Posts tagged with "depression"

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Depressed Nation: The Generation of the Uneducated

There’s no doubt that depression is increasing throughout the world, particularly in the United States. There are a number of reasons behind this – however, focusing on the problem itself doesn’t really help us find a solution.

What’s important is to address the underlying causes behind the issue so that we can learn how we can work to help fix the problem. In this article, we’re going to be discussing some of the causes of the increased level of depression – particularly the lack of education that we receive regarding mental health – and help point out some potential solutions that we can use to help fix the issue.

Why Are We So Depressed?


Depression has been increasing in the United States for some time. Suicides are increasing at an alarming rate – particularly for men between the ages of 45 and 64. In the US alone, depression has increased in the overall population by almost 1% in the years between 2005 and 2015.

The increase in depression is undoubtedly linked to a society which does not provide its citizens with the proper knowledge, education, or lifestyle opportunities to live happily. Even those who live the “American Dream,” driving rich cars and living with financial wealth, are often depressed. Many of these people commit suicide, as well.

There are lots of reasons that the world is becoming a more depressing place. The most important thing to recognize, however, is that wherever there is a problem, there is a solution. On that note, we’re going to discuss some of the most common reasons that people are experiencing more depression these days.

• Lack of education regarding mental health. Unless you choose to major in psychology or attend a high school that offers psychology as an elective, you probably won’t receive much education regarding depression or mental health in general. It’s not hard to see how this could lead to problems later in life.

Mental health problems are extremely common. In fact, pretty much everyone will deal with a mental health problem at some point in their lives. Unfortunately, most of us have to figure out what these mental health issues are about by talking to friends or family members, or by doing our own research.

Because we’re not educated about these things, one of the most important things that we can do to improve the state of mental health is to educate ourselves and the people that we know. This way, we will at least be able to approach these problems properly when they arise.


• Extreme work hours. Many people are forced to work very long hours – in fact, the standard 40-hour work week is known to cause stress, depression, and anxiety in the majority of people. This often leads to the need to take pharmaceutical medication, which can compound the issue.

Many people find it difficult to avoid the 40-hour grind. One way to avoid this is to begin learning how to make money by practicing your creative talents and finding people interested in them. If you haven’t figured them out yet, don’t give up!


• Lack of purpose / motive. One of the more frightening and existential aspects of our existence is that we don’t really know why we’re here or what our grand purpose is. These spiritual and existential questions are not only dealt with during schooling, they are usually actively banned from the curriculum.

This results in children growing into adults with no idea about what we’re meant to do as human beings, aside from work until we can retire before dying – which is a rather dark perspective that can lead to stark depression. People with a sense of purpose, on the other hand, tend to fare a lot better in life.

One way to develop purpose is to take up some sort of spiritual or meditative practice to approach these questions.

In Conclusion


There are many reasons that people are experiencing more depression in the United States. Fortunately, there are just as many solutions as there are causes.

Wellness Expert Shares Personal Struggle with Addiction & Depression

ADDICITION. Doesn’t discriminate.
ANXIETY. Indifferent to credentials and achievements.
DEPRESSION. Blind to where you live.

By: Dr. Natacha D. Nelson D.C, M.A.

“Look at you, your parents should be disgusted by you”, voices whispered solely for my ears.

“Your black daddy and your white mommy should be ashamed, to get married, to have you…”, their unapologetic words punctured my naive heart. The seed planted.

“A half breed, black girl shouldn’t be raised by a foreign, white woman. You should be taken and given to a proper home”. Their sentiments pierced every cell of my seven year old body. The terror became real.

***

I Attended a private high school and college. And I was an addict. An eating disorder, compulsive exercise and alcohol consumed my life. Desperate to distract myself from painful and uncomfortable feelings, the addictions led to academic probation and ultimately, dismissal from college.

Determined to become successful, I redeemed myself as the doctor of a large successful practice. I became an internationally competing athlete, married, had a family and good friends around me. None of my achievements dissolved the terror restless below the surface. The image I portrayed eclipsed my fear. Not even I noticed the hibernating rumblings.

Skilled at detecting possible threats against me or my mom (whether real or imagined) I blotted out the physical and emotional consequences of undetected anxiety growing fierce. My duty as a protector and provider devoured my time, money, energy and resources. In attempt to thwart perceived threats, I bankrupt myself; physically, emotionally, spiritually and financially. Unable to force myself out of bed, depression ensued.

The proverbial earthquake jolted my life. Demolishing the comfortable walls I erected for safety. Raw and vulnerable, I allowed myself to feel the heartbreak, the grief and the rage. Courageously, I engaged one feeling, one emotion, at a time. Finally willing to acknowledging the terror and pain, I desperately tried circumvent.

Giving my hurt permission to breathe, I began to write. And the healing balm, called Love, soothed my aching heart. Through writing, I was able to sift through four decades of actions and behaviors of my life. Eventually, the “A-Ha” moment revealed itself to me.

*****

The insight that my choices and decisions were unconsciously driven by the need to prove to myself and others, that I was lovable. I wanted to feel accepted, at least tolerated enough, to dissuade others from harming me or my mom.

Unknowingly, my efforts could never hush the unloved parts of me I refused to accept. Other people’s beliefs- about me, my parents and my life- I accepted as true. As long as I held the misbelief that I was unlovable, nothing I could do would override my inner judgments of myself. My outward actions would follow my unconscious beliefs.

My only mistake was to believe the false words of strangers and neighbors. Accepting their judgments as true and accurate. Believing I was bad, wrong, worthless and to be ashamed of. My parents’ marriage-one year after interracial marriage was legalized- to some, was deemed a disgust and my black and white mixed skin was a disgrace.

Once I forgave myself, for choices I made from fear and misinterpretations about myself, the healing began. I could not prove I was loveable if I didn’t believe I was. Accepting I am loveable, I no longer felt the need to prove it; not to myself, to my parents, to anyone. I forgave myself for buying into the unkind words of strangers and neighbors. I Forgave myself for the actions and behaviors I engaged in as a result of the misinterpretations I believed about myself. I Forgave my parents for the mistakes I believed they made in raising me. And forgave the authority figures of my childhood whose unkind words hurt me.

Addictions thwarted my college experience.

Anxiety bankrupt me.

Depression forced me to look at every aspect of my life, lovingly guiding me through the necessary emotional process. The healing work was worth the time and effort. I am finally free.

To you, Beloved Reader. You, too, are loved, are loveable and your life matters.

With Loving,
Natacha.

To learn more about my story, my services, visit:
www.adancingzebra.com
www.lifedoctor.guru
“Finding Courage to Let YOU Out” is available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

About the author
Dr. Natacha D. Nelson D.C, M.A., has dedicated her career to understanding the connections between physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being through principles of Chiropractic and Spiritual Psychology. A practicing chiropractor for over 20 years, she is the owner of Inside Out Wellness Center, as well as a former professional beach volleyball player and advisor on health and wellness for the Santa Clara Fire and Menlo-Atherton Police Departments. She is a Mental Health and Wellness consultant and educator who keeps up on the latest research and attends continuing education seminars and scientific symposia, and has a master’s degree in Spiritual Psychology. She lives in Los Angeles, with her daughter.

Panel for Mental Health re: Social Media

On April 30th, Facebook announced that it will be testing hiding likes on Instagram. Some will be angered by the proposed change but this could be great news for the wellness community, in light of the ongoing studies that have found Instagram to be the most detrimental social networking app for young people’s mental health.

“It’s interesting to see Instagram ranking as the worst for mental health and wellbeing.  The platform is very image focused and it appears that it may be driving feelings of inadequacy and anxiety for young people,” said Shirley Cramer, chief executive of the Royal Society for Public Health.

The Economist reported that while social media gave users extra scope for self-expression and community-building; it also exacerbated anxiety and depression, deprived them of sleep, exposed them to bullying and created worries about their body image and “FOMO” (“fear of missing out”). Studies show that these problems tend to be particularly severe among frequent users and young adults.

In fact, studies have shown an increase in major depressive episodes from 8.7% in 2005 to 11.3% in 2014 in adolescents and from 8.8% to 9.6% in young adults. The increase was larger and statistically significant in the age range of 12 to 20 years, arguably social media’s key demographic.

So the question becomes:What are some tools we could develop to help mitigate the negative effects of social media?

For this year’s Mental Health Awareness Month #GroupDyynamics presents: @YOU Liked Yourself, a two-hour event that corrals peers of the creative industry and successful leaders in the wellness fields to discuss the issues that impact our global community.

Would love for you to stop by if you’re available! Happy to arrange a time for you to speak with any one of our panelists!
About Dyynamics:
 

Launched in 2016, Dyynamics is a niche blog committed to profiling creatives from all walks of life no matter their gender, race or sexuality in order to showcase cultural diversity as the force that lends to the progressive development of humanity.  The site content includes Q&A’s with visual artists and burgeoning musicians, long-form features on enterprising aesthetes, and detailed recaps of sought after events and travel destinations. Our mission is to focus on “more culture, less news”. Our goal is to connect the informed taste-maker to the people who create or purvey contemporary culture.

 
About the Panelists:
 
Bronx native Annya Santana was driven to start a clean beauty brand in response to the lack of transparency and diversity within the beauty industry. Her line “Menos Mas” promotes a lifestyle where less is more and skin care is regarded as skin food. The brand’s goal is to provide a space for the diverse community to celebrate health from the inside out.
 
Liana Naima utilizes energy work. breathwork. vocal release and mindfulness meditation in her practice to silence the mind and induce a transcendent state for healing. 
She has a BA in Philosophy from Bryn Mawr College. M.Ed. from Hunter College. and is a trainee of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program. 
As an energy worker. she is a certified White Light Reiki Master and Vortex Energy Healing® Practitioner.  
 
Model, influencer and self-love advocate P.S.Kaguya dedicates herself to creating content and building a personal brand that promotes the unfiltered expression of individuality in the hopes that others will gain the confidence to do the same. 
 

Actor and comedian Benito Skinner has come a long way since starting his YouTube channel at the end of 2016. What began as a creative outlet quickly gained an excitable young following, with the comedian’s short one-man character sketches and pop culture parodies embraced as a welcome antidote to the relentless news cycle. “Laughing has always been my way of feeling a little better about things,” he adds. As straight men continue to dominate the international comedy scene, Skinner offers a welcome alternative — and young people are responding in large numbers. With over 477,000 followers on Instagram and more than 110,000 subscribers on YouTube, the multi-talented actor is paving his own career path. 

Five Steps for Prevention from Watson Institute Experts

The Majority of Children with Autism Are Bullied—Do You Know How to Help?

Children with autism face unique social and education challenges that require attentive support. 1 in 59 children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Boys are four times more likely than girls to have autism. Autism affects all ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Autism spectrum disorder encompasses a wide range of challenges with repetitive behaviors as well as social and communication skills.

For students with Autism, school can be daunting, as they are faced with social interactions and not feeling accepted. Coupled with that, children with Autism are at higher risk for being victimized or bullied by peers. Nearly two-thirds of children with autism between the ages of 6 and 15 have been bullied—over twice the rate of children without autism. 65% of parents report that their child had been victimized and 50% report being scared by their peers (Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing (2009)).  

These pressures can lead to refusal to attend school, anxiety or depression, and an overall decline in academic performance. This is borne out in the high school graduation rates for students with disabilities, which is only 67.1% (U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics), compared to an overall 84% graduation rate.

Clinical experts from the Watson Institute have five tips on combating bullying among all students, especially those with autism:

  1. Highlight individual strengths. Parents and teachers can be proactive by teaching children that it’s natural to expect others to be just like us, but the things that make us different are often the very things that make us special. Make a habit of complimenting students on their strengths—including in front of their peers.
  2. Widen perspectives. Teaching children to see things from more than one perspective is a key part of developing empathy. Help children connect beyond surface circumstances to underlying emotions. If a child makes fun of a student for not being good at something, ask them to reflect on something that is hard for them.
  3. Praise kindness. Children risk being teased or bullied themselves when they reach out to a student who is being bullied. It takes courage for students to act. Turn this perceived liability into an asset by applauding acts of kindness. This can be done individually, (“I saw how you stood up for Kyle and I’m really proud of you.”) and corporately, through public recognition or incentive programs.
  4. Get involved. If a bullying situation has developed, adult intervention is usually required. Leaving students to “work it out themselves” will often exacerbate or prolong a negative situation. Involve students and parents in addressing the situation. Approach the conversation with a problem-solving, not a punitive attitude.
  5. Provide support. Children can feel a range of emotions—from fear to shame and many more—when they’ve been the victim of bullying. Don’t assume because a child is no longer actively being bullied, that the situation is resolved. Make space for them to talk about their feelings and provide any additional support they need.

ABOUT THE WATSON INSTITUTE

The Watson Institute is organization providing special education programming as well as outpatient mental health services such as social skills groups, therapy, and evaluations for children ages 3 to 21.  www.thewatsoninstitute.org.

Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

The Truth About Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

by Mallory Neuberger

Wendy Williams made headlines last week when she revealed that she’s living in a sober house; but less than one week later she left work, checked out of the facility, and went on to drink alcohol until she was hospitalized. So, what went wrong?

Sobriety is not something that we can pay for. As a recovering cocaine addict, I had to admit that I was an addict and that I was ready for a drug free life. In essence, I had to hit my bottom. Some people die before they find the willingness to get sober. Others need to end up in prison, homeless, or selling their bodies and souls to feed their disease. And many, like myself, don’t lost their homes, cars, jobs or families, but find themselves spiritually void and miserable, with their drug of choice no longer providing the relief that it once had.

Wendy Williams is going through difficulties in her marriage. Her husband is rumored to be cheating on her, and his mistress is pregnant. Despite appearing on television daily, living in a sober house, and paying a sober coach to keep tabs on her 24/7, she still couldn’t handle her heartbreak and to alcohol to numb her pain. The next day she was back on TV. In my opinion, she isn’t ready.

Ethical sober houses keep residents safe by breathalyzing and drug testing them. They have guidelines to provide structure, including curfews, chore checks, and mandatory attendance at 12-step meetings like A.A. or N.A. There are organizations that certify sober houses as good operators, so it’s important to be sure that you are choosing a place that truly has the residents’ best interests at heart.

Sober houses offer a sense of community. They are filled with residents and staff who are all trying to stay sober and meet life head on. There is always someone to talk to, so we are never alone. In my sober houses we emphasize healthy living, encouraging good eating habits and exercise. We practice yoga and we meditate together. We offer fellowship where we eat, laugh, play games, make crafts, listen to music, and sit by the pool. We celebrate together, helping one another get through birthdays, holidays and anniversaries without picking up. We are houses filled with sober women and we are like a big family filled with surrogate mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends. We cry together, and more importantly, we laugh.

Putting down drugs and alcohol seemed like the only way I could live, but what kind of a life was it going to be? I feared that I would be socially awkward without my expensive wines or a frozen margarita with salt. I didn’t think I would be able to stay awake without my beloved cocaine. I was losing my best friends – drugs and alcohol – how would I ever have fun again?

The sheer happiness that I have found as a sober woman is greater than any high that I ever experienced. I wake up every morning without a hangover or user’s remorse. I dance whenever and wherever I can, even while trying on clothes in stores, or at parties where nobody else has hit the dance floor. I run by the beach, singing out loud, without worrying that I may die of a stroke due to last night’s excesses. I practice yoga and can actually “be” on the mat for ninety minutes, breathing freely through my once stuffed nostrils.

I have a disease, and that disease is called addiction. I am no longer ashamed and hiding behind it. Addiction is not a weakness or a character defect. It is a debilitating disease without a medicine to cure it. Money cannot buy my recovery, but working a daily program can keep me sober, one day at a time. Every day I go to a 12-step meeting. I remind myself that I’m an addict in recovery and I reset my brain and ask for the strength to remain sober just for today. I am of service to others in recovery, showing them that this simple program works. It isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it. My worst day sober is always better than my best day high, because I am authentic and free and living the very best version of myself. I hope that Wendy Williams hits her bottom soon, and without any terrible consequences. I would love her to live in one of my sober houses.

About Mallory Neuberger

Mallory Neuberger, MS, CRRA, author of Sober.House (My Story), is the executive director of The Frog Pad, a safe and structured holistic healing house for women in recovery from drugs and alcohol. After struggling with her own addiction, Neuberger has dedicated her life to helping others find sobriety, volunteering at drug recovery centers including Hazelden IOP, The Addiction Institute in NYC, Gods Love We Deliver, and soup kitchens. She was also employed at Behavior Health of the Palm Beaches before opening her first sober house.

Supermarket Soundtrack

LOGIC “DIVES INTO NEW GENRES” WITH SURPRISE RELEASE OF MELODIC SOUNDTRACK TO HIS DEBUT NOVEL “SUPERMARKET”

ORDER THE BOOK & LISTEN TO THE SOUNDTRACK HERE!

LOGIC EMPLOYS GUITAR-DRIVEN, LIVE BAND SOUND ON MELODIC NEW SOUNDTRACK, TEAMS WITH MAC DEMARCO ON SEVERAL TRACKS

“I wanted to use my novel as an opportunity to challenge myself musically diving into a completely new genre”

“Bobby Hall has crafted a mind-bending first novel, with prose that is just as fierce and moving as his lyrics. Supermarket is like Naked Lunch meets One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest—if they met at Fight Club.” —Ernest Cline, #1 New York Times Bestselling author of Ready Player One

From one of the greatest creative voices of this generation, Bobby Hall—aka Logic, the Grammy-nominated and platinum-selling recording artist—comes a dazzling debut novel: SUPERMARKET (Simon & Schuster; Publication Date: March 26, 2019). With this publication, Bobby Hall proves that his incredible artistic talents extend far beyond the walls of a recording studio.SUPERMARKET is a fresh, funny, and deliciously dark thriller that stands on its own as a propulsive and entertaining excursion into madness and creativity.

SUPERMARKET opens with Flynn: depressed, recently dumped, and living at his mom’s house. When he gets a job at Muldoon’s, the local supermarket, he hopes that his boring suburban existence will get a spark of inspiration. A diverse group of eccentric coworkers await him. As Flynn gets accustomed to his new gig and makes some friends, his creative juices start to bubble again—just what he needed to jumpstart his novel based on the people he meets on the job. He even finds himself falling for a colleague who may restore his faith in love.

When Flynn arrives at work one day to a crime scene, he discovers that nothing about the supermarket is what it appeared to be, and the secrets of his tortured mind are revealed as his world collapses. Something seems to be after him at the supermarket, but Flynn isn’t sure that he wants to confront it.

Crackling with dark humor, extraordinary twists, and larger than life characters, SUPERMARKET is a compulsively readable thriller with echoes of work by Quentin Tarantino, Chuck Palahniuk, and Kurt Vonnegut. Bobby Hall flexes his tirelessly creative muscles to create a world that feels so real, you believe you can reach out and touch it. Who knew that you could find sex, drugs, and murder all in aisle nine?

About the Author

Bobby Hall a.k.a. Logic, the Grammy-nominated, platinum-selling recording artist, quickly established himself as one of the most original young stars in music. Through a streak of hit records, Logic has cemented his status as one of the greatest MCs at work, hailed for his lyricism, cinematic storytelling, and inspiring message of peace, love, and positivity. His music touches on societal issues that affect us all, including anxiety, depression, and race. SUPERMARKET is his first novel.

Mental Health Awareness

Mental Health Awareness Days Approaching: April is Stress Awareness Month | May is Mental Health Month

May 7th is National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day

Expert Offers Six Tips for Dealing with Panic Attacks; Dr. Lata McGinn, Cognitive Behavioral Consultants, White Plains and NYC

A panic attack is a sudden, intense episode of fear or dread accompanied by physical symptoms such as pounding heart, sweating, trembling or shaking, lightheadedness, feeling faint, shortness of breath, choking sensations, nausea, abdominal distress, chest pain, cold and hot chills, numbness and tingling, feelings of being detached or things seeming unreal. Individuals with panic disorder fear that they are going to die, go crazy, or lose control. They then begin to fear getting future attacks and will often change their behaviors to ward off panic attacks; a disorder called agoraphobia.

Tip 1: The first thing to remember is that a panic attack is an emotional alarm that is meant to protect us not harm us. Panic attacks, although unpleasant to experience, are not dangerous. Biologically, a panic attack is the fight-flight response or your body’s mechanism designed to protect you from danger.  It is called the fight-flight response because it helps you fight or flee the danger to protect us. If you are in danger, the fight-flight response would create fear and release adrenalin and create an automatic response in us to take immediate action (attack or run). In panic attacks the fight-flight response kicks in even though you are not in any danger.

Tip 2: Panic attacks usually begin right after a stressful life event so focus on dealing with the stress you are under rather than trying to stop the panic attack.

Tip 3: Fearing that panic will harm you ironically only makes you have more panic attacks – your brain thinks you are in danger when you become afraid of panic attacks so the only thing it knows to do to protect you is to give you more panic attacks. Tell yourself you are not in danger and that it is just a harmless panic attack and that it will go away on its own without you doing anything to stop it.

Tip 4: Trying to stop a panic attack in the middle of an episode is not helpful because you are inadvertently telling your brain that you are in danger even though you are not. Letting the panic attack ride over you until it washes away and not changing your behavior to avoid it or escape it is the best thing you can do. Over time, your brain will learn that you are not in danger and the panic attacks will reduce over time.

Tip 5: Deep, slow breathing exercises (slow, diaphragmatic breathing) that helps regulate oxygen and carbon dioxide can be calming and may be helpful to do regularly as a way of calming your over-anxious state in general. However, it is wise not to use it to stop a panic that you are afraid to have in the moment as it likely won’t work anyway and it will also inadvertently convince your brain that you are in danger.

Tip 6: It is best to first to go to a medical doctor when you have your first attack to make sure it isn’t anything like a thyroid condition etc. Once the doctor rules out any physical basis for panic attacks, it is best to not keep going back and taking unnecessary medical tests over and over again. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective in treating panic disorder and agoraphobia. First, individuals are educated about panic attacks and the physical symptoms of anxiety and fear that are experienced.  Second, they are trained on how examine and change their unhelpful thoughts and beliefs that lead to panic attacks in real time. In addition, individuals are trained to reduce physical tension, and are then exposed to physical sensations of panic and to feared and avoided situations and sensations until the person realizes they are not dangerous. Repeated exposure helps to reduce the fear induced by these situations and teaches the person that the sensations experienced are not dangerous. When the fear of the physical sensations is reduced, future panic attacks are reduced.

Dr. Lata K. McGinn

Lata K. McGinn, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and co-founder of Cognitive Behavioral Consultants. She is also a tenured Professor of Psychology, Director of the Doctoral Clinical Program, and Director of the University-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy Training Program for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University/Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Dr. McGinn presents her research worldwide and is regularly invited to conduct keynotes, lectures, seminars and workshops throughout the world to professionals, consumers, schools, agencies, and companies. Her research focuses on vulnerability and prevention of anxiety and depressive disorders. She has recently developed an intervention to prevent the development of depression and has tested the efficacy of this intervention in a NIH funded research study.

About Cognitive & Behavioral Consultants, LLP

CBC is a clinical and training center comprised of internationally recognized mental health professionals who have researched, pioneered, and are highly experienced in delivering cutting edge evidence-based treatments that help adults, adolescents, and children live more fulfilled lives. Founded in 2004 by Drs. Lata K. McGinn and Alec L. Miller, leaders in the fields of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, the CBC team provides a large array of Clinical and Wellness services to the public, provides Custom Designed Programs for schools, agencies, and businesses, and conducts Continuing Education for Professionals in the field of psychology throughout the year. More information can be found here.

“Depression: A Guide to Recovery” Dr Sarmila Sinha

Depression: A Guide to Recovery – Psychiatrist’s Ground-Breaking, Empowering Book Demystifies Depression

Dr Sarmila Sinha’s ‘Depression: A Guide to Recovery’ is an uplifting and actionable guide to the symptoms, causes, treatment and management of depression – possibly the world’s most common yet misunderstood condition. Crammed with relatable case studies, Dr. Sinha ensures anyone with a mood disorder is pulled out of the dark and into a place of power, hope and the understanding that their depression far from defines them.

 United Kingdom – A staggering 15% of the world’s adult population will experience some form of depression in their lifetime yet, considering its epidemic prevalence, depression and associated mood disorders retain a dangerous stigma and disappointing lack of common knowledge. Dr Sarmila Sinha has spent her career specializing in the treatment of mental illness in the general adult population and, in her new book, hands depression sufferers a vital lifeline. ‘Depression: A Guide to Recovery’ does exactly as it says on the cover, without judgment, with dignity and in a way anyone can action.

 Depression: A Guide to Recovery is a comprehensive step by step guide to recognising depression, a common mental health condition. This book uses case examples to provide in-depth information on how to recognise the warning signs of depression, what the possible causes are, how to seek help and the different treatment options. In the modern day society, where people lead busy lives, we have a tendency to neglect our mental and emotional well-being. Within the pages of this book, you will find incredible advice on everything from coping with stress, to the early signs of depression. Using her years of experience, Dr Sarmila Sinha has created a ground-breaking and thoughtful guide, that will provide essential advice to anyone suffering from mental health issues. If you are struggling with low mood, stress or relationship difficulties, Depression: A Guide to Recovery is the ultimate resource to improve your wellbeing, and start living a happier life.

“My goal was to create a resource that gets right to the point, and reaches out to people in despair, in a way that’s comfortable and comforting,” explains the author. “From how they’re feeling inside, to available treatments and even how they can discuss the issues with their family to maximize love and support – it’s all in this book.”

 Continuing, “All of the information is based on hard evidence, and I illustrate as much as is practical with case studies and real-world examples. It’s also of course a vital guide for carers who are unsure of how to best provide care for someone living with a mental health condition, and ensure they themselves remain aware of their wellbeing.”

 ‘Depression: A Guide to Recovery’ is available now: https://www.livinglifestressfree.com.

 Also available on Amazon

 Listen to the author’s podcast, here

 About the Author: Dr Sarmila Sinha, MBBS, MRCPsych, MSc is a Consultant Psychiatrist practising in the UK. She specialises in the treatment of mental illness in the general adult population. She has been a Health and Well-Being Ambassador for doctors at a London NHS Trust. Her special interests include stress among professionals and stigma in mental health.

Logic Set To Debut Novel

LOGIC RELEASES THE TITLE TRACK FROM HIS FORTHCOMING SIXTH STUDIO ALBUM

“CONFESSIONS OF A DANGEROUS MIND”

EXPLOSIVE VIRAL VIDEO RACKS UP 4+MM SOCIAL VIEWS IN 24 HOURS

LISTEN HERE!

WATCH THE VIDEO HERE!

LOGIC SET TO DROP HIS DEBUT NOVEL “SUPERMARKET” NEXT WEEK!

On Sale March 26, 2019

“Bobby Hall has crafted a mind-bending first novel, with prose that is just as fierce and moving as his lyrics. Supermarket is like Naked Lunch meets One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest—if they met at Fight Club.” —Ernest Cline, #1 New York Times Bestselling author of Ready Player One

From one of the greatest creative voices of this generation, Bobby Hall—aka Logic, the Grammy-nominated and platinum-selling recording artist—comes a dazzling debut novel: SUPERMARKET (Simon & Schuster; Publication Date: March 26, 2019). With this publication, Bobby Hall proves that his incredible artistic talents extend far beyond the walls of a recording studio.

SUPERMARKET is a fresh, funny, and deliciously dark thriller that stands on its own as a propulsive and entertaining excursion into madness and creativity.

SUPERMARKET opens with Flynn: depressed, recently dumped, and living at his mom’s house. When he gets a job at Muldoon’s, the local supermarket, he hopes that his boring suburban existence will get a spark of inspiration. A diverse group of eccentric coworkers await him. As Flynn gets accustomed to his new gig and makes some friends, his creative juices start to bubble again—just what he needed to jumpstart his novel based on the people he meets on the job. He even finds himself falling for a colleague who may restore his faith in love.

When Flynn arrives at work one day to a crime scene, he discovers that nothing about the supermarket is what it appeared to be, and the secrets of his tortured mind are revealed as his world collapses. Something seems to be after him at the supermarket, but Flynn isn’t sure that he wants to confront it.

Crackling with dark humor, extraordinary twists, and larger than life characters, SUPERMARKET is a compulsively readable thriller with echoes of work by Quentin Tarantino, Chuck Palahniuk, and Kurt Vonnegut. Bobby Hall flexes his tirelessly creative muscles to create a world that feels so real, you believe you can reach out and touch it. Who knew that you could find sex, drugs, and murder all in aisle nine?

About the Author

Bobby Hall a.k.a. Logic, the Grammy-nominated, platinum-selling recording artist, quickly established himself as one of the most original young stars in music. Through a streak of hit records, Logic has cemented his status as one of the greatest MCs at work, hailed for his lyricism, cinematic storytelling, and inspiring message of peace, love, and positivity. His music touches on societal issues that affect us all, including anxiety, depression, and race. SUPERMARKET is his first novel.

Follow Logic on Social Media

Twitter I Facebook I Spotify I Instagram

“Two Reasons Why I Won’t Report My Child Abuse”

Excerpt from The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook By Steve Simpson

“The first reason is I know that I could be better in school. I know I mess up at home. The clothes I wear. The way I have my hair. The attitude I have. The trouble that I get in. I bring it on myself. If I were a better person these things probably wouldn’t happen to me. Ever since I can remember, I have been told by my parents that all the problems at home are my fault. People have it worse than I do.” These are the thoughts of many who are being abused and the first reasons why they won’t report it.

What I discovered was that even children who do fantastic in school, never get in any trouble, and do everything “right” still get abused by their parents or abusive adults in their home. Their parents even called them the same names as me and they were model children. I’ve found it has nothing to do with the way I act at all. It has nothing to do with who I was. It has nothing to do with the children. It has to do with the adults. Child abuse and discipline have nothing to do with each other. People who abuse children do it because of their own sickness, be it alcoholism, drug abuse or other problems they have.

“I knew my father or my mother’s boyfriend had no right to abuse me but I always felt that my mother would get in trouble for it.” This is the thought of many abuse victims and the second reason why they don’t report it. Even though they are getting abused they still try to protect the non-abusing/co-dependent parent. What I offer to those children is you would not so much be getting your parent in trouble, but you would be getting them help. Most authorities get them to go to therapy, which would stop that parent from allowing abuse to themselves and others in the future, therefore making their life better. So by protecting yourself you’re actually not getting anyone in trouble but protecting them and getting them help as well. Even the abusive adult could end up getting help as a result of you reporting it. Nobody should abuse you, period!

If you are being abused in any way, sometimes the abuse looks like it’s becoming less frequent. Don’t be fooled by this. It could suddenly pick up again and get worse. It will not stop unless you do something to stop it. Speak to a teacher, guidance counselor, school social worker or psychologist. Counselors from community centers and sometimes even people from local churches will know what to do and how to get you help. You can call Child Protective Services for your local area. Nobody should be abused in any way. You are no exception. You are worth getting help.

Approximately 5 children die a day as a result of child abuse. For those who suspect child abuse whether it be a relative or neighbor, it always amazes me how people will call 911 simply because someone parked in the wrong spot or put the garbage out on the wrong night, yet they won’t get “involved” in possibly saving a child’s life or at a minimum their childhood (not to mention the problems they will have as an adult as a result of their abuse). As responsible people we are already “involved”.

If you suspect child abuse it probably does exist. Don’t make excuses or protect and enable the abuser. Protect who you are supposed to protect, the children.

 

About Steve Simpson
Steve Simpson is a child advocate, child abuse survivor and media commentator who just released The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook — a small guide that is modestly tucked inside in all four of his YA adventure novels which covers most of the topics plaguing young people today—suicide, bullying, sexual abuse, physical abuse, verbal abuse, self-worth, being the child of an addict, living in a dysfunctional home, surviving school and more. Simpson was even recognized by President Barack Obama, former New York governor David Paterson and the County Executive of Nassau County for his efforts on behalf of abused children.