Posts tagged with "doctor"

Getting to the Heart of the Problem

Although it is well known that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability among all Americans, there is still a misconception that it primarily affects older, white men.

The truth is, the risks are even higher for African Americans. African Americans have higher rates of heart disease risk factors such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Currently, 44% of African American men and 48% of African American women have some form of heart disease in the U.S.

Experts say there are several reasons why heart disease disproportionally affects the black community ranging from genetic to environmental factors. There are simple ways to control certain risk factors to reduce your risk for heart disease – it can be as simple as changing your daily habits.

Lifestyle Changes Can Include:
-Healthy diet
-Be physically active every day
-Reduce stress
-Quit smoking

During Heart Health Month, Dr. Wayne Batchelor, an interventional cardiologist and member of the Association of Black Cardiologists, is available to explain what you need to know if you have a risk factor that’s out of your control, how to talk to your doctor and the latest advancements in treatment options.

5 Hormone Disruptors

The 5 Biggest Disruptors

As 2019 dawns, some people are taking a “new year-new you” approach. They’re determined to make self-improvements that provide a fresh, positive outlook and strong sense of well-being.

But sometimes health factors undermine those good intentions, such as depression and its link to hormone imbalances. There are myriad ways both men and women suffer adverse effects to their hormones, says Don Colbert, M.D., and many of them are avoidable.

“We are exposed to thousands of toxic chemicals on a regular basis in the air, water and food,” says Colbert, author of Dr. Colbert’s Hormone Health Zone. “Some of them are hormone disruptors because they disturb your endocrine system, wreaking havoc and creating hormonal imbalances.

“Not only are the effects of all these disruptors depressing to think about; they actually cause depression, along with countless other ailments such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and more. But the basic principle is this: decreasing the number of disruptions will improve your health.”

Dr. Colbert breaks down the top hormone disruptors affecting men and women along with ways to minimize the disruption or stop it:

Lifestyle choices.

“Whether it’s weight gain and a lack of exercise, anger and unforgiveness, drinking too much alcohol or some other thing that can be controlled, your hormone levels drop and you begin a slow slide to poorer health,” Dr. Colbert says. “Make better choices, and that dramatically decreases the chances of having any hormone deficiency symptoms.”

Medications.

Medications affect the body’s cells, and sometimes side effects manifest in major problems. For example, Dr. Colbert cites Mayo Clinic research showing a prescription statin drug that lowered cholesterol could result in liver damage, memory loss or type 2 diabetes. “I estimate that 55 percent of the entire US population is taking pills that directly and negatively affect hormone levels,” Dr. Colbert says. “Get off these harmful medications you hate.”

Things you touch.

Chemicals entering the body through the skin can cause long-term damage. Dr. Colbert notes phthalates, disruptors found in household cleaners, cosmetics, toys and numerous other products. “Phthalates negatively affect both men’s and women’s ability to use the testosterone that is in our bodies,” Dr. Colbert says. “Another is BPA (bisphenol A), found on the inside of metal-canned foods and plastic food-storing containers. Specifically, BPA has been found to cause or contribute to cancer, fertility problems, developmental issues and heart disease. I recommend buying glass jars of food and storing in ceramic containers.”

Diet deficiencies.

“The standard American diet is usually low in key nutrients that support a healthy thyroid,” Dr. Colbert says. “Many patients with hormone imbalances have low iodine. The best solution is eat more vegetables, ideally raw or steamed.”

Aging.

Dr. Colbert says estrogen levels for women begin to decline around the age of 50; for men, testosterone levels can drop low around age 45-50. “Aging is a natural combatant as a hormone disruptor,” he says, “but we can slow the acceleration of the effects of aging by optimizing our hormones. Healthy habits can make a huge difference.”

“Symptoms of serious problems indicated by hormonal imbalance can be reversed by those who focus on health in their diet, lifestyle and living environment,” Dr. Colbert says. “Then they can enable all of their systems to function optimally.”

About Don Colbert, M.D.

Don Colbert, M.D. is the author of Dr. Colbert’s Hormone Health Zone. He has been a board-certified family practice doctor for more than 25 years and has offices in Orlando, Fla., and Dallas. The author of over 40 books, he wrote two New York Times best-sellers – The Seven Pillars of Health and Dr. Colbert’s “I Can Do This” Diet – has sold more than 10 million books and treated 50,000-plus patients. Dr. Colbert is a frequent show guest of Christian leaders Joyce Meyer, John Hagee, and Kenneth Copeland and has been featured on The Dr. Oz Show, Fox News, ABC World News Tonight, and in periodicals such as Newsweek and Reader’s Digest.

CBD is the Alternative

Multiple sclerosis, known as MS, is an unpredictable and often disabling disease that disrupts the flow of information between the brain and body. According to the National MS Society, more than 2.3 million people are affected by MS worldwide.

Celeste Miranda, CEO and founder of CBD Expo Tour and MACE Media Group, was diagnosed at 40 years old with MS and sought out CBD as a natural healing remedy. Celeste is the woman changing how the world views cannabis products and is on a mission to educate the public on the power of CBD. For Celeste, her experience with CBD and struggle with MS is a personal one. She believes that CBD is not a last result but should be the first solution.

Check out our interview below with Celeste talking about all things MS, CBD and the upcoming 2019 CBD Expo Tour.

1. Please tell us about how you were diagnosed with MS.

About eight years ago, I woke up in the morning and could not feel anything from my waist down. I could move and walk normally but when I would scratch my leg, I couldn’t feel myself doing it. I went into the emergency room and about 16 hours later, I was told that I had MS and had three lesions on my brain and two on my spine.

2. What are some of the difficulties and symptoms that you experienced with MS?

The main symptoms that I experience with MS are muscle spasticity, fatigue and brain fog.

3. What medicines or therapies did you use to treat MS before trying CBD?

I was originally prescribed two medications; one almost gave me a rare brain infection and the other wasn’t strong enough so it caused a bunch of relapses. I was also prescribed a multitude of muscle relaxers to help my muscle spasticity.

4. What brought you to seek out CBD as a cure for your MS?

I hated the feeling of being on muscle relaxers and felt like I couldn’t function while on them. I had a client at the time that was a producer of a CBD gum and he offered to send me some to try out. I would take it at the same time that I would normally have taken a muscle relaxer when I was starting to get spasticity in my legs from the MS. I tried the gum and within 10 minutes, my spacitiy went away, completely.

From there, I started researching CBD and this was as new forms started coming out – gummy bears, oils, and things like that. So I got completely off all the muscle relaxers and to this day, I am only on my monthly infusions of Tysabri and CBD.

It took me a lot of research and time to learn the correct dosage for my body. In the morning, I do a smaller dosage and then in the evening, when I know my spasticity usually gets bad, I’ll take a larger dosage. I’ve got it extremely dialed in and those are the only two things I am currently on; the tysabri and CBD. Hopefully, one day we’ll know that it helps enough in lesion prevention that I can get off the Tysabri but for now I am on both and am thrilled because I am no longer on muscle relaxers.

5. What was your doctors reaction to you taking CBD?

The doctors knew from the beginning how I got off the muscle relaxers but they originally did not say much. About three years ago, my doctor at Stanford called me and told me that they had gotten approved for research on MS and CBD and needed my help to get it off the ground. Within two weeks, we were making a bunch of noise and had money coming in to reach the $150,000 goal. At that point, my doctor called me and told me to stop immediately. When I asked why, she told me that Stanford had just lost one of their biggest financial contributors over this and that she had no choice in the manner. To say the least, for the last three years I have been a patient at Cedars-Sinai. I guess in the end, money talks.

6. Tell us about your background and how your experience with MS & CBD ties into your career in the cannabis industry?

Ironically, it all happened at the same time. I had switched my marketing firm from “mainstream” to cannabis shortly after being diagnosed with MS. They were unrelated, but the timing was close.

7. Tell us why you started CBD Expo?

For me, it is personal and the whole purpose of the CBD Expo Tour is education. There are so many questions surrounding CBD and people are very confused about it. Our main goal is to provide education and also to get exposure to some of the products that we think are the best ones out there.

8. What is CBD Expo?

CBD Expo is not like your normal trade show – we focus on both the medical and education sides of our event. We are not a fly by night company, we are here for the long run. We chose our locations for the 2019 Expo strategically because we want to create a surge of knowledge into these communities. So for example, our next conference that is coming up, CBD Expo Midwest in Indianapolis, was chosen because we saw a large amount of sales coming from Indiana from our first show in the West. We took a poll from our exhibitors and it turned out that 70% of their sales were from Indiana. After finding this out, it only made sense to choose this region as our first destination for our 2019 tour.

9. What are the main highlights for the 2019 CBD Expo Tour?

All of our locations are themed and contain panels and carefully selected presentations to create a well-rounded show and meet the needs of each region.
-CBD Expo Midwest (Indianapolis, IN – March 15-16, 2019) focuses on CBD 101: Basic CBD Knowledge and Industry Trends.
-CBD Expo South (San Antonio, TX – June 28-29, 2019).
-CBD Expo Mountain (Denver, CO – October 11-12, 2019) focuses on compliance, regulation, investments and business.
-Cannabinoid + Natural Products (San Diego, CA – December 5-6) focuses on cannabinoid research and cannabinoid formulations.

We are very excited to for CBD Expo Tour 2019 and would like to encourage anyone who is interested in learning more about CBD from experts in the field or launching their own CBD business to join us. More information on the 2019 CBD Expo Tour can be found at https://cbdexpo.net/.

Top Tips to Help Women Treat Carpal Tunnel

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, women are three times more likely to suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome than men, making even the most basic repetitive tasks like typing, using a computer, chopping vegetables and gardening painful. The associated pain or numbness in the hands and wrist that can radiate up the arm and hinder the ability to work is caused by the median or ulnar nerves in the wrist becoming compressed by repetitive motion. The good news is, the pain associated with carpel tunnel can be relieved without surgery. A good fitting wrist brace and a simple exercise, holding the arm out straight and flexing the hand at the wrist, can relieve the pressure on the nerve.

Testing for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

There are two definitive tests that physicians use to diagnose carpal tunnel: Tinel’s and Phalen’s.

 

  • The Tinel’s Test. If tapping on the underside of the wrist causes shooting pains in the hand, it is considered positive.
  • The Phalen’s Test. If the hands feel heavy, tingling, burning, or numb when holding both wrists in a back-to-back position in front of the body, with the wrists bent at 90 degrees for 90 seconds, it is considered positive.

 

Carpal tunnel is sometimes mistaken for thoracic outlet syndrome. The tightness, soreness and restrictions in the neck, shoulder, chest muscles and/or a slight shift in one of the ribs – often attributed to thoracic outlet syndrome – can actually result in symptoms much like carpal tunnel. The good news is that easing the symptoms of both carpal tunnel syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome may be accomplished with a correctly fitting wrist support.

Wrists are not one-size-fits-all. Women’s wrists are, on average, 10 percent narrower than men’s, so it’s important their wrist support is made just for them. The Wellgate for Women Perfect Fit Wrist Support, for example, helps to ease the painful symptoms of carpal tunnel, tendonitis, arthritis and sprains by keeping the wrist in a neutral position to relieve pressure on the median and ulnar nerves during the day and at night.

The American Physical Therapy Association offers these tips for women to limit their chances of getting carpal tunnel syndrome:

  • Consider using a wrist brace at night and when playing sports to support the wrist in a neutral position.
  • Take frequent breaks from activities that require repetitive motion, even cooking tasks.
  • Move only your fingers and keep your wrists straight when typing.
  • When typing, make sure your spine is flush with the chair back, your shoulders are relaxed, and your feet are flat on the floor.
  • Keep your computer monitor at eye level.

 

Women should not just assume they have to live with pain.

 

About the Author

Dr. Holly Herman has been a physical therapist for more than 43 years, with a full-time private practice in Cambridge, MA. Dr. Herman provides expert care for women and men seeking careful, considerate diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic and other medical conditions. She is dedicated to training physical therapy and other healthcare professionals worldwide.

 

Doctor Tries Fasting Trend

Real Doctor Tries the Intermittent Fasting Trend and Here’s What Happened https://tourocom.touro.edu/academics/faculty/harlem/niket-sonpal.php

There’s crash dieting, and then there’s intermittent fasting. Crash diets aren’t sustainable and rarely factor in healthy food options. Intermittent fasting on the other hand is gaining attention because people are seeing weight come off, and therefore stay with it. It’s being touted as the go-to way to lose 15, 20 pounds within a month or two. Is it just a popular hashtag or can the weight actually stay off leading millions of people to reach their weight goals? To get clarity, we spoke to Dr. Niket Sonpal who not only is Board Certified in Internal Medicine specializing in Gastroenterology; but lost 8 pounds his first week of intermittent fasting when he decided to do it himself. Here’s what he has to say about intermittent fasting.

What inspired your decision to do intermittent fasting?

I noticed the winter weight became the spring then summer weight and I wanted to take off extra pounds that I noticed had crept on. I was with friends talking about how they lost weight during Ramadan (would prefer religious observations) and that intermittent fasting was a “thing.” I rolled my eyes. I was skeptical. Then I went online and applied my doctor mind to the concepts I was reading about it and went for it.

There are several ways to go about intermittent fasting. Which way did you do it, when did you start and what was the result?

This is true. The way I chose, and the way I would imagine most people would try, is the one that calls for 16 hours of fasting with 8 hours of eating time per day. This basically means if your last meal of the day is 8pm you will have your first meal by noon the following day, free to eat until 8pm again. I figured since I sleep most of those hours, it wouldn’t be as tough as another option where you fast for 5 days and eat for 2 with a 500-800 calorie intake limit on those 2 days.

What were the challenges (if any) that you faced when intermittent fasting?

I live across the street from a bagel shop in New York City. I also have delicious New York pizza on every other corner. Cravings and temptation were there for me for sure. When I left my home and smelled those fresh bagels my brain said. “let’s eat.”

Coming at your intermittent fasting as a doctor, what were some things you were thinking about that others must consider too?

I thought when I would fast. When would be my 8-hour eating period. When we start caloric consumption right when we wake up we do better with weight loss. However, that would mean eating from 7 am until 4pm. This would require a later meal around 3pm. Then I thought, does my lifestyle better allow a 12 noon to 8pm food window?

I also thought about the physiological aspect to what happens to our bodies when we fast intermittently. For one thing, it facilitates weight loss by enhancing hormone function. Insulin levels also lower, plus there’s a rise in noradrenaline. This combination is what helps us to breakdown body fat for energy. While this all reads well on paper there is a lifestyle aspect to it that must be factored in. I’ll add that anyone with a condition should consult with their doctor before going all in on intermittent fasting.

Why do you think it is so difficult for people to fast? What are some of the common symptoms people feel when fasting and what causes them?

When people think of fasting they think of starvation and deprivation. They anticipate they will feel terrible will have a growling stomach, dull headaches, and a bad mood. While these are common symptoms felt at first when fasting, the 16/8 intermittent fasting option allows for food every day. When people see quick results, they stick with it.

What was your diet? What did you cut out and add in?

I looked at my schedule and my overall daily lifestyle and how food was involved. For people who live very hurried lifestyles, food is typically something that is grabbed fast on the go. When we approach food this way no diet will be sustainable. I realized this would require consistent changes in my behavior. It would also require me to get very mindful about what I was eating during the 8 hours of eating time. I chose to eat what I liked in moderation. So, if two slices of pizza twice per week was the lunchtime norm, I reduced to it to once slice. I still ate pasta just not as often and not as much. I also added in a lot more vegetables, proteins, healthy fats and cut out all fast food and soda. Hey, I’m a doctor, but also a human!

For those thinking about intermittent fasting, how would you advise them to proceed?

I would explain that at around the 2 to 4-week mark, someone may plateau. When you notice this don’t think this is the most weight you are able to lose. This is normal and if you are also exercising with weight or resistance training you may be building muscle mass. Pay attention to how clothes fit, body fat loss and how weight loss shows beyond the scale. Knowing how over time the body gets used to intermittent fasting and starts to store up all that is eaten, leading to less weight loss, I suggest resetting your body by eating small, healthy meals throughout the day for a week and then resuming the 16/8 intermittent fasting option again.

People may happily think that they can fast and then enjoy a big bowl of pasta or cheeseburger. What kinds of foods should people eat during intermittent fasting?

You can get results without cutting out your favorite foods which means enjoy that burger or pasta, I did! However, you can’t binge on fast food and think you’re going to make any lasting changes. You want to up your vegetable intake. Things like grilled zucchini or eggplant make for great sides to a piece of grilled chicken or steak. Avocados are a good staple for healthy fats and are versatile. There are loads of recipes out there so plan out your food options in advance, so you stick with it.

About the doctor:

Dr. Niket Sonpal is Assistant Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, Clinical instructor at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn and on the board of the NY‐American College of Physicians (NYACP). He is also the associate program director for the Internal Medicine residency program at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center. He is trained in Internal medicine, Gastroenterology and has a focus on Men’s and Women’s health.

DIGEST THIS NOW! FOR KIDS! × HEALTHY FACTS

HEALTHY FACTS FOR KIDS (& PARENTS)

12-Year-Old Nutrition Expert Shares Kids Can Be Active & Healthy

by Kai Nunziato-Cruz

Hey Guys! Kai here from Generation Kai! As a 12 year old I’m just like you, getting ready to go back to school to see my friends again. Oh yeah, and I’m going into the 7th grade! You probably don’t know who I am, and I don’t know who you are so we’re even.

360 Magazine, Kai Nunziato-Cruz

Last year I published a book called, “Digest This Now for Kids!” it’s a quick and easy read about how your body works and what you need to do to get and stay healthy. I talk about everything from food to stress (we’re not supposed to be stressed as kids but some of us are). You’d think we as kids don’t need to learn how to get and stay healthy, we’re kids, we’re supposed to be healthy. So many of us are tired, overweight, on lots of medicines already for whatever health issues we are having. I don’t know about you, but I believe at our age, this shouldn’t be happening! I get asked to write articles for magazines and online blogs all the time to give kids (and even adults) tips on how to be healthier. So, if you’re ready to get healthy and stay healthy this article is for you!

I saw an unbelievable statistic recently at a recent visit to my doctor’s office for my check-up. I thought it would make for a great article.

AMAZING STATISTIC: For every 2 hours you spend on the couch, you increase your chances of obesity by 25%.

As Buddy the Elf would say, “that’s shocking”. I mean, that’s a pretty high percentage. And most people these days are spending 4 – 5 hours on the couch every night so does that mean they are increasing their chances by 50%?

They say the reason is because when you are sitting for long periods of time you obviously aren’t moving your body, so being stagnant doesn’t help. The only thing that moves the lymph is us moving the body. If the body doesn’t move, the lymph doesn’t move. When the lymph gets backed up the toxic build-up begins which includes weight gain.

On top of this many people eat mindlessly while they watch TV – grabbing a bag of their favorite treat and eating away without even realizing how much they’re eating. Eating while watching TV is one of the most dangerous things you can do to your body. When your brain is watching TV you completely lose the mind body connection between your brain and your stomach. Your stomach can’t communicate that you are full so you keep eating.

I know many people watch hours of TV at night as a way to relax. But I’d like to challenge you to find new ways to relax. It doesn’t have to cost money to get up and do things; a walk around the block for example, trying out a new sport like tennis or racquetball, riding your bicycle around the neighborhood, go to your local park, play hide and seek around the house or play a board game, plant a garden, visit a friend, volunteer at a local hospital, take up a new hobby, etc. Honestly anything else you do aside from sit and watch TV every single night of the week is going to be better for your health – both physical health and mental health. To watch a couple of my YouTube videos on some of the things I like to do instead of watching TV click here and here, don’t forget to like and subscribe while you’re there.

I just want to challenge you to start with one night a week of doing something different. I think you will find it very refreshing and you might want to do it more and more as the weeks go on.

360 Magazine, Kai Nunziato-Cruz

ABOUT KAI NUNZIATO-CRUZ:

Kai Nunziato-Cruz is a 12-year-old nutrition expert from Arizona. As the son of Liz Cruz M.D., a board-certified Gastroenterologist, and Tina Nunziato, a Certified Holistic Nutrition Consultant, Kai has watched his Moms for years help adults get well and stay well with their books, podcast, online home study program and more and felt it was his mission to take those same teachings to kids.

For More Information Visit:

http://generationkai.com/for-kids/

Why Some Women are Delaying Pregnancy

New findings from a recent survey show that women living with chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disease feel they don’t have enough information to make informed decisions about how to balance pregnancy with disease management. Some women feel they have no choice but to stop treatment or delay their plans for pregnancy. These women are living with a variety of autoimmune conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn’s disease.

Now, a new initiative called the AIM (Autoimmune Motherhood) Movement is being launched to rally these women and provide support, information and a place for them to share stories about motherhood with chronic inflammatory disease. The education campaign and online community aims to help women learn the facts about their conditions and appropriate disease management options, while allowing them to share experiences to empower one another.

AIM Survey Shows:

  • Almost half (44%) of U.S. women surveyed had concerns serious enough that they delayed their plans to become pregnant
  • 61% believed they could not combine treatment and breastfeeding
  • Only 41% consulted a healthcare professional before becoming pregnant, suggesting the need for women to become more engaged in treatment and pregnancy planning earlier

On Wednesday, July 11th, join Dr. Grace Wright, rheumatologist at New York University Langone Medical Center and patient Rosanna, who shares her compelling story of living 30 years with rheumatoid arthritis and the physical and emotional challenges she endures while dealing with her disease. Both guests will help bring awareness to the issues surrounding ways to manage chronic inflammatory disease throughout the family planning journey. They’ll also reveal the results of the AIM Patient Survey to help others in similar situations make the best decisions for themselves and their families.

Kate Spade

55 year old American fashion designer Kate Spade passed away on Tuesday from an apparent suicide by hanging after she was found in her Manhattan apartment. At 10:10am, Kate’s housekeeper contacted the police. A suicide note was also found on site, naming both her daughter and husband in the letter. She had been suffering from anxiety and depression for many years and had been regularly visiting her doctor for treatment and medications.

She revolutionized the fashion industry with her iconic stylish handbag designs after she founded Kate Spade New York in 1993. Kate Spade was an absolutely must have item in the 1990’s and her brand quickly became popular as a result of the style, functionality, and sophistication of her elegantly designed bags. She will be greatly missed, but her legacy will live on for years to come.

Winter Season × Headaches

Many can agree that the winter season can be a headache – from shoveling snow, bearing the freezing temperatures, de-icing the car – the list goes on. However, what many don’t realize is that the chilly weather can be physically giving you a headache (all thanks to changes in barometric pressure).

With migraines being the 3rd most prevalent illness in the world, it’s important that people understand their triggers and know that weather is one of the top causes of migraines.

Dr. Susan Hutchinson is a practicing migraine physician and medical advisor at MigraineX, who can discuss:

• ‘Tis the Season for Migraines – Are ‘Winter Headaches’ Really a Thing?

• How to Know If Weather Might Be Your Migraine Trigger

• Solutions for Weather-Related Migraines

• More

About Dr. Susan Hutchinson

Dr. Susan Hutchinson is a headache specialist and board-certified family practice physician. In February 2007, she founded Orange County Migraine & Headache Center, dedicated to serving patients with headache and mood disorders.

Prior to starting Orange County Migraine & Headache Center, Dr. Hutchinson practiced as a family practice physician in the Irvine Area since 1985. Over the years, she developed a passion for helping patients with headache, especially migraine. Dr. Hutchinson suffers from migraine headaches which gives her an empathy with her patients. She felt such a calling to help patients with headache and mood disorders that she decided to specialize and devote her career to alleviating the suffering caused by both headaches and mood disorders..

She lectures nationally on the subject of headache; has written dozens of articles for medical journals; participated in headache research projects and is very active in numerous professional organizations such as the American Headache Society and the National Headache Foundation. She is the immediate post-chair of the Women’s Issues section of the American Headache Society after serving in the chair position for 5 years. Dr. Hutchinson is a dynamic and sought-after speaker.

POLISHED FOR MEN

By Andrew Carey Irving

Step 1: Daily Micro-Scrub

Exfoliants I’ve used in the past have either been like sandpaper, or the opposite, where I can barely feel any results. This is just right. It doesn’t feel too rough, but you can tell it’s getting rid of that dead layer of skin. Smells good too!


Step 02: Dual Cleanse & Shave

I’m a minimalist, so I love anything that does double duty like this. It’s a thicker cream, so it takes getting used to when using it as a cleanser. But it’s great to be able to wash your face and then shave at the same time!


Step 03: Oil Free Moisturizer

This is also pretty thick, and you can see the coverage before it blends into the skin, which is great to know your whole face is protected. After it absorbed into my skin, my face felt soft and seemed to be glowing. In fact, after I did this video, someone came to the door, and they commented how refreshed I looked!

PolishedByDrLancer.com

https://the360mag.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/POLISHED_ANDREW.mov