Posts tagged with "Donald Trump"

Will Society Grow Angry Enough to Oust Trump? Watch the Stock Market

By Alan Hall

The political left is busy gathering rationales for impeaching President Trump. The political right is busy crying foul. Both sides may be missing an important indicator of his fate: the stock market.

The U.S. House of Representatives has voted to impeach a president twice in history. In both cases, the stock market was rising, and in both cases, the Senate voted for acquittal.

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Figure 1

Figure 1 shows the timing of President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment. On March 2, 1868, the House of Representatives formally submitted eleven articles of impeachment against Johnson. Yet the Senate acquitted Johnson on May 26, 1868, during a stock market rally that added to the 250% increase since October 1857.

 

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Figure 2

Figure 2 shows that a substantial rally in the Dow preceded President Bill Clinton’s impeachment in the House and subsequent acquittal in the Senate. Some of the most dramatic events in the Monica Lewinsky scandal occurred during the largest slide in the Dow during Clinton’s presidency. And despite a $70-million prosecution of perjury and obstruction of justice charges, the Senate ultimately acquitted the president as the Dow, Dow/gold and Dow/PPI rose to important peaks.

 

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Figure 3

Figure 3 shows the Dow Jones Industrial Average surrounding President Richard Nixon’s near-impeachment and resignation from office. The Watergate break-in occurred toward the end of a strong 67% rally in the Dow from May 1970-January 1973. That rally preceded Nixon’s landslide re-election. But as the Dow fell, the Watergate investigation ramped up, and Nixon’s fortunes changed. With almost certain impeachment looming, Nixon resigned from office on August 9, 1974.

Why are stocks and presidents’ fates tied so closely together? Socionomic theory posits that society’s mood influences both stock prices and the public’s perceptions of its leaders. Positive social mood makes society feel optimistic, buy stocks and credit leaders for their good feelings. Negative social mood makes society feel pessimistic, sell stocks and blame leaders for their bad feelings.

These tendencies show up in the results of U.S. impeachments and near-impeachments, and they’re also evident in presidential re-election outcomes. My colleagues at the Socionomics Institute demonstrated in a 2012 paper that stock market declines have tended to precede defeats of incumbent U.S. presidents, while stock market advances have tended to precede re-elections of incumbents. In fact, they found that the stock market proved to be a better re-election indicator than inflation, unemployment and GDP growth combined.

 

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Figure 4

So, what does this mean for President Trump? We considered this question in the June 2017 issue of The Socionomist. Figure 4 is a chart from that issue, updated to the present. It depicts the trend of social mood as reflected by the Dow. We left the gray arrows showing our 2017 analysis, and we added red arrows to suggest the possibilities going forward. In July 2017, Congressman Brad Sherman formally introduced an article of impeachment against Trump in the House of Representatives. Yet the impeachment process fizzled as the stock market advanced during 2017. Following the stock market peak on January 26, 2018, however, the tone of the critiques shifted, and even some on the political right became more disapproving of the president.

Since the October 3 stock market peak, criticism of the president has grown more raucous, and the Mueller investigation has implicated more of the president’s inner circle in illegal activities. The Democrats won control of the House in the 2018 midterms. On November 23, A New York judge allowed a lawsuit against the Trump Foundation to move ahead. A November 26 Gallup poll revealed Trump’s disapproval rating had hit an all-time high. By December 17, the Mueller investigation had issued more than 100 criminal counts and charged 34 people, 10 of whom have been found guilty. That same day, Wired published its list of “All 17 (Known) Trump and Russia Investigations” and said, “it’s increasingly clear that, as 2018 winds down, Donald Trump faces a legal assault unlike anything previously seen by any president.”

On December 18, the Trump Foundation agreed to dissolve, accused by the New York attorney general “of engaging in ‘a shocking pattern of illegality’ that included unlawfully coordinating with Mr. Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.” On December 20, Secretary of Defense James Mattis resigned, followed closely by diplomat Brett McGurk. Pentagon chief of staff Kevin Sweeney has also resigned. Christmas week, the National Christmas Tree stayed dark due to the government shutdown. Several news organizations ran stories Christmas Eve with versions of The Atlantic’s headline, “President Trump’s Nightmare Before Christmas,” as the stock market plunged. Of course, staunch supporters of the president remain, though it’s worth noting that Nixon had an approval rating among Republicans of approximately 50 percent when he resigned. Yet the number of critics of Trump is rising. According to a December 19 NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, 41% of Americans favor impeachment hearings.

What the Mueller investigation will ultimately reveal remains a big question. But social mood may play a bigger role in Trump’s fate than the facts. For that, watch the stock market closely, our best reflection of the trend of social mood.

TRIGGER WARNING: New Kavanaugh Video

***WARNING: This video is a dramatization of alleged events. It contains violent images that may be disturbing to some viewers. Caution is strongly advised.***

WATCH THE AGENDA PROJECT’S NEW VIDEO: TRIGGER WARNING

The Agenda Project released a new video featuring a dramatization of the alleged attempted rape several years ago by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh as described by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. As the text above warns, the footage may be disturbing for some. This is a delicate subject matter for many, but with the future of our nation at stake, we felt this video was an important one to make. If you feel up to it, we encourage you to watch, then act.

The video ends by providing the number to the US Senate switchboard. If you are as outraged as we are that a man credibly accused of attempted rape is being considered for a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court, please take a minute to call your Senators and demand that they vote against confirming Kavanaugh.

The video was released in conjunction with a piece written by Agenda Project Founder Erica Payne explaining the rationale behind putting out such potentially disturbing footage. In it, she writes:

“Senator Dean Heller called it “a little hiccup.” For Senator Lindsay Graham, it was “a smear.” The Honorable Orrin Hatch said, “This woman, whoever she is, is mixed up.” The X chromosome knows exactly what the Y chromosome means when it says things like that. It means we are nothing. Our claims to our bodies are NOTHING. Like a little hiccup, we will pass.

So it’s come to this. To showing them – showing as many men who have and would do this, and the ones who dismiss it when it’s done – what we’re actually talking about here.”

For more information on why we felt this video was so important for us to release, you can read more in the rest of her article HERE

Michael Savage: Stop Mass Hysteria

In his forthcoming book, STOP MASS HYSTERIA: America’s Insanity From the Salem Witch Trials to the Trump Witch Hunt (on sale October 9, 2018), #1 New York Times bestselling author Michael Savage not only deconstructs the Left’s response to traditional American values like borders, language, and culture, but takes the reader on an unprecedented journey through the long history of mass hysteria in the United States. From Christopher Columbus to the Salem witch trials to the so-called “Red Scares” of the 1930s and 40s and much more, Dr. Savage recounts the many times collective insanity—often prompted by sinister politicians with ulterior motives—has gripped the American public.

Dr. Savage provides vital context for the common elements of dozens of outbreaks of mass hysteria in the past, their causes, their short- and long-term effects, and the tactics of the puppet masters who duped gullible masses into fearing threats both real and imagined. By shining a light on the true nature and causes of American mass hysteria in the past, Savage provides an insightful look into who and what is causing dangerous unrest in our lives—and why.

Dr. Savage is available for interviews, and can discuss:

• WHY Americans can be so easily duped into believing unbelievable things

• How the internet has contributed to the polarization of America

• What his callers tell him about the deep divide between themselves and their neighbors

• Moments from history that presage our current crisis

• What we as Americans can do to stop mass hysteria

• And much more

About the Author:

In 2016, after twenty-two years on the air, Michael Savage was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame, an honor that Dr. Savage calls “the capstone of my life.” The Savage Nation, the country’s #1 streaming radio show, is one of the top programs in America, with millions of listeners and broadcast on over 230 stations, including WABC and KSFO. A prolific New York Times bestselling author, Dr. Savage has been profiled in Playboy and The New Yorker, and he has been awarded the Freedom of Speech Award from Talkers Magazine. He received his PhD in epidemiology and nutrition sciences from the University of California at Berkeley.

Emolument Clause Lawsuit

In ruling yesterday that an Emoluments Clause lawsuit can proceed against President Trump, a federal judge today relied heavily on scholarship by Professor John Mikhail of Georgetown Law.

In a short video, Prof. Mikhail recently explained what his research found about the original public meaning of “emolument.”

(Watch it on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube).

This definition is central to the case.

Today Judge Messitte citied Prof. Mikhail extensively and then sided with his conclusion, writing:

“In the Court’s view, the decisive weight of historical evidence supports the conclusion that the common understanding of the term ’emolument’ during the founding era was that it covered any profit, gain, or advantage, including profits from private transactions. Consideration of the purpose of both Emoluments Clauses confirms the broad interpretation of the term suggested by Plaintiffs.”

Trump-Putin Meeting

When Trump-Putin meeting takes place in Helsinki, the floating swimming arena in the city centre will become a familiar scene around the world. Some international medias will keep Helsinki Allas Seapool as their base.

See how the Finnish pontoon company Marinetek made this unique structure float with integrated heated fresh and sea water pools for year-around use. And all this just in front of the presidential palace of Finland. Could you imagine a public swimming arena less than 100 metres from the White House or Kremlin?

Video showing how the floating platform was built: https://youtu.be/J084mjaddaA

Technical data and details:
http://marinetek.net/blog/articles/the-allas-sea-pool-showcases-marineteks-diverse-planning-and-construction-know-how/
http://marinetek.net/blog/references/allas-sea-pool-helsinki-finland/

The urban seawater pool is a great example of Finnish engineering and advanced floating technology delivered by Marinetek.

Marinetek is a leading designer and turnkey builder of yacht marinas and floating structures that is well known for its large concrete pontoons and ability to undertake wide-ranging projects worldwide. The company has an impressive track record with over 2,000 reference projects in four continents.

Learn more about the essence Marinetek structural concrete pontoon technology and its benefits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwcOhJpPRUo

Donald Trump × a “March on Washington”

Dr. Charles Steele, Jr., President and CEO of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), is calling on “all people of good will”, who are outraged by President Donald Trump’s controversial immigration policies, to join the SCLC at its 60th Annual Convention July 12 -15, 2018 in Washington, which will focus on the current conditions of global racism and poverty. Dr. Steele, who heads the organization co-founded and first led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., believes the people’s desire to send a strong message about immigration, poverty and other critical matters in the U.S. could lead to another massive March on Washington like the historic rally inspired by Dr. King nearly 55 years ago on August 28, 1963.

“We’re witnessing partisan political gamesmanship when we should be talking about protecting children,” said Dr. Steele regarding President Trump’s most recent “zero tolerance” immigration policy, which has spark hundreds of demonstrations across the nation. “Separating children from their parents at the border is an abomination! This is a humanitarian disgrace.”

Dr. Steele, who has been actively involved with The Civil Rights Movement for more than 40 years, says he is hopeful that President Trump can find empathy for the thousands of immigrants affected by his policy.

“I recommend that the President considers the human aspect of this tragic situation and not merely the politics,” said Dr. Steele. “Immigrants are trying to get to America because they’re being terrorized in their own homes. They’re faced with daily violence, poor living conditions, and their human rights are being threatened every day.”

Dr. Steele, who is in Brazil examining the international concerns of poor people, added, “I will get a global perspective on the problems afflicting the poor and really highlight their concerns at this year’s conference.”

The 60th Annual Convention will also have a heavy focus on mobilizing large groups of people of color to “get out and vote”. There will be various workshops and panels on the power of voting.

“People are mad, people are moved, and people are fed up. It’s time to use this energy in a constructive manner,” said Dr. Steele, who believes if the people unify around another SCLC- inspired massive rally it can surpass the 250,000 who gathered in Washington in 1963.

The SCLC Convention will run from July 12 to 15 at the Renaissance Hotel in Washington, D.C, 999 9th Street NW. For more information about the 60th Annual SCLC National Convention, please visit their website at nationalsclc.org.

ABOUT THE SCLC: Established in 1957, the SCLC, whose first president was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is a now an international organization made up of chapters and affiliates with programs that affect the lives of all Americans: north, south, east, and west. Its sphere of influence and interests has become international in scope because the human rights movement transcends national boundaries.

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE

Critically acclaimed exhibition ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE returns this April with a benefit auction hosted by ARTSY. Celebrate art for activism with works by more than 65 emerging and mid-career artists including Ann Lewis, Grace Graupe-Pillard, Rebecca Leveille, Michelle Pred, Indira Cesarine, Signe Pierce and Parker Day, among many others. Every work sold goes toward supporting the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and its mission to defend and preserve the rights and liberties guaranteed by the constitution of the United States. 

The ARTSY benefit auction features artwork across all mediums addressing the issues our society has been confronted with such as immigration rights, health care, reproductive rights, climate change, transgender rights, white supremacy, gender equality, gun control and more. It will additionally feature many new works by artists of the ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE exhibition.

Bidding opened today at 12 noon and will close on April 19th at 5pm! Head over now to bid and help raise funds for the ALCU. 

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE BENEFIT AUCTION ARTISTS: 

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alyson Provax, Ann Lewis, Anna Rindos, Annika Connor, Anya Rubin, Bradford Scott Stringfield, Cabell Molina, Camilla Marie Dahl, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, Desdemonda Dallas, Desire Moheb Zandi, Dessie Jackson, Diana Casanova, Dolly Faibyshev, Domenica Bucalo, Eleni Giannopoulou, Elisa Garcia de la Huerta, Elise Vazelakis, Erin Victoria Axtell, Fahren Feingold, Gabriela Handal, Grace Graupe Pillard, Hannah Stahl, Indira Cesarine, James Hsieh, Jamia Weir, Jamie Martinez, Jen Dwyer, Joanne Leah, Joel Tretin,Kate Hush, Katya Kan, Kristin Malin, Kristin O’Connor, Leah Schrager, Leslie Kerby, Leslie Sheryll, Lola Jiblazee, Lola Ogbara, Manju Shandler, Marne Lucas, Mary Tooley Parker, Michael Reece, Michele Pred, Miss Meatface, Nichole Washington, Olga Filippova, Olive Allen, Panteha Abareshi, Parker Day, Rada Yakova, Rebecca Leveille, Rosary Solimanto, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Rute Ventura, Sarah Dillon, Signe Pierce, Stephanie Hanes, Tatana Kellner, Tommy Mitchell, Touba Alipour, Valerie Carmet, Valery Estabrook, Vanessa Teran, Yuri Murphy

VIEW AUCTION CATALOGUE

BID NOW ON ARTWORKS

 

 SELECT PRESS ON
“ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE”

Vogue 
“The Untitled Space Gallery Checks In With Nasty Women, One Year Later

CNN
“Artists mark Trump’s inauguration anniversary with day of protest art”

The Guardian
“One Year of Resistance: the exhibit chronicling the year in anti-Trump art” 

INTERVIEW
“What One Year Of Resistance Looks Like In The Art World”

New York Daily News
“Trump’s America reflected in ‘One Year of Resistance’ art show” 

Good Trouble
“White Lies: One Year of Resistance”

Metro News
“80+ artists commemorate ‘One Year of Resistance’” 

 

 

DREAMer of the Day

TheDream.US, the nation’s largest college access and success program for undocumented immigrant youth, has launched a “DREAMer of the Day” feature – a daily profile of a TheDream.US-affiliated Scholar whose story offers a powerful example why Congress passing legislation resolving the crisis facing DREAMers and TPS holders will be good for America.

Today’s DREAMer of the Day is Axel Galeas of California’s De Anza College:

“My American Dream, I have come to realize, involves much more than new clothes, iPhones, and materialistic things.

At De Anza College, I want to pursue a degree in either bioengineering or environmental engineering. After graduation, I hope to obtain a creative job that helps tackle climate change and helps shine light on the lack of funding that it is receiving. I want to become financially stable; I want to be able to travel and teach and learn everything there is to learn. I also want to become a United States citizen. While it still feels so crazy to me that a piece of paper determines citizenship, I want to fully participate in this, the country I now call home. I want to better my home, and a piece of paper could stand in the way of that.

Growing up and going to school as an immigrant wasn’t easy; I remember being in the first grade, right after arriving in this country, and beginning to learn English. It was all so foreign to me, having lived in Honduras my whole life. It felt strange even knowing there were other languages other than Spanish and realizing that Spanish was just one of many languages spoken across the world. Beyond learning the language, I remember struggling with the price comparison of items and clothes I had compared to my peers.

In high school, I became almost obsessed with luxury and clothes.  Every student seemed to be dressed their best and to have the most expensive things. I wanted these things and I’d envy them. This persisted for the first couple years of high school until I attended a life changing leadership symposium. This experience forced me to truly dig deep and re-evaluate my values and beliefs. Since then, even though I am still adjusting and confronting many challenges in life, I have become more self-aware and less focused on chasing material highs and competing with anyone on this level. I have adapted a mindset that focuses more on being mindful of the people around me as well as myself and my feelings as a person, in other words I’ve become more proficient in emotional intelligence.

I do have to remind myself of this sometimes and also of how far I’ve come living here. I need to stop, take a deep breath, appreciate everything I have, and continue with this headspace.  I would be living a completely different life had I stayed in Honduras – a life with significantly less opportunity. A life where many grow up to be murderers and drug dealers. I look back on myself as a freshman in high school, sitting in my English class where the majority of the class was Caucasian. I was one of two non-white students, out of the thirty students in my class. This made me feel inferior, looked down on, and, at times, discriminated against. Some of it was in my head, while some of it was also evident in the way I was treated in respect to my peers by my peers.

Then, during my senior year, I was in an AP Literature class with that same teacher who taught that freshman year English class. We built a strong connection throughout my high school years, and he witnessed me mature and grow into a secure, self-loving man.  He saw firsthand that I no longer felt intimidated by my classmates and that I took initiative in conversation in the classroom. It felt like a lot had come full circle for me in a short period of time, and it makes me proud to reflect on this growth.

As high school neared its end, I had no idea how I was going to pay for college, better yet how I’d survive in the real world while being undocumented. I knew that I would somehow, even if that meant taking out loans. I didn’t realize this would be nearly impossible to finance, but I made up my mind that I would be college educated. When I learned about TheDream.US scholarship from one of my teachers, I was amazed at the amount that this offered and the extent to which this could help fund my college dreams. After putting effort into my studies, I realized that I had been surviving the real world all along, only now it has been formerly addressed as an issue.

I am a DACA student, one out of the 800,000 in this country who are just as lost as I am. Who struggle with self-identification, and have to constantly look over their shoulder. Because we do not trust easy. We want the best for this country and the people in it. I am American, and a piece of paper does not define me. Being American is the epitome of culture. We are culturally driven, so why are we not embracing these aspiring, beautiful, young American Immigrants?

I truly believe the most important experience for a human being is to have the ability to learn. Educational learning as well as keeping a growth mindset are catalysts to bridging the gap between cultures. This way, we can understand each other better. I never want to stop learning, and one day I will never want to stop teaching.”

TheDream.US, which has provided more than 3,000 scholarships to students with DACA and TPS at more than 75 partner colleges in 15 states and Washington, DC, believes that all young people, regardless of where they were born, should have the opportunity to fulfill their potential, gain an education, and fully participate in the country that they call home. To date, the organization has committed more than $103 million in scholarship money for DREAMers.

Read through a story bank of TheDream.US Scholars here  

Find out more about TheDream.US here

Take original title or chose a different one.

Example: DREAMer of the Day

Proof read text:

– Take out initial date and place.

o Example:

▪ ORIGINAL: Washington, DC – TheDream.US, the nation’s largest college access and success program for undocumented immigrant youth, has launched a “DREAMer of the Day” feature – a daily profile of a TheDream.US-affiliated Scholar whose story offers a powerful example why Congress passing legislation resolving the crisis facing DREAMers and TPS holders will be good for America.

▪ AMENDED: – TheDream.US, the nation’s largest college access and success program for undocumented immigrant youth, has launched a “DREAMer of the Day” feature – a daily profile of a TheDream.US-affiliated Scholar whose story offers a powerful example why Congress passing legislation resolving the crisis facing DREAMers and TPS holders will be good for America.

Doron Levin weighing in on President Trump’s comments

SiriusXM host Doron Levin weighing in on President Trump’s comments – during his State of the Union address – on Detroit and the auto industry.

AUDIO: https://soundcloud.com/siriusxm-news-issues/doron-talks-sotu

“…State of the Union message from President Donald Trump and he did take the time to make a shout out to Detroit and to the auto industry.

I think we should talk about it because he did say in his speech that because of him the country was building and expanding auto plants, something that we haven’t seen in decades. That was one of his assertions.

He also said that very soon auto plants were going to be opening all over because of him.

With the President you always have to fact-check what he said. Afterwards he said that this was the biggest audience that had ever heard a State of the Union address and, of course, that wasn’t true but, we have to fact-check this stuff about the auto industry too. It turns out that while he does want to take credit for this there’s some good and there’s some bad.

The good is that it is true that we have had a big boom in the stock market and in personal wealth since he came into office. I don’t how much that can hang on him but it’s going to be that we can buy more cars, probably.

And that people are feeling optimistic and that’s going to be very good for the car makers. And I love it when the car makers are doing well because it means they can invest more in new models and we can get more features. And the whole mobility scene gets better because people are feeling confident and buying new vehicles so, that’s very good news.

As far as the assertion, that we’re now going to have a bunch of new car plants because of him let’s look at that.

In the last 20 years, and this is mostly when he’s not been President, global car makers have actually invested 75 billion dollars in the United States. What we need to understand is that the United States is a very good place to not only to build vehicles but also to export vehicles that’s because this is a very profitable market, it’s because we have very favorable trade agreements and I hope that doesn’t get messed up with the North American Free Trade Agreement being renegotiated in a way that isn’t advantageous to us. President Trump has said that he’s going to re-negotiate that and that has to be done carefully because that has worked out for us.

We have a new Volvo plant coming soon to South Carolina; a new Mercedes Benz plant in Alabama; we have additions coming to the BMW plant in South Carolina; Toyota and Mazda are going to build a new plant in Alabama; and even Chrysler is going to bring back some of its truck production from Mexico to Michigan, which is good news for the UAW and good news for the Michigan economy.

So, yes, the place is great for building vehicles and I think the Presdient was right to highlight that stuff but, we can’t say that it’s basically because of him. It’s been happening, actually a trend, a long-term trend, long before he even announced he was going to run for President so, let’s put that in some kind of perspective.

The important thing about this truck deal that Chrysler has now in Michigan is that it’s really being done as a hedge against the possibility that trade agreements that made it advantageous to build trucks in Mexico and bring them back to the United States may change. And if that changes then Chrysler needs to be building those trucks in the United States and it’s important for the administration not to mess up trade rules.

Now, I know a lot of you tune in to this show to hear about cars but, part of hearing about cars is also hearing about how they’re built, where they’re built, why they’re exported to where they are, and why they’re imported to where they are and a lot of that has to do with the trade rules. So, we look forward to all of that being negotiated in a way that’s advantegous to us in the United States and I think that that’s going to happen.

I don’t foresee that the North American Free Trade Agreement or some of the other agreements that allow cars and trucks to be built in Canada, United States, and Mexico and parts built in those places that allow them to go across the borders more or less without tariff I don’t foresee that changing. One thing that might happen, that the administration may do, and this is why no one really wants to contradict the President on this and get him upset, is a rethinking of some of the stricter fuel-efficiency rules and that could mean that we could see, soon, a relaxation which the auto makers would like, because they don’t want to bring in electric vehicles more quickly than people actually want to drive them.”

SiriusXM’s “In The Driver’s Seat with Doron Levin” airs every Saturday at 12:00pm ET on SiriusXM Insight channel 121.

Influential Women at Wellesley

This January, Wellesley College will host several of the world’s most influential women, including Sally Yates, Wendy Sherman, Andrea Mitchell, Katharine H.S. Moon, and Madeleine Albright herself, as part of the Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs ninth annual Wintersession, a three-week intensive program at Wellesley that educates the next generation of women leaders.

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 Highlighted Events

●      On January 8, from 10:45 a.m. to 12 p.m., the Albright Institute welcomes Sally Yates, former U.S. Deputy Attorney General (2015-2017). Yates will present a keynote talk, “Principles Not Policy: Essential Norms in Preserving the Rule of Law,” exploring the vital role of trust in creating stable and just societies. This event will be available via livestream.

●      On January 16, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., a group of North Korea experts will present “Beyond the Headlines: Understanding Korea,” led by Katharine Moon, Edith Stix Wasserman Professor of Asian Studies at Wellesley and nonresident senior fellow with Brookings. This event will be available via livestream.

●      On January 24, beginning at approximately 6:40 p.m., Secretary Albright will present a dinner dialogue entitled “In the Balance: Setting a Course to Restore Democratic Principles” with Wendy R. Sherman, senior counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and former U.S. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs (2011 to 2015). This event will be available via livestream.

●      On the final day of Wintersession, January 25, Secretary Albright will join Andrea Mitchell of NBC News speaking at the closing ceremony for Albright Fellows. This event will not be livestreamed. 

About the Albright Institute Wintersession

This year’s Albright Institute Wintersession will educate a cohort of 48 Wellesley student fellows representing 18 countries, 18 U.S. states, and 26 majors. Following two weeks of classes and panels led by prominent speakers, the fellows spend the final week of the program working together in interdisciplinary groups to develop solutions that address a critical world issue. This year’s theme is “Harnessing the Power of Technology: Navigating Truth and Trust in a World Transformed.”

“The Albright Institute is educating the next generation of global leaders—with its interdisciplinary, experiential approach to learning and its expert faculty, talented students, and the powerful and influential women leaders it brings to Wellesley’s campus, including former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright, Wellesley Class of 1959,” said Wellesley College President Paula A. Johnson. “The global problems we face—including threats to democracy, climate change, and poverty and income inequality—are increasingly complex and fraught, with the potential for worldwide repercussions. The Albright Institute is preparing its students to meet tomorrow’s challenges head on, and the world has never needed them more.”

More on Albright Institute Featured Speakers

Sally Yates, a 27-year veteran of the U.S. Department of Justice, spent more than two decades as a federal prosecutor in Georgia and was appointed U.S. Deputy Attorney General in 2015 by President Barack Obama. She was named acting U.S. Attorney General in January 2017 and served in that position for just 10 days before being fired for defying the Trump administration’s controversial travel ban—an executive order temporarily halting entrance to the United States from seven predominantly Muslim countries. Yates’s talk, “Principles Not Policy: Essential Norms in Preserving the Rule of Law,” will be moderated Lawrence A. Rosenwald, Anne Pierce Rogers Professor of American Literature, professor of English, and co-director of the Peace and Justice Studies program at Wellesley. The talk will be followed by a lunch with the fellows, who will have an opportunity to converse with Yates directly.

Albright Institute Director Joanne Murray said, “No one represents the mission of the Albright Institute better than Sally Yates—cultivating in fellows the habits of principled clarity, bold service, and courageous action to shape a better world.”

During her time as undersecretary of state, Wendy Sherman was the lead U.S. negotiator in the landmark nuclear agreement with Iran. For this and other diplomatic accomplishments, Sherman was awarded the National Security Medal by President Obama. According to Murray, Sherman “demonstrated the ability to bring opposing countries to consensus and to forge trust. She will share what deliberative negotiating means as Albright Fellows sort through potential policy solutions to the problems posed to them.”

The January 16 panel led by Professor Katharine H.S. Moon, “Beyond the Headlines: Understanding Korea,” will feature three panelists: Jieun Baek, a Ph.D. candidate in public policy at the University of Oxford, former research fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard, and author of North Korea’s Hidden Revolution: How the Information Underground is Transforming a Closed SocietyMelissa Hanham, senior research associate in the East Asia Nonproliferation Program; and a third panelist, who works on a variety of causes related to human rights issues, including rights for North Korean defectors in South Korea.

In addition to Yates, Sherman, and these experts, this year’s program will feature an array of other distinguished individuals, including Anne Richard, U.S. assistant secretary of state for population, refugees, and migration from 2012 to 2017, and Jonathan Zittrain, George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and professor at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and faculty director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society.

About the Albright Institute

The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs at Wellesley College supports the College’s mission of educating students for leadership in an increasingly complex and interconnected global environment. The program combines the intellectual resources of faculty from Wellesley, researchers from the Wellesley Centers for Women, and leading alumnae and other practitioners and policy makers in the fields of international relations and public policy.

About Wellesley College

Since 1875, Wellesley College has been a leader in providing an excellent liberal arts education for women who will make a difference in the world. Its 500-acre campus near Boston is home to 2,400 undergraduate students from all 50 states and 75 countries.

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