.



Street food is a staple all over the world. Wherever you go, you can be walking down a street and catch the alluring smell of local cuisine, leading you into market stalls, food halls, and local malls to try something different.

Food markets offer meals on the go for workers, travellers, and those who just happen to be passing by. And now, with an interactive guide from JohnSlots, you can check out the best options around the world – whether you’re looking for a spot to eat on your next holiday, or if you’re trying to tick off the last few points on your cultural food bucket list, have a look and see what’s on the menu.

Hotpots and Hotspots

The markets are often an insight into the country’s approach to the world, whether they’re bustling areas of activity or calm places to relax with a drink and a bite to eat. Stop off at one to find yourself the regional favourites and to see the local street food style.
For a mix of experiences, make sure to have a look into:

  • Coronation Market, Kingston, Jamaica – known as the “stomach of Jamaica”, Coronation Market is a loud and energetic mix of people looking for traditional Jamaican flavours.
  • Borough Market, London, UK – with both permanent restaurants and outside stalls, it’s an ideal eatery for every sort of occasion, whether in a hurry or when looking for somewhere to sit and watch the world go by.
  • The Grand Bazaar, Istanbul, Turkey – while food is served from lively stalls throughout the Bazaar, you’ll also hear the shouts and laughter of haggling and trade, as the Bazaar also features a wide range of shops and trades.
  • Albert Cuypstraat, Amsterdam, The Netherlands – a diverse array of foods crammed into one street, you’re likely to see people wandering about with colourful cones of patat: the local chips, topped with mayonnaise.
  • Wangfujing Snack Street, Beijing, China – if you like your markets colourful and different, you could do worse than exploring the best snack street in Beijing, where you’ll find scorpions on sticks, colourful candied fruits, and unusual seafood.

Taste Bud Explorer

Culture and snacks are great, but what if you like your holidays exciting and your food adventurous? Try some unfamiliar dishes from the corners of the globe, and get a taste for the unusual:

  • Scorpion-on-a-Stick, from China – Should you like your food with a bit of a sting in the tail, there’s a food for you. They’re a popular deep-fried option on the Wangfujing Snack Street.
  • Ceviche, from Peru – Raw fish is marinated in citrus juices and served with onions, chilli, and seasoning, for a salad-y South America take on sushi.
  • Snail Soup, from Marrakesh – Exactly what it says on the tin, snails are brewed up with seasonings into a broth.
  • Abalone, from Chile – If you liked the sound of the snail soup, why not souper-size the order and serve giant sea snails with lettuce and mayonnaise?
  • Peppered Shrimp, from Jamaica – While shrimp are popular the world over, the real adventure in this is the Scotch Bonnet pepper sauce, which packs a punch and can get not only your mouth watering, but also your eyes.

Food is different everywhere. There are different flavour palates, different spices, different meats – including insects and fish. Even simple dishes are cooked completely differently from place to place. If you want to get to the heart of a culture, it’s got to be through the food, and there’s no food more representative of local tastes than what you can pick up in the food hubs you find in the streets.

Whether you’re looking for a new taste experience or just trying to track down the nearest food stop on your grand global holiday, make sure to check out the rest of the dishes and the markets where you can find them in the full interactive guide here.