Posts tagged with "drink responsibly"

Adam Sbragia Launches Home Field Red Blend

Fourth Generation Sonoma Winemaker Adam Sbragia Launches Home Field Red Blend

Sbragia Family Vineyards winemaker Adam Sbragia continues his family’s legacy in Dry Creek Valley, launching his own brand, Home Field Red Blend.  Produced from the 2016 vintage, the debut wine is crafted from five grape varieties grown in six different vineyards: Gino’s Estate Zinfandel, La Promessa Estate Zinfandel, Teldeschi Petite Sirah, Forchini Carignane, Andolsen Cabernet and Home Ranch Estate Merlot.

“Born and raised in Dry Creek Valley, I’ve explored every vineyard in every corner of my Home Field to create a modern wine that expresses purity of fruit and my family’s long winemaking history,” remarks Adam.

“I want to extend the winemaking tradition that my great-grandfather started when he came to Dry Creek Valley from Italy in 1904.  Being a 4th generation winemaker, I grew up in the vineyards, riding a tractor with my grandfather Gino and pruning and tasting grapes with my father, Ed Sbragia,” comments Adam.  “I’ve been making wine side by side with my dad for a dozen years.  It’s exciting to take what I’ve learned and make a wine that’s all my own.”

Home Field 2016 Red Blend

Dry Creek Valley | Sonoma County

Inaugural Vintage

The texture of wine, its infinite range of aromas and flavors is all tangled up with soil and climate and history and culture, a spectacular mash-up of people and place, wit and wisdom and everyday life.

Wit | 51% Zinfandel, 8% Carignane, 4% Petite Sirah

Wisdom | 25% Cabernet Sauvignon, 12% Merlot

Wine | 100% Delicious!

$25/bottle suggested retail price

Available to taste and purchase in both the Sbragia Family Vineyards Tasting Room in Geyserville and Sonoma.

To watch Adam Sbragia’s Home Field Red video visit https://vimeo.com/329161067

Video Credit: Erin Malone at Lightspeed Films 

About

The Sbragia family has been farming and making wine in DCV for over 100 years.  Adam’s great-grandfather came from Tuscany in 1904 and worked in local wineries.  Adam’s grandfather, Gino, acquired his own vineyards near Healdsburg, growing Zinfandel for sale and home winemaking.  In 2006, after 32 years as winemaster at Beringer Vineyards, Adam’s father, Ed Sbragia, opened the doors to Sbragia Family Vineyards at the northern end of Dry Creek Valley.  In addition to launching Home Field Red Blend, Adam continues his position as Sbragia Family Vineyards winemaker.  For more information, visit www.homefieldred.com and www.sbragia.com.

Wine Spectator Announces Winners of 2019 Restaurant Awards

—Dining Destinations Around the World Recognized for their Dedication to Wine

Finding a place to drink great wine around the globe has never been so easy. Wine Spectator has uncorked the winners of the 2019 Restaurant Awardswhich honors the world’s best restaurants for wine. This year, the Restaurant Awards program honors 3,800 dining destinations from all 50 states in the U.S. and 79 countries internationally.

Launched in 1981, the Restaurant Awards are judged on three levels: the Award of Excellence, the Best of Award of Excellence and the Grand Award, with 2,447; 1,244; and 100 winners this year in each respective category. Eight of the Grand Award winners—Alfredo Di Roma Mexico in Mexico City, Fiola in Washington, D.C., Griggeler Stuba in Lech am Arlberg in Austria, Mastro’s Steakhouse at the Post Oak Hotel in Houston; Pappas Bros. Steakhouse in Downtown Houston; The Pool in New York City, Ristorante Cracco in Milan and Vantre in Paris—are first timers.

“We’re pleased to shine a spotlight on the destinations around the world that show devotion to their wine program, while also creating a comprehensive global dining guide for our readers to enjoy,” said Marvin R. Shanken, Editor and Publisher, Wine Spectator. “Both novice wine lovers and seasoned sommeliers alike actively seek and frequent restaurants with exciting, well-curated wine lists. Bravo to all the 2019 recipients—we raise a glass to you.”

All winners are profiled at Restaurants.WineSpectator.com and in the Restaurant Awards app. The app, available free on the App store, allows iPhone and iPad users to find nearby award-winning restaurants, with maps, plus helpful information about cuisine, wine and pricing.

The Award of Excellence recognizes restaurants whose wine lists feature a well-chosen assortment of quality producers. Best of Award of Excellence recipients offer more extensive selections with significant vintage depth and excellent breadth across multiple regions.

The Grand Award is the program’s highest honor. This elite group comprises the world’s best wine programs, which deliver serious breadth of top producers, outstanding depth in mature vantages, excellent harmony with the menu and superior presentation. Wine Spectator carefully assesses each Grand Award candidate, including rigorous independent, on-site inspections of the wine program, cellar, service, ambiance and cuisine of the restaurant.

The full list of award winners is available in print in Wine Spectator’s August issue, on newsstands July 16.
Follow the Restaurant Awards on Twitter and Instagram, with hashtag #WSRestaurantAward.

About Wine Spectator

Wine Spectator is the world’s leading authority on wine. Anchored by Wine Spectator magazine, a print publication that reaches around 3 million readers worldwide, the brand also encompasses the Web’s most comprehensive wine site (WineSpectator.com), mobile platforms and a series of signature events. Wine Spectator examines the world of wine from the vineyard to the table, exploring wine’s role in contemporary culture and delivering expert reviews of more than 15,000 wines each year. Parent company M. Shanken Communications, Inc., also publishes Cigar AficionadoWhisky Advocate, Market WatchShanken News Daily and Shanken’s Impact Newsletter.

Mix Up These Delectable Cocktails For National Tequila Day

If there is ever a food holiday that needs to be celebrate and acknowledged as a national holiday, it is National Tequila Day on July 24. Whether you prefer the sweetness of the Añejo or the smoothness of the Blanco, we have got you covered with flavorful bevvies from margaritas to a spicy beso caliente! Have your own fiesta at home with these five recipes below!

Cardamom Margarita

INGREDIENTS

2oz of Cardamom-infused DeLeon Platinum tequila

1oz lime juice

.5oz Gum Syrup

PREPERATION

Infuse 10 grams of cardamom in a 750 ml bottle of DeLeon Platinum for 20-30 minutes.

Add ice, 1oz lime juice, 0.5oz gum syrup, and 2oz of cardamom-infused DeLeon Platinum in a shaker.

Strain & serve.

Garnish with a cardamom pod.

GLASSWARE

Margarita

GARNISH

Cardamom seeds

DeLeon Paloma 

INGREDIENTS

1.5 oz DeLeon Reposado tequila

1 oz grapefruit juice

.75 oz lime juice

.5 oz simple syrup

Pinch of Kosher salt

Club Soda

PREPARATION

Shake all ingredients with ice & strain over fresh ice into glass.

Top with Club Soda

GLASSWARE

Highball/Collins glass

GARNISH

Grapefruit wedge

Twisted Maria

INGREDIENTS

1.5oz DeLeon Platinum tequila

1oz Watermelon Juice

3 Cherry tomatoes on Vine

.5oz Lime Juice

1tsp Agave

PREPARATION

Mull 3 cherry tomatoes in a shaker

Blend 3-4 pieces of watermelon or 1oz of watermelon juice into a shaker

Add in remaining ingredients and pinch of salt

Shake, strain and pour over ice

GLASSWARE

Rocks Glass/Collins

GARNISH

Lime Wedge and Tomato

Raspberry Sour

 

INGREDIENTS

1.5oz DeLeon Añejo

.75oz Lemon

.5oz Simple syrup

4-5 muddied raspberries

PREPARATION

Muddle raspberries in a shaker, add remaining ingredients and strain over a coupe

GLASSWARE

Coupe

GARNISH

Raspberries on a cocktail pick

Beso Caliente

 INGREDIENTS

1.5oz DeLeon Reposado tequila

.75oz lemon juice

1 oz simple syrup

4-6 dashes Angostura bitters

PREPARATION

Shake first three ingredients with ice & strain into a small coupe glass

Float Angostura bitters

GLASSWARE

Either small coupe glass or rocks glass over ice

Six Ways to Cut Down on Alcohol

by Tara Yombor, LMHC and clinical director at Pathway to Hope, a Delphi Behavioral Health Group facility.

Social (moderate) drinking, binge drinking, alcoholism, tolerance, and dependence. This is the typical pattern of progression for drinking that leads someone to think of him or herself as needing to cut down on alcohol. Some might think they are prone to alcoholism. Within that progression, the time for someone to cut down on drinking is based on the individual’s idea of what is causing dysfunction and unmanageability in their life.

Why is it so easy for someone to become addicted to alcohol, and what does it mean to have
an alcohol use disorder?

First of all, alcohol does not have an adverse social stigma, which makes the dependence for it more likely, and the consumption of it more acceptable. Alcohol is typically used to celebrate happy events and sooth the sad events in life. Think about a celebration. What do most people imagine? Alcohol, champagne, and a “toast to the New Year!”

During times of mourning or stress, alcohol can be used to ease the emotional pain of a loss or as a stress reliever. Social (or moderate) drinking is seen as a normal and perfectly harmless way of socializing, relaxing, or a form of celebration.

A binge drinker is defined as a man who drinks more than four to six drinks in a two-hour period, and a woman who drinks more than four to five drinks in a two-hour period. Someone with alcohol use disorder is typically a person with a long-term addiction to alcohol. This person is typically unable to control how much they consume or when to stop drinking and spends a lot of time thinking about the next drink.

It can be easy for someone to transition from a social drinker to a binge drinker to having an
alcohol use disorder. A binge drinker is someone who has more than the above allotted
acceptable drinks in a short amount of time.

Someone who is a binge drinker or struggling with heavy alcohol use may find that people close to them begin to notice negative patterns of behavior during times of drinking. Friends and family may start to become worried about the person’s drinking patterns and negative outcomes that have begun to arise from their drinking. A person who begins to engage in
binge drinking may find themselves calling out of work the day after drinking due to a hangover; they may miss important deadlines, get into arguments with their loved ones, or lose track of daily responsibilities.

Tolerance for alcohol means that a person needs more and more alcohol to feel the desired effect than they previously would not have needed. Someone who has a pattern of binge drinking may find themselves drinking even more alcohol in a short time to feel drunk.

Once tolerance increases, the possibility of dependence increases. Dependence can be defined as relying on alcohol to avoid withdrawal symptoms. Essentially, a person is controlled by their need to ingest alcohol to feel “normal.”

During any of these stages of alcohol use, someone may feel the need to seek treatment. The need for treatment varies for each person based on how dysfunctional or unmanageable their life has become due to their drinking.

Here are six things you (or anyone) can do to cut down on alcohol. Most of these mean a change in behavior.

1. Acknowledge the problem – in order to stop the behavior, you must first acknowledge what the negative behavior is and make a conscious effort to commit to changing that behavior. Also, put the goal in writing and make a list of reasons why you want to cut back on drinking. For example, if the behavior is drinking too much during celebrations, you have to determine what “too much” means to you and, next, set a goal to decrease the amount you are drinking during celebrations.

2. Set a realistic goal for drinking alcohol – if you struggle with binge drinking, set a realistic, and achievable goal. The next time you’re out during a social event, make it a goal to cut back to three to four drinks in two hours instead of five to six. Or perhaps instead of going to a happy hour on Friday or Saturday night, pick one night to go out and stay in the other night. Cutting back by making realistic and achievable goals will keep you on track and make you feel better about the fact that you are keeping your goals.

3. Write it down – make sure to keep a journal of the times you drink, how much you drink, and any negative outcomes related to the times you drink (for example, drinking and falling down or making an inappropriate comment to a friend). By keeping a journal, you will hopefully be able to see patterns of behavior. You can also share this journal with someone you trust and ask them to look out for any patterns you may have missed.

4. Don’t keep alcohol in your house – it is easier to come home after a long day of work and pour a glass of wine rather than going out to the bar on a Wednesday when you may have other obligations at home such as taking care of a child. When you don’t have alcohol in the house, it eliminates the desire or temptation to drink.

5. Stay busy – by having non-alcohol related activities to engage in, you are more likely to say no to drinking, as you’ll want to be present for the activity. Do things that keep you active, such as riding a bike, hiking, going for a walk as the endorphins from engaging in exercise may eliminate the desire for alcohol.

6. Ask for support/Talk to someone – tell people you trust about your goals and ask them to help keep you accountable during times when you may be struggling or find yourself surrounded by temptation. Also, there are therapists who specialize in alcohol/substance use who you can talk to that can assist you with your goals and process through any underlying emotions that may be related to drinking.

Remember that the above tips may not work for everyone. Some people may be into the stage of alcohol tolerance and dependence. If you or someone you love is struggling with alcohol dependence, reach out for help from a professional or call a treatment center in your area. Alcoholism and dependence look different for everyone.

Nat’l Pina Colada Day Cocktails

Nat’l Pina Colada Day (July 10): Toast with Reimagined Malibu Pina Colada Cocktails!

Malibu Coconut Water Pina Colada

·         Ingredients:

o    1 ½ part Malibu Original

o    1 ½ parts Coconut Water

o    2 parts Pineapple juice

o    ½ part Fresh Lime Juice

·         Method: Pour all ingredients into an ice-filled shaker, shake until cold and strain into a chilled glass filled with ice cubes, top with pineapple juice

·         Garnish: Slice of pineapple

 Malibu Pea’na Colada

·         Ingredients:

o    1 ¼ part Malibu Original

o    ¾ part Stoupakis Mastiha

o    ½ part Coconut Milk

o    ½ part Simple Syrup

o    ¾ part Snap Pea Juice

o    ½ part Lemon

o    Pinch salt

·         Method: Whip with pebble ice, serve over pebble ice

·         Garnish: Split Pea, Lemon Wheel


Classic Malibu Pina Colada

·         Ingredients:

o    1 part Malibu Original

o    1 ½ parts Pineapple juice

o    ½ part Coconut cream

·         Method: Pour everything in a shaker with ice, shake, pour and enjoy

·         Garnish: Slice of pineapple

360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery, bar, spirits

How to Get Financing to Start a New Bar

So you’ve decided to become a bar owner, congratulations! Now, you find yourself in the same dilemma many creative, business-minded entrepreneurs know all too well: You need additional funds to make your dream come true. What to do?

Lucky for you, there are several options you can look into. Let’s examine each one to see which one is the right move for you.

Take out a personal loan

This is a popular option among budding entrepreneurs because it has a higher success rate and offers a greater degree of flexibility. This is your best bet if you are starting a bar from scratch or if you don’t have an established business history yet.

Unlike a business loan, a personal loan will not require you to put down collateral or provide proof of cash flow. After all, it’s difficult to show income if you don’t have it yet. Business loans also have major restrictions on how the loan is used, but a personal loan gives you more freedom.

Your personal financial history and credit score will determine your eligibility and the rates and terms of your loan. A credit score of 600 puts you in an excellent position to qualify. Documents you need to submit include but are not limited to personal identification, bank statements, W-2 or pay stubs, and tax return.

Keep in mind that personal loans are generally smaller compared to a business loan so you may need to look into more options to acquire the rest of the funding you need. We discuss more below.

Look for investors

This is an excellent solution to share the financial burden with someone else. Investors provide startup money and can bring their business management expertise to the table. For this to work, you’ll have to get comfortable with splitting profits and giving up a share of your business.

If you wish to retain control of your bar, silent investors are great because they get out of your hair after providing the funding. They might be involved in big-picture dealings and will offer help if needed, but other than that, they stay in the background and leave the daily management to you.

The catch? They might pressure you to turn a profit sooner rather than later though. They may get restless and force a sale.

Active investors will generally be more involved in the day-to-day operations of your bar in an effort to enhance the return of their investment. They can also be helpful to first-time entrepreneurs looking to make industry connections and learn the tricks of the trade.

While active investors bring their business to the enterprise, you will definitely have to give up a degree of control. Some investors might agree to simply advance capital in exchange for collateral and payback with interest or a percentage of your profits.

Turn to your friends, family, and peers

Use your connections! Do you know someone who has the resources to spare? You can start reaching out to your peers in the industry or even to friends and family. This fast-tracks your funding process by skipping the legal entanglements typically involved in a traditional loan.

If you go the family and friends route, the pitch probably isn’t going to be all that complicated. But keep in mind that money and family sometimes don’t mix. If your bar fails to take off, things might get ugly. Especially with equity involved, put everything in writing and bring in a business lawyer as a safety net.

Reach out to the world through crowdfunding

If you’ve exhausted all your connections to no avail, the internet might be your savior. Yes, you can raise money for your new bar from strangers online through websites like GoFundMe, Patreon, and Kickstarter. How great is that?

Needless to say, you will have to convince these people why they should fund your bar. Tell your story and make sure to let your passion shine through.

Transparency will get you far down this route. Be specific on how you intend to spend the money they give you and provide updates. You would be surprised at how many people would be willing to donate their own money to help you with your venture.

Depending on your campaign, you can give these backers perks or rewards in return. However, if you choose to do it via equity crowdfunding, which will easily attract investors, you are selling off a degree of ownership control over your company.

Know that you will also need to actively market your campaign, so it can be seen and gain traction fast. This will take a lot of patience and hard work.

Use your 401(k)

If you are looking to ditch the 9-to-5 life in favor of being your own boss as a bar owner, this might be something to consider if you have saved up enough from your previous jobs.

You’re staking your retirement savings here, so make sure you are 100% certain of your bar idea. Most people can get overconfident for their own good. Consult a tax attorney, if needed, and look at all angles before you take the leap.

Consider the other options presented in this article first before cracking your 401(k) nest egg.

Get funding for expensive equipment

Equipment is an essential investment for any bar operation that comes that a premium price. A lender or bank can help you purchase the required furnishings to get your business up and running through equipment financing.

Here, you receive the entire amount based on a price quote you provide to the lender. You can’t use the funding for anything other than the equipment you intend to buy.

The collateral here is the equipment itself, which is great because you won’t have to worry about paying off more in the unfortunate event that your bar goes under.

When securing your bar equipment, it is important to anticipate your needs and choose the right configuration for your establishment. For a bar, you’ll need equipment such as keg coolers, undercounter refrigerators, and commercial ice makers.

While it can be tempting to go for second-hand items, buying brand new equipment can benefit your business in the long run. Used equipment can lead to unpleasant surprises that might cost you way more than the savings you initially had. Replacement parts for last-generation models will likely be very hard to find, thus halting your operation longer than it should.

Plus, it can be difficult to find out how well it has been maintained and the service life it has left. With any luck, you might be able to track down the original invoice and check the warranty it comes with.

With brand new equipment, you enjoy more savings and peace of mind that your business runs as it should. Benefits include:

• For the higher price tag, you get equipment that is less likely to break down to avoid disruptions that can cost you precious business, especially during peak hours.

• New units are generally more energy-efficient and environment-friendly than older models

• They go for much higher resale value, especially for well-known brands

• You can count on a more responsive service department for servicing and readily available replacement parts

We are committed to protecting your investment. We have an excellent selection of brand new and highly durable products from Manitowoc ice makers to Beverage Air refrigerators that come with excellent warranties and unrivaled customer support. We make sure your purchases work their best beyond the initial quality control.

Explore the benefits of a business credit card

This is the perfect option for buying ingredients and supplies. You’ll only need your credit score as qualification, and it doesn’t have to be all that impressive either. If you are at 600, you have a good chance of getting approved. Plus, the application process is easy.

You know how you get some perks and rewards every time you swipe your personal credit card? You can enjoy the same for your bar here. You can get excellent cash back and credit for business expenses.

Consider credit card receipt financing

There are some lenders that partially base their loan on receiving part of the credit card receipts from your customers. The process basically involves selling your future credit card sales in exchange for a cash advance. A portion of each credit card sale is taken out as payment. This can be an interesting approach but can also interfere with your finances.

Financing your new bar the right way

As a rule of thumb, you should have at least six months of expenses available in the bank when you start. Most businesses fail because of a lack of financing. So either do it right from the beginning or hold off until you can.

Cool Down this Summer with Red Wine Cocktails

Red wine isn’t the first thing that pops into your head for summer drinking. In fact, Rosé and spritz’s take the crown as the go-to cool down sips. But, it’s incredibly versatile and a simple addition to your favorite summer refreshment. Before you realize, you be swapping out the Aperol spritz for a red wine mule.

A bourbon barrel-aged red, like 1000 Stories (SRP $18.99), makes for the perfect topper or mixer in a summer cocktail, like the ones below. The added caramel notes and a hint of smoke from the bourbon barrel make the perfect pairing for a hot day.

Gold Rush Red Mule
* 4 oz. 1000 Stories Gold Rush Red
* .5 oz. Marschino
* .5 oz. Crème de Mure
* ginger beer
* Rosemary sprig garnish
Add the wine and liqueurs to a copper mug filled with ice. Top with ginger beer and stir with a bar spoon to incorporate. Garnish with a sprig of fresh rosemary.

Prospectors’ Proof Sour
* 2 oz. Rye Whiskey
* .75 oz. lemon juice
* 1 oz. simple syrup
* .5 oz. 1000 Stories Prospectors’ Proof
Shake the rye whiskey, lemon juice and simple syrup with ice. Strain into a double old-fashioned glass and fill with fresh ice. Float red wine over the top of the cocktail.

1000 Stories Splash
* 2 oz. Partida Tequila Blanco
* 1.5 oz. 1000 Stories Zinfandel
* .5 oz. fresh lime juice
* .5 oz. agave nectar
* 2 oz. grapefruit soda
* lime wedge for garnish
Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake and strain into a glass.

Napa Valley’s First Wine History Museum and Tasting Salon

Jean-Charles Boisset Introduces Napa Valley’s First Wine History Museum and Tasting Salon: 1881 Napa  

1881 Napa Showcases Napa Valley Wines and History in Historic Victorian Home Adjacent to the Oakville Grocery

Napa Valley’s first wine history museum and tasting salon, is now open. Jean-Charles Boisset, proprietor of Boisset Collection, has created an homage to Napa Valley, with a tasting room that showcases wines from Napa Valley’s distinct sub-appellations, a museum where guests can explore Napa’s rich wine history, an extensive collection of historic wine relics from Europe and the United States and original artifacts from the Early California Wine Trade Archive. 1881 Napa is located in a historic Victorian home built in 1874 next to Oakville Grocery (founded in 1881) in Oakville, California, both of which were purchased by Boisset Collection at the beginning of the year.

“Napa Valley has a powerful place in American wine history and 1881 Napa puts the region in perspective on the world stage,” said Boisset, who grew up in Burgundy, France imbued with a passion for wine and learning as the son of vintners and the grandson of educators. “An extraordinary amount has been accomplished in this enclave in a short amount of time and we want to create a destination that celebrates Napa’s long history and its pioneering founders while exploring Napa’s incredibly diverseterroir in one destination.”

The gateway to Napa Valley, 1881 Napa is must-stop for wine enthusiasts, providing guests the opportunity to discover Napa Valley’s AVAs for the first time, or to explore some of their favorite appellations more deeply. Napa Valley was the first AVA designated in California in 1981 and within the region are 16 sub-AVAs that contain more geological diversity than any other wine region, leading to dramatically different wines within Napa Valley.

Located in a building more than 140 years old that was reimagined by renowned architect Howard Backen, 1881 Napa is next door to Oakville Grocery, the oldest continually operating grocery store in California. The two centerpieces of the space — a 48-light Baccarat crystal Zenith chandelier and a reproduction of an 1895 map of Napa County on canvas hanging from the ceiling — provide a dramatic environment to explore the varied wines of the valley, while displays highlighting the unique stories and soils of each appellation surround the tasting room.

The wine museum in 1881 Napa is open to the public with complimentary visitation. A self-guided tour up to and along the museum’s second-floor mezzanine tells the history of Napa Valley, introduces the founders and influential early pioneers  of the region and presents a robust collection of wine ephemera, including historic winemaking, vineyard, nursery and cooperage as well as displays curated and organized by the Early California Wine Trade Museum featuring local historic wine artifacts from the collections of Dean Walters and John O’Neill. From the mezzanine, guests have an open view to the tasting room below.

Alcoves hold soil samples from the various regions, along with 1881 Napa wines and descriptions of the appellations written by best-selling and award-winning author of The Wine Bible and wine expert Karen MacNeil. MacNeil also helped develop the various tasting options, which include comparative flights such as “Majestic Mountains Versus Plush Valley” and “Is it Cool to be Hot or Hot to be Cool?” as well as an option to “Embark on a Journey Throughout the Valley” by tasting Cabernet Sauvignons from 12 different sub-AVAs. In addition to the site-specific Cabs, guests can enjoy wines from a blend of Napa Valley grapes, including a sparkling wine, Sauvignon Blanc, rosé, Chardonnay, red blend, Merlot and a Cabernet Sauvignon — all wines crafted exclusively for 1881 Napa by Winemaker Thane Knutson to reflect the diversity of Napa Valley. After sampling the broad range of Napa Valley styles, guests can discover which AVAs they like the most and purchase wines from 1881 Napa as well Oakville Grocery.

1881 Napa is located at 7856 St. Helena Highway in Oakville and is open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reservations are recommended and can be made here.

About Boisset Collection
Boisset is a family-owned collection of historic and unique wineries and lifestyle destinations led by Jean-Charles Boisset and bound together by a common vision: authentic, terroir-driven wines in harmony with their history, their future and the land and people essential to their existence. With more than 25 historical and prestigious still and sparkling wineries in the world’s preeminent terroirs, including Burgundy, Beaujolais, Jura, the Rhône Valley, the south of France and California’s Russian River Valley and the Napa Valley. Its California wineries include DeLoach Vineyards, Raymond Vineyards, Buena Vista Winery and JCB by Jean-Charles Boisset; its French properties feature Domaine de la Vougeraie, Jean-Claude Boisset, Bouchard Aîné et Fils, J. Moreau et Fils, Louis Bouillot, Domaines Henri Maire, Fortant and Bonpas. Each house retains its unique history, identity and style, and all are united in the pursuit of fine wines expressive of their terroir. Wine is at the center of Boisset’s mission, and is complemented by spirits, beer, cider, gourmet foods and luxury goods, both of its own design and from partnerships with historic companies such as Baccarat, Lalique, St. Louis, Riedel, Christofle, and Bernardaud. To learn more about the Boisset Collection, please visit www.boissetcollection.com.

Featured image credit: Alexander Rubin

Spark Joy with these 4th of July Cocktails

The most-anticipated summer weekend is just around the corner! Level up and make your Independence Day celebration sparkle with these simple yet elevated cocktails, each profiling a different flavor and sure to suit everyone’s preferences. After a heavy afternoon of  burgers and hot dogs, wash it all down with refreshing and low-sugar cocktails while jiving to your favorite tunes.

From a delicious Watermelon Firecracker Margarita to a Berry United Lemonade and elevated G&T, sip back and enjoy the summer weather.

The Independent G&T

    • 4 ounces Fever-Tree tonic water
    • 2-3 frozen cranberries (garnish)
    • 1 popsicle (garnish)
  • Ice

Pour Jaisalmer Gin and tonic water over ice in a tall glass. Stir and garnish with a popsicle and cranberries.


Berry United Lemonade

    • 3 cups lemonade
    • 1 cup cold water
    • 4-6 dashes Angostura bitters
    • Lemons (garnish)
    • Blueberries (garnish)
  • Ice

In a pitcher, pour Diplomatico Rum, lemonade and water. Add in lemon and bitters. Garnish with lemon slices and blueberries. Serve chilled.


Firecracker Margarita

    • Kosher salt
    • 1 lime wheel
    • 3 ounces fresh watermelon juice
    • ¾ ounces fresh lime juice
  • Watermelon (garnish)

Place some salt on a small plate. Rub rim of an old-fashioned or rocks glass with lime wheel (reserve for serving); dip in salt.

Combine watermelon juice, Partida Tequila, and lime juice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously. Strain cocktail into prepared glass and garnish with watermelon lime wheel.


10 Ways to Monitor Your Drinking this Cinco de Mayo

1. Don’t drink on an empty stomach. Savor your meal before you start drinking an alcoholic beverage.

2. Do not overeat and Sip your drink. Enjoy your beverage.

3. Avoid binging. The definition of binging is 5 drinks or more in less than 4-5 hours.

4. Keep your consumption of drinks as low as possible – not more than 3 drinks for a man and 2 for a woman.

5. Alcoholic beverages are similar in alcohol content. One beer is equivalent to a glass of wine or a shot of liquor.

6. Find a driver. Don’t drive after drinking. It is hard to judge your blood alcohol level and its effects on your cognitive ability and reflexes.

7. If you are a diabetic or hypertensive, suffering from a heart or liver condition, take your daily medications, and check with your doctor to avoid alcohol interactions with your medications.

8. If you are going to use Tylenol, don’t exceed more than 3 grams in one day. Be aware that a lot of headache medicines or pain killers contain acetaminophen (Tylenol), so avoid accidental overdosing.

9. Don’t mix alcohol with other recreational drugs.

10. Space your beverages to allow your body the ability to metabolize what you ingested and avoid intoxication.

Savor, Sip and Space

Curated by Dr. Tarek Hassanein of Southern California Liver Centers