Posts tagged with "dietitian"

Caroline Hodge, 360 MAGAZINE, cannabis, unions

PLANT-BASED EATING × DIETS

Plant-based eating not only provides health benefits, it’s good for the environment too. Having a diet rich in plant-based sources is becoming increasingly common, especially with younger generations driving the conversation around sustainability.

Relying on plant-based foods as a primary food source can have a massive effect, and if we all choose plant-based options even a few times a week, we can change the world. The greatest journey starts with the smallest step.

Showcasing the surge in plant-based eating, all products from Huel, the fastest growing nutrition company in the world, with a variety of powders and Ready-to-drink beverages, are plant-based.

Co-Founder and Head of Nutrition at Huel, James Collier answers some common questions about plant-based eating.

What is a plant-based diet?

A plant-based diet is a diet that consists mainly of foods from plants. Such foods include fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes and whole grains. Meat intake is minimal if any.

There are many reasons why people eat a plant-based diet including environmental, ethical and health concerns. I am not suggesting to eliminate meat from a person’s diet completely, however, reducing meat and animal food consumption is one of the quickest and simple ways an individual can reduce their carbon footprint.

What foods should we eat to achieve daily recommended nutrients, vitamins, minerals on a plant-based diet?

There are some easy ways to ensure, with a plant-based diet, you can get the recommended amounts of all nutrients:

– Eat the rainbow.

As different color foods usually contain different levels of nutrients, it’s important to eat a variety. For example, the phytonutrient, lycopene which is an antioxidant that protects against cell damage and gives tomatoes its red color. While carotenoids, another group of antioxidants, give fruits and vegetables orange and yellow colors, such as carrots.

– Get enough Vitamin B12.

Vitamin B12, which plays a vital role in helping the body produce red blood cells can usually be perceived as tricky to get enough of with a plant-based diet. The good news is, it’s really not. As a start, try incorporating plant-based milks that are that are fortified with B12, and calcium and vitamin D. Cereals, meat alternatives and some soy products are often fortified with B12 too. Taking a B12 supplement also rids any concerns.

– Ensure adequate omega-3 consumption.

If oily fish is not part of your eating plan, then foods such as walnuts, soy and flaxseed are ways to ensure adequate omega 3 consumption.

Flaxseed is one of Huel’s six main ingredients and contains the omega-3 essential fatty acid ALA. Omega-3 fats are generally low in a Western diet and adequate omega-3 consumption is important to support cardiovascular health.

– Keep your iron up

Iron is not just found in meat food sources. Dark leafy greens, nuts and dried fruits are great sources of iron. Iron is crucial for oxygen transport, cognitive function and the immune system. Iron from plant sources can be harder to absorb, but again, there’s no need to worry. Iron absorption can also be increased by the presence of vitamin C which is found in lots of fruits and vegetables such as oranges and peppers. It’s where the idea of having orange juice with breakfast comes from – to increase the iron that is added to cereals.

Huel contains 280% of the nutrient reference value using only plant sources. Although this looks high, it’s to account for the bioavailability of iron and it’s interaction with other nutrients, which can also affect its absorption.

How can someone transition to plant-based eating?

Whether your motivation to increase plant-based foods to your eating plan is to improve your health or environmental footprint, incorporating higher amounts of plant-based foods can be achievable.

– Make small changes over time.

Start by eating one plant-based meal a day. This will be easier to stick with rather than making large, unsustainable changes overnight. If preparing a nutritious meal in the middle of the day is not easily achievable, and your nearby lunchtime corner shop leaves you limited with health plant-based or vegan options, then Huel is a good convenient and nutritious meal option. It’s a nutritionally complete meal providing all 27 essential vitamins and minerals with an ideal macronutrient split, with good quality carbohydrates, fats and protein.

– Make some easy fridge swaps.

A good place to start is by swapping dairy milk with almond or oat milk such as Oatly. The rapidly growing plant-based meat industry lead by Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods is also providing shoppers with plenty of options.

– Change your mindset.

Instead of thinking, “I can’t eat meat,” think about all the wonderful things you can eat and how beneficial these are for your health (and the planet). Stop focussing on meat as the hero on your plate and rather, build your plate with new and nutritious food choices.

Huel was co-founded by James Collier, Registered Nutritionist with 20 years experience with the national health service in the UK. James is a renowned nutrition expert with over 25 years working in nutrition and dietetics. His experience also includes working in the NHS (UK) as a clinical dietitian covering an array of clinical areas.

Huel’s mission is to make nutritionally complete, convenient, affordable food, with minimum impact on animals and the environment. With this in mind, Huel’s products are 100% vegan. Along with the seven variations of the Huel powder (including a gluten-free option), Huel has launched a number of nutritionally complete products, including a convenient Ready-to-drink format, the world’s first nutritionally complete granola and an on-the-go bar which makes for the perfect snack.


HUEL BACKGROUND INFO:

Huel recently announced that the brand has sold over 50 million meals since its launch in 2015. Huel is available in over 80 countries and is seeing a surge in popularity around the globe. Huel also announced that the company expects its valuation to top $1.25B within three years, demonstrating the booming interest in the company’s line of complete nutrition offerings.

Key features of Huel include:

– It’s Easy: Huel is a perfectly balanced and nutritionally complete meal that you can prepare in under one minute

– Nutritionally Complete: Huel Powder is a nutritionally complete food that is high in protein and fiber, low in sugar and salt, rich in phytonutrients and contains all 27 essential vitamins and minerals

– Plant-based and Lactose/Soy/GMO-Free: It contains no lactose or any animal products, no soy and no GMO

– Affordable: Huel starts at just $2.35 for a 400-calorie nutritionally complete meal and bulk and subscription discounts can be enjoyed by anyone for as low as $1.95 per meal

– Huel is Food: Huel is far superior nutrition to most conventional diets. Huel can replace any meal or even as a between-meal snack. In this way it can be an add-on improvement to your diet to ensure you’re giving your body what it needs.

– Zero food waste: Because you only use the Huel that you need to consume, and because Huel powder has a 1-year shelf life, Huel produces zero food waste

– High manufacturing standards: Huel’s facilities and equipment are held to the highest safety standards and regulations

– Vegan/environmentally friendly: Being vegan and producing zero food waste means Huel has much less of an environmental impact on the planet than many other food products

How to Reduce Belly Fat

Top 5 tips by Registered Dietitian Ilana Muhlstein on how people can reduce belly fat for bathing suit season

  1. What are foods to eat to reduce belly fat?

Water filled veggies are great for helping you lose weight, and stay regular so you can relieve bloat. Some great examples are tomatoes, cucumbers and zucchinis that are rich in potassium, which can also help release water retention you may be carrying in your stomach.

  1. What are some foods to avoid?

Research has shown that cortisol, our stress hormone, can cause abdominal weight gain. Meaning that if you are stress eating, you will likely not just gain weight, but gain it in your lower stomach. Therefore, it is a good idea to ab-void stress eating in general and find better coping strategies for dealing with stress. Examples are calling a friend, taking a walk or long shower, doing yoga or another workout, meditating and/or journaling.
And the foods we reach for when stressed are typically higher in fat, refined carbohydrates, and sugar, which can be addictive and lead to excess weight gain. Therefore, it is a good idea to keep these trigger foods out of sight and out of mind, and not buy and bring them home, especially during stressful times.

  1. How to keep belly fat off for good?

Clear the counter tops of sliced bread, jars of cookies, bowls of candies, and boxes of cereal. And replace it with great things that can be helpful immediately if feeling hungry like a water cooler, boxes of cherry tomatoes (my daughter reaches into these daily for a quick snack), and a bowl of apples. You should also have things out that keep you thinking about your healthy lifestyle. Some examples are a tea or coffee station; some veggies that need cooking like spaghetti squash, turnips, and onions; and a Shakeology or smoothie station (if there is still room).

  1. What are your favorite core-flattening recipes?

I like to make a chocolate Shakeology shake with half a cup of water, half a cup of coconut water, ice, and a scoop each of the Shakeology Power Greens and Digestive Health Boosts. This recipe tastes like delicious chocolate ice cream, but is only 250 calories. It also has 20g of protein which helps stave off hunger and cravings, and 13g of fiber which helps keep you regular, (because constipation is definitely not “core flattering”).

  1. How do you limit sugar intake?

I always keep a little “mommy drawer” that contains mint gum in the kitchen. I find that if someone is craving chocolate, brushing his teeth with mint toothpaste could crush that craving. And chewing gum makes it really hard to also chew a mouthful of pasta or teriyaki beef stir fry.
Also the PB& J sandwich swapped for a PB&J Wonder Whip. In a bowl, add plain Greek yogurt, powdered peanut butter, and honey or stevia to taste. Whip it up very well, and top with sliced grapes or strawberries.

For additional professional opinions on this topic, we highly recommend visiting Dr. Michael Ruscio’s blog (and also downloading his latest book, Healthy Gut, Healthy You).

360, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery, Ilana Muhlstein

Emotional Eating Contributing to Your Prediabetes?

Here Are Eight ADA-Approved Techniques to Break This Dangerous Habit

If you’ve got prediabetes, it’s time to adopt healthier eating habits. But emotional eating is one habit that could derail your progress and put you further at risk. Jill Weisenberger, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide, offers tips to help you stop emotional eating today.

Arlington, VA (May 2018)—If you’ve been diagnosed with prediabetes or have been told that you’re at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, you already know you’ve got to change your eating habits. But overhauling your diet is anything but easy—especially when you’re feeling hurt, sad, mad, lonely, or aggravated. If you turn to food when you’re stressed or unhappy, you could be damaging your health with emotional eating.

“Plenty of people who try to adopt healthier eating habits often find themselves waylaid by emotional eating,” says Jill Weisenberger, who partnered with the American Diabetes Association to write Prediabetes: A Complete Guide: Your Lifestyle Reset to Stop Prediabetes and Other Chronic Illnesses (American Diabetes Association, May 2018, ISBN: 978-1-580-40674-1, $16.95). “Digging into a carton of ice cream or bag of chips when you’re feeling down can quickly derail your health goals. And for the 84 million American adults with prediabetes, emotional eating can be especially dangerous to your health.”

Weisenberger says it can be hard to break the habit of emotional eating, because psychology and biology are both at play. People reach for “feel-good” foods like Mom’s cookies or a cheesy casserole. Additionally, stress hormones crank up the appetite, and eating releases the brain’s feel-good chemicals. Often, a psychotherapist skilled in working with people with disordered eating is the ideal person to help you. Ask your healthcare provider for a referral if you think a psychotherapist can help you.

Despite these challenges, you can learn to stop emotional eating with practice and diligence. Are you ready to break free of emotional eating and move one step closer to reclaiming your health? Here are a few techniques that may help you on your journey.

Keep a log. Record your food intake for a week or two. Track what you’re eating along with your mood. This process may help you find choice points in which you can learn to change your thinking and behavior and teach you to identify your breaking points long before you break.

“Consider keeping a photo log,” suggests Weisenberger. “If you’re about to eat, snap a picture. Do this for a week to see in color the choices you’ve been making.”

Notice and label your emotions. Having negative emotions isn’t usually bad. In fact, having negative emotions is actually normal. But taking a deep dive into a bag of salty, crunchy snacks because of negative emotions is unhelpful in the long run.

“Practice noticing and labeling your emotions,” says Weisenberger. “Are you sad, anxious, lonely, or mad? Naming them and observing them without judgment will help you learn about them. Many people find that journaling about their emotions is helpful.”

Imagine handling emotional situations. In your mind, practice responding to common triggers in ways that don’t lead you to overeating. Think about what you can do next time you feel overwhelmed with household chores or the next time you argue with your spouse or whatever situation leads you to eat emotionally. Over and over in your mind, practice acting in desirable ways. “Here again,” says Weisenberger, “many people find journaling enlightening and empowering.”

Create a plan. After imagining responding in positive ways, create a plan for difficult situations. If you need distractions, gather things to help you, such as puzzle books, adult coloring books, nail polish, a list of people to call, or a list of activities such as soaking in a bath or playing with your dog.

“If you know that exercise or meditation help you cope with strong emotions, plan to take at least five minutes for meditation or exercise,” says Weisenberger. “You may need more than one plan to address various situations.”

Practice non-food coping skills. Regularly soothe yourself without calories. Every day, take time for soothing enjoyment, so when the time comes, you have an arsenal of coping strategies at the ready. Some ideas include taking deep-breathing breaks, using adult coloring books, writing in a journal, listening to soothing or uplifting music, chatting with a friend, buying yourself flowers, or soaking in a hot tub.

“I regularly play with my dog, Benny, a perpetual puppy,” says Weisenberger. “I also call and text my daughters, spend quiet time drinking tea or coffee with my husband, take five-minute breaks outside, and sit alone sipping a warm and fragrant tea from a beautiful cup. How you choose to soothe yourself is as individual as you are.”

Adopt a morning ritual. A morning ritual potentially has the power to affect your entire day. A ritual is different from a routine in that a ritual holds a deeper meaning. A few examples are:

• Express gratitude in thoughts, a journal, or aloud.

• Reaffirm your goals in writing or aloud.

• Practice yoga, meditation, or prayer.

• Watch a sunrise.

• Visualize good things happening in your day.

• Recite affirmations or a mantra.

Build in food treats. Whatever food you reach for in times of stress probably has some special meaning to you. Is it chocolate, macaroni and cheese, pizza, or hot-from-the-oven cookies? Whatever it is, be sure to have some now and then. Not as a reward, but simply because you like the way it tastes. Practice enjoying this favorite food in a reasonable amount, perhaps as part of a balanced meal. Simply removing a food’s taboo label can be helpful. In this way, you are learning that it’s okay to treat yourself and removing the notion of treats as cheats. We all deserve treats, but cheat days are the wrong mindset.

Create a personal wellness vision and review it often. A personal wellness vision is a concrete and motivating picture of you being healthy, feeling healthy, and living a healthful life. Imagine yourself at your ideal level of well-being. How do you feel? Look? Act? Write down what this looks like for you. This vision will help you identify what is important to you.

“After creating your vision, be sure to regularly look it over! It’s easy to forget what really matters when you’re under stress or running in crisis mode. But knowing—and remembering—what’s really important steers you to appropriate actions.”

“Reaching for food to manage your emotions can be a very hard habit to break,” concludes Weisenberger. “Become aware of times when you look to food to soothe you, calm you down, or help you avoid your feelings. When you recognize that you’ve been eating with your emotions, you can change the behavior and continue striving toward your health goals.”

You can visit Jill Weisenberger’s website here