Posts tagged with "designer"

Trump-Putin Meeting

When Trump-Putin meeting takes place in Helsinki, the floating swimming arena in the city centre will become a familiar scene around the world. Some international medias will keep Helsinki Allas Seapool as their base.

See how the Finnish pontoon company Marinetek made this unique structure float with integrated heated fresh and sea water pools for year-around use. And all this just in front of the presidential palace of Finland. Could you imagine a public swimming arena less than 100 metres from the White House or Kremlin?

Video showing how the floating platform was built: https://youtu.be/J084mjaddaA

Technical data and details:
http://marinetek.net/blog/articles/the-allas-sea-pool-showcases-marineteks-diverse-planning-and-construction-know-how/
http://marinetek.net/blog/references/allas-sea-pool-helsinki-finland/

The urban seawater pool is a great example of Finnish engineering and advanced floating technology delivered by Marinetek.

Marinetek is a leading designer and turnkey builder of yacht marinas and floating structures that is well known for its large concrete pontoons and ability to undertake wide-ranging projects worldwide. The company has an impressive track record with over 2,000 reference projects in four continents.

Learn more about the essence Marinetek structural concrete pontoon technology and its benefits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwcOhJpPRUo

Paris FW x Haute Couture

During Paris Fashion Week Haute Couture, on Tuesday, July 3,

Maison des Centraliens has hosted three young designers with their Fall- Winter Collections 2018-2019:

 

ABE by Ariane Chaumeil Jewelry  “Miroir”

There is magic and mystery in a mirror : the reflexion of who looks into it is real, but reversed.  Since we gaze at ourselves, all fantasies become possible and brings us back to face each other, and to what the world has to face. As a two-way mirror, you can see without being seen. Step through and find out with this collection, and the part of your soul using your imagination, whether it is dark or whether radiant…

The fall winter collection of the ABE by Ariane Chaumeil house, whose crafting remains done with the blowtorch glass, becomes richer with a new proposition: the metal paste making. Sculpted and cast, the metal paste is modelled, sanded, fired at high temperature, brushed and rubbed with a burnisher and polished several times in order to get pieces of golden and white bronze, and of pure copper, with a shiny, ancient rendering.

 

A couture collection by  designer Armine Ohanyan

A couture collection made in France, entirely handmade, intimately inspired by nature, showing the natural elements in all their forms. Ice, crystallization, rain, wind, dew and roots. Crystallized in these surroundings, the Human Being becomes Nature. The Nature is everlasting, nothing can stop it. It is the true beauty, perfection. For depicting this cycle of evolution, Armine Ohanyan uses the new technologies such as 3D printing or materials crafting, which play an important role in her creation process. Her art investigations never end, like the movement that she shows in its different forms and their ranges of colours and materials. Her creations are futuristic, modern, with a wide beauty touch.

 

Baroqco Jewelry

Designers Imelda and Eduardo aka Baroqco are citizens of the world . Their roots are from Dutch Chinese Indonesian and Portuguese descent, and this diversity is what provides foundation that leads to the inspiration and creation. BaroQco comes from Baroque, an era of change from simplicity to lively and exuberant detail. BaroQco stands alone with its unique grandeur and ability to surprise and to achieve a sense of awe. Imelda and Eduardo started to create jewelry as they were looking for a tiara or crown for their wedding day. At that time there were not a lot of options, so they decided to create their own tiara which lead others to ask whether they could also make necklaces and earrings.

« As we embrace the impressionism, we strive not only for the outer but especially for the inner-beauty. In our creations we want to push boundaries of artistic techniques. And therefore the BaroQco is a book without an End. »

The materials are opal ,gold and Swarovski and all the metalwork are nickel free, the usage of non toxic and – hazardous for plating makes the jewelry more ecofriendly.

 

 

See pictures below :

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The Untitled Space × Defining Form

DEFINING FORM
A Group Show of Sculpture Curated by Indira Cesarine

RECEPTION: July 11, 2018
VIP + PRESS PREVIEW (by invitation) 4pm – 6pm //
OPENING RECEPTION 6pm – 9pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
July 11, 2018 – August 1, 2018

THE UNTITLED SPACE

45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W New York, NY 10013

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “DEFINING FORM,” a group exhibition of contemporary artists exploring 2 and 3-dimensional sculpture opening on July 11, 2018 and on view through August 1st, 2018. Curated by Indira Cesarine, “DEFINING FORM” takes a comprehensive look at the manifestations of contemporary sculpture today, engaging a dialogue of the narratives resonating amongst sculptors through works in mediums such as metal, stone, clay, wood, glass, textiles, recycled and repurposed materials, as well as mixed media.

DEFINING FORM presents figurative and abstract works by over 50 emerging and established artists. The group show investigates progressive themes in sculpture, including contemporary feminism, gender identity and political art, as well as new technologies in digital sculpture, with an emphasis on originality and innovative usage of materials. Technological advances in fabrication and digital sculpture have had a massive impact on the art form over the past few decades. Classic techniques such as chiseling stone and casting in bronze have shifted towards new technologies such as 3-D printing, materials such as silicone, plastics, and textiles as well as found, recycled and re-purposed materials. The domination of large-scale works has given way to delicate and intimate pieces as well as a wave of sculptural installations that deconstruct notions of space and form. Artists are pushing the boundaries of the art form integrating components of sound, video, light and performance as well as painting, photography and other mediums.

As the art form evolves in new directions with the impact of contemporary culture, it has transcended from the conventional portrait to works that challenge the status quo, address gender identity and racial stereotypes, LGBTQ ideologies and queer constructs, explore themes of the resistance movement as well as progressive feminist narratives and activism. Exhibit DEFINING FORM presents the new narrative of sculpture with works that interrogate ideologies of the art form, pushing forward experimental works that engage all of our senses and ignite fresh dialogues.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS

Alexandra Rubinstein, Andres Bardales, Ann Lewis, Arlene Rush, Barb Smith, Christina Massey, Colin Radcliffe, Cristin Millett, Daria Zhest, Desire Rebecca Moheb, Dévi Loftus, Elektra KB, Elizabeth Riley, Emily Elliott, Gracelee Lawrence, Hazy Mae, Indira Cesarine, Jackie Branson, Jamia Weir, Jasmine Murell, Jen Dwyer, Jennifer Garcia, Jess DeWahls, Jocelyn Braxton Armstrong, Jonathan Rosen, Kacy Jung, Kate Hush, Kelsey Bennett, Laura Murray, Leah Gonzales, Lola Ogbara, Maia Radanovic, Manju Shandler, Meegan Barnes, Michael Wolf, Nicole Nadeau, Olga Rudenko, Rachel Marks, Rebecca Goyette, Ron Geibel, Ronald Gonzalez, Roxi Marsen, Sandra Erbacher, Sarah Maple, Seunghwui Koo, Shamona Stokes, Sophia Wallace, Stephanie Hanes, Storm Ascher, Suzanne Wright, Tatyana Murray, Touba Alipour, Whitney Vangrin, Zac Hacmon

CURATORIAL STATEMENT

“What is sculpture today? I invited artists of all genders and generations to present their most innovative 2 and 3-dimensional sculptures for consideration for DEFINING FORM. After reviewing more than 600 artworks, I selected sculptures by over 50 artists that reflect new tendencies in the art form. DEFINING FORM artists defy stereotypes with inventive works that tackle contemporary culture. Traditionally highly male dominated, I was inspired by the new wave of female sculptors making their mark with works engaging feminist narratives. The artworks in DEFINING FORM explode with new ideas, vibrant colors, and display a thoroughly modern sensibility through fearless explorations of the artists and unique usage of innovative materials ranging from fabric, plastic, and foam to re-purposed and found objects including chewing gum, trash and dirt. Recycled materials are celebrated along with works engaging new digital technologies. The exhibit displays works that are politically charged, contrasted with those full of satire and humor. In the investigation of new tendencies, I felt it was important to juxtapose figurative works with the abstract, new materials with the classics, creating an immersive exhibit that defines new trends in sculpture and contemporary constructs of the art form.” – Indira Cesarine

Official Exhibit Website: http://untitled-space.com/defining-form-a-group-show-of-sculpture

The Untitled Space

www.untitled-space.com

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Stay Dangerous Live Concert & 4Hunnid Fashion Show

YG PRESENTS STAY DANGEROUS LIVE CONCERT & 4HUNNID FASHION SHOW!
SUNDAY, AUGUST 5TH
THE MICROSOFT THEATRE

PRE-SALE TICKETS BEGIN FRIDAY, JUNE 22 AT 10 AM PST
https://www.axs.com/events/355379/yg-presents-stay-dangerous-tickets

W Hotels of NY

On Tuesday, June 19th:
From 10pm-2am, W Hotels of NY will host No Shade at W New York – Times Square, a ball to celebrate voguing culture. Attendees will be invited to partake.
Ballroom categories include (for those wishing to compete):

– Old Way vs. New Way – In a tracksuit.
– Runway – All American vs. European.
– Foot & Eye – In a colorful combo. Designer not required, just be FIERCE.
– Face – Pride Queen/King with all five rainbow colors on your face.
Music by MikeQ. $1500 in cash prizes and two night weekend stays at the W Hotels of New York will be at stake. Open to the public with tickets for $15.

On Thursday, June 21st:
From 6:00-8:30pm, W NY – Union Square will host What She Said: Gender Identity, an open-format panel discussion. What She Said: Gender Identity will open the floor to a panel of activists, business owners, models and actresses to share their personal journeys with gender identity, fluidity, and sexuality. Free and open to the public.
The panelists will be:

Elliott Sailors, androgynous model, award-winning actor and LGBTQIA activist.

Rob Smith, founder of Phluid Project, the world’s first genderless retail space
Jess Miller, queer activist and model
Anita Dolce Vita, Editor-in-Chief of dapperQ, a leading online queer style magazine
Serving as the moderator is Jane Mulkerrins, a journalist whose work covers the topics of sexuality, gender, politics, and race; and where it intersects with Hollywood. The event is part of W Hotel’s What She Said global speaker series focused on empowering women. Link: http://www.whotelsnewyork.com/events/what-she-said-gender-identity/

Kate Spade

55 year old American fashion designer Kate Spade passed away on Tuesday from an apparent suicide by hanging after she was found in her Manhattan apartment. At 10:10am, Kate’s housekeeper contacted the police. A suicide note was also found on site, naming both her daughter and husband in the letter. She had been suffering from anxiety and depression for many years and had been regularly visiting her doctor for treatment and medications.

She revolutionized the fashion industry with her iconic stylish handbag designs after she founded Kate Spade New York in 1993. Kate Spade was an absolutely must have item in the 1990’s and her brand quickly became popular as a result of the style, functionality, and sophistication of her elegantly designed bags. She will be greatly missed, but her legacy will live on for years to come.

New Audi Q8

  • Expressive design with new Singleframe and features from the original Audi quattro
  • Generous, elegant interior, touch operating concept and high-tech navigation
  • All-wheel steering and quattro drive for agile handling and best traction

Ingolstadt/Shenzhen, June 5, 2018 – The Audi Q8 combines the elegance of a four-door luxury coupé with the practical versatility of a large SUV. Richly equipped, comprehensively connected and tough enough for off-road duty, it is a confident companion for business and leisure. The Audi Q8 launches on the European market in the third quarter of 2018.

For more information, footage and pictures visit:

http://www.thenewsmarket.com/GLOBAL/Audi-AG/the-new-face-of-the-q-family–the-audi-q8/s/c0fc18af-3c3b-4d21-8dcc-8eda4972341c

Graduate Fashion Week 2018

TALENT OF TOMORROW CAMPAIGN

@OfficialGFW | #WEAREGRADUATEFASHION | #GFW18

Now in its 27th year, Graduate Fashion Week continues to bring the latest innovative and exciting emerging talent to the world’s attention, showcasing the fashion innovators of tomorrow with a four-day event in London on the 3rd – 6th June 2018.

Graduate Fashion Week is the largest platform in the world for new BA fashion talent, highlighting the freshest upcoming stars in design, creative direction, marketing, communication, photography, illustration and all aspects of the modern business of fashion. Helping bridge the gap between graduation and employment, the event offers students a unique chance to meet industry contacts, recruiters and brand’s face to face, giving them the opportunity to kick-start their careers within some of the world’s most globally successful brands.

To kick off this year’s campaign, esteemed stylist and photographer Damian Foxe sought out his favourite graduate designs from hundreds of final year entries to be shot at the home of Graduate Fashion Week, The Old Truman Brewery in Shoreditch. Inspired by old school fashion and portrait photography, Damian played with the power of natural light which, when properly harnessed, sculpts the human form and magnifies its natural beauty. Using traditional, manual techniques such as offcuts of fabric and found fragments of paper and glass, he was able to manipulate the light to blur the lines between solid physical reality and pure fantastical imagination, adding drama and atmosphere to the final imagery.

Having already worked with some of the biggest names in cinema, upcoming Austrian actress Coco König modelled in the campaign photoshoot and said, “I think it’s such a wonderful opportunity being able to showcase these real art pieces and it’s an honour to be a part of it.”

The graduates chosen to debut their work in the photoshoot this season embody diverse influences and unique styles, with some focusing heavily on sustainability, using ethical materials and recycled pieces to decrease their harm on the environment. Photographed designs include aspiring designers from British GFW member universities University of Central Lancashire, University of the Creative Arts Epsom, University of East London, De Montfort University and Manchester School of Art. Whilst the Universidad de Vigo, Spain, was the first international school to have a student selected for the shoot and included in the campaign.

Martyn Roberts Managing & Creative Director of Graduate Fashion Week said, The work being produced for 2018 is of the highest calibre and the campaign is truly original and extraordinary, reflecting the talent on show at Graduate Fashion Week. We look forward to seeing the collections used in the campaign on the runway in June.”

Supported by the likes of Lifetime Patrons including Christopher Bailey, Victoria Beckham OBE, Vivienne Westwood DBE RBI and Nick Knight OBE of Show Studio, this year Graduate Fashion Week sees Diane Von Furstenberg and Nadja Swarovski join the ranks as Lifetime Patrons. This news confirms the charity’s growing international reach and the crucial role it plays as a global hub inspiring the world’s top designers.

Additional Global Ambassadors support the messaging of the charity throughout the industry including; Julien Macdonald, Caryn Franklin MBE, Holly Fulton, Gareth Pugh and Henry Holland to name a few and 2018 also sees multiple new premium and high street sponsors such as Levi’s, Superdry and Ralph Lauren join to support the charities goals within the industry.

With 25 catwalk shows including the University Group Show- GFW Collective, this year also sees the expansion of Graduate Fashion Week’s international Fashion Award show, increasing the amount of universities showcased from four back in 2011 to 45+ this year including leading faculties such as Parsons (USA), Shenkar (Israel) and Accademia Costume & Moda (Italy). In addition to the catwalk show featuring looks from the universities top talent, there will be an exhibition space for the international universities which very much focusses on the diversity and celebrates the strengths of each faculty.

Tickets are available now and open to everyone with a passion for fashion and design.

Media attend for free, register here for your ticket: www.graduatefashionweek.com/media

General tickets are on sale now from:     www.graduatefashionweek.com/buy-tickets

THE 2018 GRADUATE FASHION WEEK CAMPAIGN

Evelyne Babin – University of the Creative Arts Epsom

Born and raised in Tanzania, Evelyne Babin’s collection is based on the idea of letting different cultures from various East African dynasties step into conversation over their inherent beliefs and values.  Looking into the arts and crafts of the Swahili people of the island of Zanzibar and the banana leaf craft from her native Chaga village near Mount Kilimanjaro, Evelyne merges floral cut outs with dried banana leaves framed onto hessian and embroidery anglais fabrics designing a collection which portrays the vibrant colours and crafts of East Africa.

Sarah Seb – University of East London

Sarah Seb is passionate about making use of discarded material and lowering consumption waste. The collection explores the process of reconstruction in second hand clothing, as a type of mechanism to avoid the creation of new materials and to lower the impact of waste caused by the fashion industry on the environment. Using second-hand and used clothing creates a direct link to culture and history. Old clothes should not be seen as rubbish but as a canvas for each individual’s self-expression. It is vital that the already accumulated waste is dealt with instead of using more resources and causing damage in the name of fashion.

Rose Connor – University of Central Lancashire

Rose Connor’s collection is based on upcycling plastics’ after her research into oceanography and the effects of discarded plastics and their effects on marine life. Rose developed a technique of fusing newly created fabric, through heat pressing, plastics and in particular ‘bath-time’ plastics such as shower curtains’ and mesh shower sponges. The effects of her material manipulation technique, which is heat formed to the body, has created garments reminiscent of other-worldly silhouettes influenced by underwater coral and marine sea creatures. She had the idea of creating beautiful art work sculptures from the ugly devastating ‘islands of plastic’ that are polluting our ocean environments.

Elizabeth Hargrave – De Montfort University

The collection has been fuelled by the ethos of Russian Constructivism – the relation between human subjects and the mass-produced objects of modernity. Inspiring the design process with “the re-organisation of everyday life and calling maximum attention on the simplest things that surround us”, Elizabeth’s designs are simple but poignant.  She uses sustainable, biodegradable natural fabrics and natural dyes (e.g. berries, roots and tea)  in an attempt to educate and highlight that the use of synthetic fabrics and fabric dyes in fashion contribute to the world’s pollution and that the future of design lies in using these materials and methods that will eliminate the environmental impact of fashion waste.

David Cottington- De Montfort University

David Cottington’s graduate collection “im/maturity” is centred around the concept of maturity and development, something he believes is subjective and not always a negative trait. Each outfit in the collection has its own sub-concept – starting from birth, developing through the stages of life to old age. This really helped David to focus, giving each outfit its own personality but also working towards a cohesive collection.

Queer culture, humour and playfulness are also part of David’s everyday life and therefore translate into the fashion he creates. Hand crafted techniques, like crochet and hand painting are mixed with masculine tailoring and smart sport influences. The garments are intended to be masculine but with a softness.

Libby Bowler – Manchester School of Art

Libby Bowler seeks to combine traditional hand-craft processes with technical details and fabrics to produce innovative garments with a sensibility for sustainable design. Research themes which inspired the development of her graduate collection included mountaineering and naval expeditions, Inuit garment construction processes and the environmental protest group, Surfers Against Sewage.

Libby began the research process with a visit to the Imperial War Museum archive where she was able to handle historic expedition garments and equipment. She continuously studied historic and contemporary garments to aid design and construction skills. The colour pallet was inspired from art works from Tibet, the primary nationality of the Sherpas, who help transport equipment for Everest expeditions. There is also text extracted from survival guides and environmental protests that has been developed into graphic vinyl transfers which is a key process running throughout the collection to express a sense of protest in a playful yet informative way.

Jose Cortizo – Universidad de Vigo

Jose Cortizo has always been inspired by architecture and also honours traditional Japanese culture in his work. ‘Weekend Lovers’ is a fusion of these two inspiring motifs.

Japanese architect Kengo Kuma contributes to the collection his defense for the local, the artisanal that Jose translates into important interiors of dyed cottons, with rough finishes and transparencies in Swiss organdie. Volumes in the garments are achieved through the superposition, fed by the modular repetition, the scaling of patterns and manual pleating. The choice of outer fabrics is essential to give weight to add firmness to the pieces, at the same time as bringing out the duality in terms of quality with which the designer constantly plays. This is then married to the Japanese floral art of crystal embroideries full of delicacy and femininity, creating a masculine collection of great rotundity.

‘Weekend Lovers’ speaks of the casual lovers and the passion with which they relate.

Maria Hassan-Attah – Plymouth College of Art

The collection draws inspiration from Maria’s West African heritage, which is then fused with a contemporary Western twist, reflecting her upbringing in Urban Britain.

Influence has been taken from the rich West African culture Maria has been exposed to. This is articulated through bright, bold shapes and print. Her concept takes further inspiration from West African miner’s uniforms. These have been incorporated into design details, such as baggy silhouettes, strapping and oversized proportions. Also significant is the print, which Maria developed from West African art into her own modern style.

The collection is about celebrating history and heritage but also the multicultural modern world.

Boy – Jose Cortizo – Universidad de Vigo

Girl – Sarah Seb – University of East London

Royal Wedding

Below is an exclusive first-hand commentary from royal wedding expert and British bridal designer, Caroline Castigliano, who was on-site at Windsor Castle covering the royal wedding. She has included commentary on her thoughts of Meghan’s wedding dress and how it compares to past Royal wedding gowns.


What do you think of the outfit overall – dress, veil/tiara, shoes etc?

We have been counting down the days speculating the Royal dress designer and Meghan has made her moment in history wearing Givenchy, Clare Waight Keller…

Meghan has made her entrance in a minimal gown and have certainly differentiated herself from Kate who did it all in lace! Meghan has brought the splendor here with a long veil…

Meghan looks thoroughly modern with her choice of gown and has given her nod to the Royal family and Queen by following the Royal tradition of covering her shoulders and a long sleeve! She entered St Georges Chapel – a moment of history in a simplistic style…

The dress is a boat neck wedding dress is a wonderful style. It’s a wide neckline that follows the curve of the collarbone and ends at the shoulders.

Her hair is gorgeous in a low swept bun!

Meghan is a fresh young American with a million dollar smile the cameras love and she looks fantastic entering the British establishment in a fantastic gown.

Meghan is going into a family that has been seen in the public eye for 1,000 years and has definitely made her mark with this wedding gown…which is quite remarkable in the way it’s so simplistic compared to other dressed we have seen on Diana and Kate!

Meghan has had the World in suspense with what she will wear, and with such high expectations on her she has not failed to disappoint…

Meghan has certainly created a name for herself fashion wise – she is following in the footsteps of Diana who was a fashion icon in the public eye for 16 years… and has done a fabulous modern job!

Royal brides are normally expected to support British designers in the UK rather than choosing designer abroad but Meghan has gone with a French luxury design house here which is a different choice from other Royal brides…

The whole wedding is picture perfect and fairytale like with all of the bridesmaids looking fabulous!

Is it what you expected/predicated?

I believed the gown would be a very straight, fitted dress, with a big 9-foot train coming off the dress from the side to create the drama. I did think she would have a bit of lace and there is some lace detailing on the veils.

I predicted Meghan would have some kind of edge to her wedding dress, but I was certain Meghan’s dress would be classic, elegant with traditional features. I predicted Meghan would give a big nod to the Queen and Royal family with covered shoulders, a long sleeve and high back. But I was expecting Meghan would show her personality by wearing a fitted dress and we haven’t seen a Royal wearing a fitted gown for a long while… I thought a fitted gown would be the way Meghan showed her personality alongside respecting Royal tradition when it comes to Royal gowns. The gown is certainly more fitted than other brides we have seen!

Initially we thought the gown would be Ralph & Russo, but the brand has been in the press a great deal ahead of the wedding, which is an unusual move if they were actually the designer. Ralph & Russo gowns are super expensive so wearing a 100k gown may have seemed ostentations to the public.

Yesterday, our bets were on Stella McCartney, but as Oprah and Amal Clooney both arrived wearing Stella, that was a surprise to us and we thought it must be a different designer if they are wearing Stella… I thought Stella was such a perfect for Meghan as Stella used organic fabrics and her ethos is very much the same as Meghan!

Meghan has totally surprised us wearing Claire Waight, Givenchy! This was totally not talked about in the press at all and they kept it all top secret!

How does it compare to the Duchess of Cambridge’s dress?

The Duchess of Cambridge’s dress was one of lace decorum – she looked super elegant as a bride and Kate gave us a Royal dress to remember.

Meghan has totally differentiated her style here by wearing a plain gown rather than lace and the shaping is totally different as well!

Meghan has a totally different style to Kate when it comes to her hair, Kate loves a good blow dry whereas Meghan prefers wearing her hair up!

Is the dress similar to any other royal wedding gowns? (eg Kate’s was compared to Princess Grace of Monaco’s.)

Kate Middleton’s gown took a style lead from Grace Kelly’s dress, the intricate applique bodice and sleeves of Catherine’s mirrored the wedding. The similarities don’t end there, both gowns shared a high-waist, full-skirt and a long dramatic train and both wore a sheer veil and diamond tiara!

I would say that Meghan has gone quite, Wallis Simpson (almost royalty) – Wallis dress was designed by Mainbocher, it was very modern in its time, much like the look Meghan has gone for. The gown was made of a crepe silk and featured a long slim skirt much like Meghan has gone for here! Wallis was known has a fashion weapon and was a super glamorous art deco women!

How does Meghan’s dress compare to the one she wore in Suits and the dress at her first wedding?

This is the first time we’ve seen a Royal bride very publicly in a wedding gown – since Meghan’s on screen character Rachel on Suits got married. Meghan’s gown is totally the opposite to what we saw in Suits, which was a v-neck gown by Anne Barge, an Atlanta based designer. Her wedding look in Suits was quite bohemian and Princess like compared with Meghan’s demure look today! In complete contrast the wedding gown on Suits was beaded and accessorized with a black belt and Meghan has gone the total opposite today with a minimal accessories and a plain look! Her gown in Suits was certainly sassy but she has had to please the Queen and country today and opt for tradition!