Posts tagged with "doctor"

Easy Home Menopause Remedies to Treat Menopausal Symptoms

Mеnораuѕе іѕ thе stage thаt іѕ hарреnіng іn аll wоmеn whеn thе рrоduсtіоn оf еѕtrоgеn frоm thе ovaries grаduаllу diminishes аnd еvеntuаllу tеrmіnаtеѕ. Nоwаdауѕ, mаnу wоmеn аrе lооkіng fоr mеnораuѕаl rеmеdіеѕ, but thеу fосuѕ оn ѕоmе оf thе mоѕt trоublіng symptoms оf mеnораuѕе, ѕuсh аѕ nіght ѕwеаtѕ аnd hоt flаѕhеѕ.

Thеrе аrе mаnу remedies available fоr mеnораuѕе thаt саn reduce thе unрlеаѕаnt ѕуmрtоmѕ оf mеnораuѕе аnd prevent уоu frоm mеltіng, іnсludіng ѕоmе ѕіmрlе tірѕ thаt уоu саn рut іntо рrасtісе daily. Below treatment can relieve symptoms of menopause.

Kеер уоur menopause аt hоmе frіеndlу.

If уоu аrе еxреrіеnсіng mеnораuѕаl ѕуmрtоmѕ, уоu саn іnсrеаѕе thе vоlumе оf air іn thе summer аnd dесrеаѕе thе hеаt іn thе wіntеr, ѕо thаt уоu аrе nоt аѕ lіkеlу tо еxреrіеnсе еxсеѕѕіvе hеаt wаvеѕ. If уоu аrе еxреrіеnсіng hоt flаѕhеѕ, thе іntеrnаl tеmреrаturе оf уоur bоdу саn rіѕе uр tо 8 dеgrееѕ fоr uр tо 3 mіnutеѕ! Recovery frоm hеаt wаvеѕ саn tаkе muсh lоngеr іf уоur home іѕ tоо hоt. Sо kеер thіngѕ сооl оn thе оutѕіdе ѕо уоur bоdу саn rесоvеr internally durіng thе mеnораuѕе phase.

Trу tо аvоіd stress аnd саffеіnе, іf роѕѕіblе, durіng menopause. Thіѕ іѕ bесаuѕе thеѕе twо thіngѕ nоt оnlу саuѕе mеnораuѕе ѕуmрtоmѕ lіkе hоt flаѕhеѕ аnd nіght ѕwеаtѕ, thеу саn аlѕо саuѕе thе mооdіnеѕѕ аnd іrrіtаbіlіtу оf menopause. Sоmе оf thе bеѕt mеnораuѕаl rеmеdіеѕ, ѕuсh аѕ mеdіtаtіоn аnd mаѕѕаgе, саn hеlр rеduсе hеаrt rаtе аnd rеlіеvе muѕсlе, ѕо mеnораuѕе ѕуmрtоmѕ, іnсludіng hоt flаѕhеѕ аnd hеаrt раlріtаtіоnѕ, аrе lеѕѕ lіkеlу.

Durіng thе mеnораuѕаl рhаѕе, уоu саn ѕtосk ѕоmе fооdѕ thаt соntаіn nаturаl еѕtrоgеnѕ ѕuсh аѕ ѕоуbеаnѕ, аlfаlfа ѕрrоutѕ, оаtѕ, рарауа, аnd оlіvе оіl іn thе rеfrіgеrаtоr. Tаkіng thеѕе fооdѕ wіll hеlр bаlаnсе thе lеvеlѕ оf еѕtrоgеn іn уоur bоdу, rеѕultіng іn fewer fluсtuаtіоnѕ іn thе ѕуmрtоmѕ оf mеnораuѕе.

Eаѕу Hоmеmаdе Remedies fоr Mеnораuѕе

Bу tаkіng care оf уоur оvеrаll health, уоu саn ѕоmеwhаt rеlіеvе thе ѕуmрtоmѕ оf mеnораuѕе. Thіѕ іnсludеѕ ѕuррlеmеntіng уоur dіеt wіth сеrtаіn mіnеrаlѕ аnd vіtаmіnѕ thаt уоur bоdу lоѕеѕ durіng thе mеnораuѕаl рhаѕе. Cоnѕumіng vіtаmіn E еvеrу dау wіll hеlр rеlіеvе nіght ѕwеаtѕ аnd hоt flаѕhеѕ. Tаkіng vіtаmіn D аnd саlсіum wіll аlѕо rеduсе thе ѕуmрtоmѕ оf mеnораuѕе аnd hеlр уоu ѕlеер еаѕіеr bу рrоtесtіng уоur bоnеѕ.

Yоu саn аlѕо gеt ѕоmе remedies tо trеаt thе ѕуmрtоmѕ оf mеnораuѕе іn thе kіtсhеn сlоѕеt аnd thе lосаl hеrbаl ѕtоrе, whісh іѕ еаѕу tо dо. Fоr еxаmрlе, tаkіng 800 mg оf еvеnіng рrіmrоѕе оіl thrее tіmеѕ a dау wіth рlеntу оf wаtеr wіll trеаt thе hоt flаѕhеѕ аnd kеер nіght ѕwеаtѕ аt bау. 2 ounces оf bееt juісе 3 оr 4 tіmеѕ a dау wіll аlѕо rеlіеvе thе ѕуmрtоmѕ оf mеnораuѕе.

Cоnѕіdеr ѕwіtсhіng tо Sаrѕараrіllа оr Black Cоhоѕh іf уоu lіkе tо drink herbal tеаѕ. Tаkіng a сuр оf аnу оf thеѕе hеrbаl tеаѕ twісе a dау іѕ оnе оf thе bеѕt mеnораuѕе rеmеdіеѕ fоr trеаtіng thе ѕуmрtоmѕ оf mеnораuѕе. Thеу аrе ѕооthіng tо уоur nеrvеѕ thаt hеlр уоu dеаl mоrе еаѕіlу wіth hеаt dіѕсоmfоrt аnd оthеr ѕуmрtоmѕ оf mеnораuѕе symptoms.

Othеr рорulаr treatment can relieve symptoms аrе tаkіng thе hеrbаl саllеd Lісоrісе. Yоu саn еvеn vіѕіt thе hеаlth fооd ѕtоrе аnd lооk fоr lісоrісе роwdеr іn сарѕulеѕ оr tаkе a tеаѕрооn оf thе роwdеr a dау, fоllоwеd bу a full glass оf wаtеr. Yоu саn drіnk hеrbаl tеа wіth a little wаrm mіlk tо hеlр уоu fаll аѕlеер mоrе ԛuісklу durіng mеnораuѕе.

Brave New Medicine: A Doctor’s Unconventional Path to Healing Her Autoimmune Illness

By Cynthia Li, MD

DOCTOR-AS-PATIENT MEMOIR REIMAGINES THE ART AND SCIENCE OF HEALING

“In Cynthia Li’s spellbinding book, we encounter the moving story of a physician struggling with her own autoimmune illness. Li’s writing is so intimate — and so exacting — that it cuts like a knife. She raises fundamental questions about the future of medicine, her own future, and about being a doctor and a patient at the same time. The result is a beautiful book that will be read and remembered for years to come.”—Siddhartha Mukherjee, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Emperor of All Maladies

Millions of people worldwide are affected by autoimmune diseases. Some are common, like Hashimoto’s thyroid disease, and others are mysterious conditions like chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and dysautonomia. While the latter are gaining attention, patients struggling with these ailments are often dismissed by their doctors, families, and friends. The medical community often refers to them as “difficult patients” because they don’t follow the traditional checkboxes of illness and their symptoms can elude standard testing. When one doctor develops a disabling autoimmune illness and becomes that “difficult patient” herself, the beliefs and methods she once swore by collapse.

Brave New Medicine: A Doctor’s Unconventional Path to Healing Her Autoimmune Illness  takes us on an intimate whirlwind of a journey with Cynthia Li—a doctor who seemingly had it all until her health took an unexpected turn, leading her to question her medical training. Dr. Li’s story is raw, honest, and vulnerable as she describes her descent first into an autoimmune thyroid condition, then mysterious symptoms that leave her housebound with no end in sight. Test after test came back “within normal limits,” baffling her doctors—and herself. Housebound with two young daughters, Dr. Li began a solo odyssey from her living room couch to discover a way to heal.

Dr. Li is forced to dive into the root causes of her illness, and to learn to unlock her body’s innate intelligence and wholeness. Dr. Li relates her story with the insight of a scientist, and the humility and candor of a patient, exploring the emotional and spiritual shifts beyond the physical body. What’s more, she chronicles 15 practical steps on “how to get off the couch,” and expands this list in Part III, so fellow sufferers can find the wisdom and inspiration to begin their personal healing journeys.

“I entered my health challenges as a doctor, and came out a healer,” says Dr. Li.  “I hadn’t known the difference before. I first had to unlearn the idea that chronic diseases are determined by a fixed number or a positive test result, or fulfilling specific criteria. So the body, I realized, isn’t a three-dimensional puzzle to be solved. It’s a living, dynamic ecosystem to be nurtured. At the heart of my healing was learning to embrace my sensitive nature.”

Drawing on cutting-edge science, ancient healing arts, and the power of intuition, Brave New Medicine offers support, validation, and a new perspective for doctors and patients alike. This is the first memoir by a doctor evaluating her own complex illness through the lens of an integrative and root-cause paradigm. While many books are written by laypeople on mysterious illnesses, having a doctor go through this journey, explaining it from the inside-out, embracing the art of intuition—and pairing it with the analytical mind—offers a whole new dimension. Dr. Li explores epigenetics, neuroplasticity, the microbiome, environmental health, and functional medicine along with acupuncture, ancestral cooking, qigong, and grief rituals to get down to the root causes of her illness. In healing herself, she learns she is healing her family, too.

“The simplest step in healing is also the hardest: believing it is possible,” adds Dr. Li.  “An insidious process often happens with chronic disease, when the illness becomes your identity, especially when it’s an all-encompassing, debilitating condition like autoimmunity, chronic fatigue syndrome, or advanced cancer. The key to shifting our beliefs is to step outside of the prognoses and diagnoses long enough to tap into the innate intelligence within our cells. Because the body is where the subconscious lives, and where symptoms are trying to tell us the imbalances that are brewing. This isn’t positive thinking. It’s physiology at its best. By addressing root causes, reducing inflammation, restoring imbalances, and connecting to something greater beyond us, healing happens as a side-effect.

About the Author:

CYNTHIA LI, MD graduated from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and has practiced internal medicine in settings as diverse as Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, San Francisco General Hospital, St. Anthony Medical Clinic for the homeless, and Doctors Without Borders in rural China. Her own health challenges led her to functional medicine, a paradigm that addresses the root causes of chronic conditions. She currently serves on the faculty of the Healer’s Art Program at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, and has a private practice. She lives in Berkeley, CA with her husband and their two daughters.

Connect with Cynthia Li, MD on Facebook @dr.cynthia.li and visit www.cynthialimd.com.

 

Brave New Medicine: A Doctor’s Unconventional Path to Healing Her Autoimmune Illness is available September 1, 2019 in paperback at Amazon and other retailers.

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Here’s How You Could Restore Your Hairline Without Surgery

Of all the types of hair transplant available today, follicular unit extraction, or “FUE,” is the most popular. Much of FUE’s popularity comes from the fact it promises quality results with minimally invasive surgery. This makes it a great alternative to its predecessor, follicular unit transplantation (FUT). FUT is still available, but requires extensive surgery. Those who don’t want the pain and long recovery time associated with FUT generally opt for the minimally invasive FUE. Of course, if you would rather avoid going the surgical route altogether, there is an alternative to both FUT and FUE. That alternative is platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy. We’ll be discussing PRP therapy in this article to help you decide if it’s the best type of hair transplant for you.

What Is PRP Therapy?

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy has applications far beyond the realm of hair restoration. It is often used as a means of combating joint pain and sports injuries without surgery. By flooding an affected area with concentrated platelets, tissue damage may be repaired, inflammation may be reduced, and yes, hair follicles may be stimulated.

How Does It Work?

The PRP therapy process begins with the extraction of blood from the patient. This blood is then separated into three parts, namely red blood cells, platelet-poor plasma, and platelet-rich plasma. The concentrated platelet-rich plasma can contain as much as ten times more platelets than regular blood. Once it has been treated, the blood is injected into the part of the patient’s body which requires attention. In the case of hair loss, the platelet-rich plasma is injected into the patient’s scalp. This may sound a little unpleasant, but it is really quite painless.

How Much Does It Cost?

As well as being a non-surgical alternative to FUE and FUT, PRP therapy boasts the advantage of being one of the most affordable types of hair transplant available. PRP therapy costs begin at about $500 per session in the United States. They can reach as high as $2000 per session, which is still significantly less than FUE treatment in the USA. If you were to travel to Turkey for your hair transplant, as an increasing number of follicly-challenged Americans do, you would be able to secure PRP therapy for even less than it costs in the United States.

But Does It Really Work?

While there are some people who swear by PRP therapy, there is ongoing debate as to its effectiveness, especially when it comes to tackling hair loss. According to this article, there is no clear evidence that PRP therapy can reverse the effects of hair loss. For this reason, you may want to consider resigning yourself to surgery and going with FUE or FUT treatment instead. If the high price of such procedures is a primary factor in your decision to pursue PRP therapy instead, we encourage you to explore the option of traveling to Turkey for your hair transplant. As mentioned above, Turkish hair restoration clinics offer PRP therapy for a fraction of the cost of their Western counterparts. These low prices extend to other methods of hair restoration, including FUE and FUT. In fact, a medical tourist in Turkey can expect to pay up to 50% less than they would have had they undergone FUE in their home country.

Wellness Expert Shares Personal Struggle with Addiction & Depression

ADDICITION. Doesn’t discriminate.
ANXIETY. Indifferent to credentials and achievements.
DEPRESSION. Blind to where you live.

By: Dr. Natacha D. Nelson D.C, M.A.

“Look at you, your parents should be disgusted by you”, voices whispered solely for my ears.

“Your black daddy and your white mommy should be ashamed, to get married, to have you…”, their unapologetic words punctured my naive heart. The seed planted.

“A half breed, black girl shouldn’t be raised by a foreign, white woman. You should be taken and given to a proper home”. Their sentiments pierced every cell of my seven year old body. The terror became real.

***

I Attended a private high school and college. And I was an addict. An eating disorder, compulsive exercise and alcohol consumed my life. Desperate to distract myself from painful and uncomfortable feelings, the addictions led to academic probation and ultimately, dismissal from college.

Determined to become successful, I redeemed myself as the doctor of a large successful practice. I became an internationally competing athlete, married, had a family and good friends around me. None of my achievements dissolved the terror restless below the surface. The image I portrayed eclipsed my fear. Not even I noticed the hibernating rumblings.

Skilled at detecting possible threats against me or my mom (whether real or imagined) I blotted out the physical and emotional consequences of undetected anxiety growing fierce. My duty as a protector and provider devoured my time, money, energy and resources. In attempt to thwart perceived threats, I bankrupt myself; physically, emotionally, spiritually and financially. Unable to force myself out of bed, depression ensued.

The proverbial earthquake jolted my life. Demolishing the comfortable walls I erected for safety. Raw and vulnerable, I allowed myself to feel the heartbreak, the grief and the rage. Courageously, I engaged one feeling, one emotion, at a time. Finally willing to acknowledging the terror and pain, I desperately tried circumvent.

Giving my hurt permission to breathe, I began to write. And the healing balm, called Love, soothed my aching heart. Through writing, I was able to sift through four decades of actions and behaviors of my life. Eventually, the “A-Ha” moment revealed itself to me.

*****

The insight that my choices and decisions were unconsciously driven by the need to prove to myself and others, that I was lovable. I wanted to feel accepted, at least tolerated enough, to dissuade others from harming me or my mom.

Unknowingly, my efforts could never hush the unloved parts of me I refused to accept. Other people’s beliefs- about me, my parents and my life- I accepted as true. As long as I held the misbelief that I was unlovable, nothing I could do would override my inner judgments of myself. My outward actions would follow my unconscious beliefs.

My only mistake was to believe the false words of strangers and neighbors. Accepting their judgments as true and accurate. Believing I was bad, wrong, worthless and to be ashamed of. My parents’ marriage-one year after interracial marriage was legalized- to some, was deemed a disgust and my black and white mixed skin was a disgrace.

Once I forgave myself, for choices I made from fear and misinterpretations about myself, the healing began. I could not prove I was loveable if I didn’t believe I was. Accepting I am loveable, I no longer felt the need to prove it; not to myself, to my parents, to anyone. I forgave myself for buying into the unkind words of strangers and neighbors. I Forgave myself for the actions and behaviors I engaged in as a result of the misinterpretations I believed about myself. I Forgave my parents for the mistakes I believed they made in raising me. And forgave the authority figures of my childhood whose unkind words hurt me.

Addictions thwarted my college experience.

Anxiety bankrupt me.

Depression forced me to look at every aspect of my life, lovingly guiding me through the necessary emotional process. The healing work was worth the time and effort. I am finally free.

To you, Beloved Reader. You, too, are loved, are loveable and your life matters.

With Loving,
Natacha.

To learn more about my story, my services, visit:
www.adancingzebra.com
www.lifedoctor.guru
“Finding Courage to Let YOU Out” is available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

About the author
Dr. Natacha D. Nelson D.C, M.A., has dedicated her career to understanding the connections between physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being through principles of Chiropractic and Spiritual Psychology. A practicing chiropractor for over 20 years, she is the owner of Inside Out Wellness Center, as well as a former professional beach volleyball player and advisor on health and wellness for the Santa Clara Fire and Menlo-Atherton Police Departments. She is a Mental Health and Wellness consultant and educator who keeps up on the latest research and attends continuing education seminars and scientific symposia, and has a master’s degree in Spiritual Psychology. She lives in Los Angeles, with her daughter.

How To Operate A Successful Medical Facility

Running a medical facility is incredibly important and noble work, and it can feel fantastic to make a difference to and save people’s lives every single day. On top of this, this will always be an industry that is in demand, which means it can be secure and lucrative work too. Running a successful medical facility is certainly not an easy task. You need to run the facility like a business while also providing the best possible care for your patients, which can be a tricky tightrope to walk. Below are a few points for running a successful medical facility.

1. Create A Strong Brand

Branding is the best way to differentiate yourself from the competition and show people your practice. In addition to the company logo, slogan, color scheme, and other branding factors, this will also involve how you welcome people through the door, how phones are answered and the general atmosphere that you want to create inside.

2. Recruit Carefully

In order to succeed in this industry, you need to provide an excellent level of care, which will mean having highly skilled employees at every level of the organization. In addition to attracting top talent, you will also need to look after your staff and keep them happy and motivated. It can be challenging in this industry because it is highly demanding, stressful and time-consuming work.

3. Purchase The Best Equipment

In addition to staff, being able to provide the best level of care will also involve having the latest and best medical equipment. Medical device engineering firms like DeviceLab provide prototypes of medical equipment which can help you to find the best products for your particular facility and stay ahead of the curve. In addition to medical equipment, utilizing the right software will help you to streamline the operation, reduce the workload of your staff and cut down on errors.

4. Invest In Marketing

As with any type of online business, online marketing is hugely important, along with having a high-quality website and being active on social media channels. It can increase brand awareness and allow you to directly communicate with the world and show why they should choose your facility over the competition. In addition to online marketing, you should also be looking at offline marketing as you will mainly be targeting people in the local area. This will involve traditional marketing such as adverts in the local paper but also by getting involved with the local community, holding local events and anything to get the face of the company out there.

Running a successful medical facility is a unique challenge as it is not like any other type of business. The key to success is providing the best level of care for your patients so that you can develop a good track record and show why people should choose your company over the competition. You can do this with the above tips, and when you start to find success, you will also find that this is incredibly rewarding work too.

Getting to the Heart of the Problem

Although it is well known that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability among all Americans, there is still a misconception that it primarily affects older, white men.

The truth is, the risks are even higher for African Americans. African Americans have higher rates of heart disease risk factors such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Currently, 44% of African American men and 48% of African American women have some form of heart disease in the U.S.

Experts say there are several reasons why heart disease disproportionally affects the black community ranging from genetic to environmental factors. There are simple ways to control certain risk factors to reduce your risk for heart disease – it can be as simple as changing your daily habits.

Lifestyle Changes Can Include:
-Healthy diet
-Be physically active every day
-Reduce stress
-Quit smoking

During Heart Health Month, Dr. Wayne Batchelor, an interventional cardiologist and member of the Association of Black Cardiologists, is available to explain what you need to know if you have a risk factor that’s out of your control, how to talk to your doctor and the latest advancements in treatment options.

5 Hormone Disruptors

The 5 Biggest Disruptors

As 2019 dawns, some people are taking a “new year-new you” approach. They’re determined to make self-improvements that provide a fresh, positive outlook and strong sense of well-being.

But sometimes health factors undermine those good intentions, such as depression and its link to hormone imbalances. There are myriad ways both men and women suffer adverse effects to their hormones, says Don Colbert, M.D., and many of them are avoidable.

“We are exposed to thousands of toxic chemicals on a regular basis in the air, water and food,” says Colbert, author of Dr. Colbert’s Hormone Health Zone. “Some of them are hormone disruptors because they disturb your endocrine system, wreaking havoc and creating hormonal imbalances.

“Not only are the effects of all these disruptors depressing to think about; they actually cause depression, along with countless other ailments such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and more. But the basic principle is this: decreasing the number of disruptions will improve your health.”

Dr. Colbert breaks down the top hormone disruptors affecting men and women along with ways to minimize the disruption or stop it:

Lifestyle choices.

“Whether it’s weight gain and a lack of exercise, anger and unforgiveness, drinking too much alcohol or some other thing that can be controlled, your hormone levels drop and you begin a slow slide to poorer health,” Dr. Colbert says. “Make better choices, and that dramatically decreases the chances of having any hormone deficiency symptoms.”

Medications.

Medications affect the body’s cells, and sometimes side effects manifest in major problems. For example, Dr. Colbert cites Mayo Clinic research showing a prescription statin drug that lowered cholesterol could result in liver damage, memory loss or type 2 diabetes. “I estimate that 55 percent of the entire US population is taking pills that directly and negatively affect hormone levels,” Dr. Colbert says. “Get off these harmful medications you hate.”

Things you touch.

Chemicals entering the body through the skin can cause long-term damage. Dr. Colbert notes phthalates, disruptors found in household cleaners, cosmetics, toys and numerous other products. “Phthalates negatively affect both men’s and women’s ability to use the testosterone that is in our bodies,” Dr. Colbert says. “Another is BPA (bisphenol A), found on the inside of metal-canned foods and plastic food-storing containers. Specifically, BPA has been found to cause or contribute to cancer, fertility problems, developmental issues and heart disease. I recommend buying glass jars of food and storing in ceramic containers.”

Diet deficiencies.

“The standard American diet is usually low in key nutrients that support a healthy thyroid,” Dr. Colbert says. “Many patients with hormone imbalances have low iodine. The best solution is eat more vegetables, ideally raw or steamed.”

Aging.

Dr. Colbert says estrogen levels for women begin to decline around the age of 50; for men, testosterone levels can drop low around age 45-50. “Aging is a natural combatant as a hormone disruptor,” he says, “but we can slow the acceleration of the effects of aging by optimizing our hormones. Healthy habits can make a huge difference.”

“Symptoms of serious problems indicated by hormonal imbalance can be reversed by those who focus on health in their diet, lifestyle and living environment,” Dr. Colbert says. “Then they can enable all of their systems to function optimally.”

About Don Colbert, M.D.

Don Colbert, M.D. is the author of Dr. Colbert’s Hormone Health Zone. He has been a board-certified family practice doctor for more than 25 years and has offices in Orlando, Fla., and Dallas. The author of over 40 books, he wrote two New York Times best-sellers – The Seven Pillars of Health and Dr. Colbert’s “I Can Do This” Diet – has sold more than 10 million books and treated 50,000-plus patients. Dr. Colbert is a frequent show guest of Christian leaders Joyce Meyer, John Hagee, and Kenneth Copeland and has been featured on The Dr. Oz Show, Fox News, ABC World News Tonight, and in periodicals such as Newsweek and Reader’s Digest.

CBD is the Alternative

Multiple sclerosis, known as MS, is an unpredictable and often disabling disease that disrupts the flow of information between the brain and body. According to the National MS Society, more than 2.3 million people are affected by MS worldwide.

Celeste Miranda, CEO and founder of CBD Expo Tour and MACE Media Group, was diagnosed at 40 years old with MS and sought out CBD as a natural healing remedy. Celeste is the woman changing how the world views cannabis products and is on a mission to educate the public on the power of CBD. For Celeste, her experience with CBD and struggle with MS is a personal one. She believes that CBD is not a last result but should be the first solution.

Check out our interview below with Celeste talking about all things MS, CBD and the upcoming 2019 CBD Expo Tour.

1. Please tell us about how you were diagnosed with MS.

About eight years ago, I woke up in the morning and could not feel anything from my waist down. I could move and walk normally but when I would scratch my leg, I couldn’t feel myself doing it. I went into the emergency room and about 16 hours later, I was told that I had MS and had three lesions on my brain and two on my spine.

2. What are some of the difficulties and symptoms that you experienced with MS?

The main symptoms that I experience with MS are muscle spasticity, fatigue and brain fog.

3. What medicines or therapies did you use to treat MS before trying CBD?

I was originally prescribed two medications; one almost gave me a rare brain infection and the other wasn’t strong enough so it caused a bunch of relapses. I was also prescribed a multitude of muscle relaxers to help my muscle spasticity.

4. What brought you to seek out CBD as a cure for your MS?

I hated the feeling of being on muscle relaxers and felt like I couldn’t function while on them. I had a client at the time that was a producer of a CBD gum and he offered to send me some to try out. I would take it at the same time that I would normally have taken a muscle relaxer when I was starting to get spasticity in my legs from the MS. I tried the gum and within 10 minutes, my spacitiy went away, completely.

From there, I started researching CBD and this was as new forms started coming out – gummy bears, oils, and things like that. So I got completely off all the muscle relaxers and to this day, I am only on my monthly infusions of Tysabri and CBD.

It took me a lot of research and time to learn the correct dosage for my body. In the morning, I do a smaller dosage and then in the evening, when I know my spasticity usually gets bad, I’ll take a larger dosage. I’ve got it extremely dialed in and those are the only two things I am currently on; the tysabri and CBD. Hopefully, one day we’ll know that it helps enough in lesion prevention that I can get off the Tysabri but for now I am on both and am thrilled because I am no longer on muscle relaxers.

5. What was your doctors reaction to you taking CBD?

The doctors knew from the beginning how I got off the muscle relaxers but they originally did not say much. About three years ago, my doctor at Stanford called me and told me that they had gotten approved for research on MS and CBD and needed my help to get it off the ground. Within two weeks, we were making a bunch of noise and had money coming in to reach the $150,000 goal. At that point, my doctor called me and told me to stop immediately. When I asked why, she told me that Stanford had just lost one of their biggest financial contributors over this and that she had no choice in the manner. To say the least, for the last three years I have been a patient at Cedars-Sinai. I guess in the end, money talks.

6. Tell us about your background and how your experience with MS & CBD ties into your career in the cannabis industry?

Ironically, it all happened at the same time. I had switched my marketing firm from “mainstream” to cannabis shortly after being diagnosed with MS. They were unrelated, but the timing was close.

7. Tell us why you started CBD Expo?

For me, it is personal and the whole purpose of the CBD Expo Tour is education. There are so many questions surrounding CBD and people are very confused about it. Our main goal is to provide education and also to get exposure to some of the products that we think are the best ones out there.

8. What is CBD Expo?

CBD Expo is not like your normal trade show – we focus on both the medical and education sides of our event. We are not a fly by night company, we are here for the long run. We chose our locations for the 2019 Expo strategically because we want to create a surge of knowledge into these communities. So for example, our next conference that is coming up, CBD Expo Midwest in Indianapolis, was chosen because we saw a large amount of sales coming from Indiana from our first show in the West. We took a poll from our exhibitors and it turned out that 70% of their sales were from Indiana. After finding this out, it only made sense to choose this region as our first destination for our 2019 tour.

9. What are the main highlights for the 2019 CBD Expo Tour?

All of our locations are themed and contain panels and carefully selected presentations to create a well-rounded show and meet the needs of each region.
-CBD Expo Midwest (Indianapolis, IN – March 15-16, 2019) focuses on CBD 101: Basic CBD Knowledge and Industry Trends.
-CBD Expo South (San Antonio, TX – June 28-29, 2019).
-CBD Expo Mountain (Denver, CO – October 11-12, 2019) focuses on compliance, regulation, investments and business.
-Cannabinoid + Natural Products (San Diego, CA – December 5-6) focuses on cannabinoid research and cannabinoid formulations.

We are very excited to for CBD Expo Tour 2019 and would like to encourage anyone who is interested in learning more about CBD from experts in the field or launching their own CBD business to join us. More information on the 2019 CBD Expo Tour can be found at https://cbdexpo.net/.

Check out Flawless CBD for an array of products.

Top Tips to Help Women Treat Carpal Tunnel

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, women are three times more likely to suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome than men, making even the most basic repetitive tasks like typing, using a computer, chopping vegetables and gardening painful. The associated pain or numbness in the hands and wrist that can radiate up the arm and hinder the ability to work is caused by the median or ulnar nerves in the wrist becoming compressed by repetitive motion. The good news is, the pain associated with carpel tunnel can be relieved without surgery. A good fitting wrist brace and a simple exercise, holding the arm out straight and flexing the hand at the wrist, can relieve the pressure on the nerve.

Testing for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

There are two definitive tests that physicians use to diagnose carpal tunnel: Tinel’s and Phalen’s.

 

  • The Tinel’s Test. If tapping on the underside of the wrist causes shooting pains in the hand, it is considered positive.
  • The Phalen’s Test. If the hands feel heavy, tingling, burning, or numb when holding both wrists in a back-to-back position in front of the body, with the wrists bent at 90 degrees for 90 seconds, it is considered positive.

 

Carpal tunnel is sometimes mistaken for thoracic outlet syndrome. The tightness, soreness and restrictions in the neck, shoulder, chest muscles and/or a slight shift in one of the ribs – often attributed to thoracic outlet syndrome – can actually result in symptoms much like carpal tunnel. The good news is that easing the symptoms of both carpal tunnel syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome may be accomplished with a correctly fitting wrist support.

Wrists are not one-size-fits-all. Women’s wrists are, on average, 10 percent narrower than men’s, so it’s important their wrist support is made just for them. The Wellgate for Women Perfect Fit Wrist Support, for example, helps to ease the painful symptoms of carpal tunnel, tendonitis, arthritis and sprains by keeping the wrist in a neutral position to relieve pressure on the median and ulnar nerves during the day and at night.

The American Physical Therapy Association offers these tips for women to limit their chances of getting carpal tunnel syndrome:

  • Consider using a wrist brace at night and when playing sports to support the wrist in a neutral position.
  • Take frequent breaks from activities that require repetitive motion, even cooking tasks.
  • Move only your fingers and keep your wrists straight when typing.
  • When typing, make sure your spine is flush with the chair back, your shoulders are relaxed, and your feet are flat on the floor.
  • Keep your computer monitor at eye level.

 

Women should not just assume they have to live with pain.

 

About the Author

Dr. Holly Herman has been a physical therapist for more than 43 years, with a full-time private practice in Cambridge, MA. Dr. Herman provides expert care for women and men seeking careful, considerate diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic and other medical conditions. She is dedicated to training physical therapy and other healthcare professionals worldwide.

 

Doctor Tries Fasting Trend

Real Doctor Tries the Intermittent Fasting Trend and Here’s What Happened https://tourocom.touro.edu/academics/faculty/harlem/niket-sonpal.php

There’s crash dieting, and then there’s intermittent fasting. Crash diets aren’t sustainable and rarely factor in healthy food options. Intermittent fasting on the other hand is gaining attention because people are seeing weight come off, and therefore stay with it. It’s being touted as the go-to way to lose 15, 20 pounds within a month or two. Is it just a popular hashtag or can the weight actually stay off leading millions of people to reach their weight goals? To get clarity, we spoke to Dr. Niket Sonpal who not only is Board Certified in Internal Medicine specializing in Gastroenterology; but lost 8 pounds his first week of intermittent fasting when he decided to do it himself. Here’s what he has to say about intermittent fasting.

What inspired your decision to do intermittent fasting?

I noticed the winter weight became the spring then summer weight and I wanted to take off extra pounds that I noticed had crept on. I was with friends talking about how they lost weight during Ramadan (would prefer religious observations) and that intermittent fasting was a “thing.” I rolled my eyes. I was skeptical. Then I went online and applied my doctor mind to the concepts I was reading about it and went for it.

There are several ways to go about intermittent fasting. Which way did you do it, when did you start and what was the result?

This is true. The way I chose, and the way I would imagine most people would try, is the one that calls for 16 hours of fasting with 8 hours of eating time per day. This basically means if your last meal of the day is 8pm you will have your first meal by noon the following day, free to eat until 8pm again. I figured since I sleep most of those hours, it wouldn’t be as tough as another option where you fast for 5 days and eat for 2 with a 500-800 calorie intake limit on those 2 days.

What were the challenges (if any) that you faced when intermittent fasting?

I live across the street from a bagel shop in New York City. I also have delicious New York pizza on every other corner. Cravings and temptation were there for me for sure. When I left my home and smelled those fresh bagels my brain said. “let’s eat.”

Coming at your intermittent fasting as a doctor, what were some things you were thinking about that others must consider too?

I thought when I would fast. When would be my 8-hour eating period. When we start caloric consumption right when we wake up we do better with weight loss. However, that would mean eating from 7 am until 4pm. This would require a later meal around 3pm. Then I thought, does my lifestyle better allow a 12 noon to 8pm food window?

I also thought about the physiological aspect to what happens to our bodies when we fast intermittently. For one thing, it facilitates weight loss by enhancing hormone function. Insulin levels also lower, plus there’s a rise in noradrenaline. This combination is what helps us to breakdown body fat for energy. While this all reads well on paper there is a lifestyle aspect to it that must be factored in. I’ll add that anyone with a condition should consult with their doctor before going all in on intermittent fasting.

Why do you think it is so difficult for people to fast? What are some of the common symptoms people feel when fasting and what causes them?

When people think of fasting they think of starvation and deprivation. They anticipate they will feel terrible will have a growling stomach, dull headaches, and a bad mood. While these are common symptoms felt at first when fasting, the 16/8 intermittent fasting option allows for food every day. When people see quick results, they stick with it.

What was your diet? What did you cut out and add in?

I looked at my schedule and my overall daily lifestyle and how food was involved. For people who live very hurried lifestyles, food is typically something that is grabbed fast on the go. When we approach food this way no diet will be sustainable. I realized this would require consistent changes in my behavior. It would also require me to get very mindful about what I was eating during the 8 hours of eating time. I chose to eat what I liked in moderation. So, if two slices of pizza twice per week was the lunchtime norm, I reduced to it to once slice. I still ate pasta just not as often and not as much. I also added in a lot more vegetables, proteins, healthy fats and cut out all fast food and soda. Hey, I’m a doctor, but also a human!

For those thinking about intermittent fasting, how would you advise them to proceed?

I would explain that at around the 2 to 4-week mark, someone may plateau. When you notice this don’t think this is the most weight you are able to lose. This is normal and if you are also exercising with weight or resistance training you may be building muscle mass. Pay attention to how clothes fit, body fat loss and how weight loss shows beyond the scale. Knowing how over time the body gets used to intermittent fasting and starts to store up all that is eaten, leading to less weight loss, I suggest resetting your body by eating small, healthy meals throughout the day for a week and then resuming the 16/8 intermittent fasting option again.

People may happily think that they can fast and then enjoy a big bowl of pasta or cheeseburger. What kinds of foods should people eat during intermittent fasting?

You can get results without cutting out your favorite foods which means enjoy that burger or pasta, I did! However, you can’t binge on fast food and think you’re going to make any lasting changes. You want to up your vegetable intake. Things like grilled zucchini or eggplant make for great sides to a piece of grilled chicken or steak. Avocados are a good staple for healthy fats and are versatile. There are loads of recipes out there so plan out your food options in advance, so you stick with it.

About the doctor:

Dr. Niket Sonpal is Assistant Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, Clinical instructor at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn and on the board of the NY‐American College of Physicians (NYACP). He is also the associate program director for the Internal Medicine residency program at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center. He is trained in Internal medicine, Gastroenterology and has a focus on Men’s and Women’s health.