Posts tagged with "cognitive behavioral therapy"

Broken heart, self-help, therapy, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

THERAPY TO HEAL YOUR BROKEN HEART  

Renowned UK Psychologist has created a new therapeutic method to help people recover from a relationship breakup. Being entirely conducted online, this self-help treatment is the first of its kind. The Breakup CBT Cure is a structured, self-directed therapy, developed by Dr. Sylvia Buet after a seven-year study to address the emotional pain following a breakup, separation, or divorce. This intensive therapeutic approach uses state-of-the-art cognitive-behavioral techniques to promote adjustment to relationship dissolution. This intensive online therapy allows users to obtain results in just eight weeks, although they have up to 12 months if they wish to go at a slower pace.

The Breakup CBT Cure consists of 24 online sessions, divided into eight modules with almost 15 hours of videos and home tasks. Each module targets a specific problem area people usually struggle with following a breakup. Those eight “stuck points” are: ruminating angrily about the breakup, using proximity-seeking or avoidance strategies, experiencing intrusive thoughts, images, or memories, dwelling on the reasons for the breakup, feeling guilty about ending the relationship, feeling excessively attached to the former partner, and engaging in monitoring or checking behaviors. 

The main benefits of the Breakup CBT Cure include: breaking the emotional bond with the ex-partner, managing upsetting memories and intrusions, eliminating the desire to initiate contact or monitoring, accepting the uncertainty about the reasons for the breakup, letting go of unrealistic expectations of reconciliation, coping with negative feelings such as hurt, guilt, and anger, and developing the confidence to achieve one’s own personal goals without relying on the former partner.

The online treatment is based on evidence-based cognitive-behavioral interventions (CBT) and designed to be as effective as face-to-face CBT therapy. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has been scientifically proven to improve a wide range of difficulties. Still, no protocol had ever been developed until now to apply its powerful techniques to relationship breakups. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps people identify and modify their maladaptive beliefs and behaviors in order to feel better emotionally and improve their mental health.

BABCP accredited Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapist John Dunlop highlights the unique characteristics of the program. Dunlop says, “The Breakup CBT Cure is a radically new form of breakup therapy. This kind of service is not being offered anywhere else, online or offline, because it is based on Dr. Buet’s unique research and methods. It offers tangible results with easy-to-follow and entertaining sessions over eight weeks, making online cognitive behavioral therapy more accessible and user-friendly than ever before.”

Offering the same results as face-to-face CBT therapy, the Breakup CBT Cure is much more cost-effective than traditional counseling because the user can save up to £3000 and go as fast or slow are they wish to obtain the results. Furthermore, a demo video is also available on the official website for people to be able to evaluate the structure and contents before signing up for the entire eight-week program. 

For more information on the Breakup CBT Cure, please visit https://www.breakupcbtcure.com/.

ABOUT THE BREAKUP CBT CURE:

The Breakup CBT Cure is a structured, self-directed therapy, developed by Dr. Sylvia Buet after a seven-year study to address the emotional pain following a breakup, separation, or divorce. This intensive therapeutic approach uses state-of-the-art cognitive-behavioral techniques to promote the adjustment to relationship dissolution. This intensive online therapy allows users to obtain results in just eight weeks, although they have up to 12 months if they wish to go at a slower pace. More information on the Breakup CBT Cure can be on www.breakupcbtcure.com.

ABOUT DR. SYLVIA BUET:

Dr. Sylvia Buet has been working in private practice since 1991 as a Psychologist and a Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapist (anapsys.co.uk and onlinecounsellingclinic.com) both in Spain and the UK for nearly three decades. Buet has trained hundreds of mental health professionals in Europe and the USA. She was a Lecturer at the University of Ulster, teaching cognitive behavioral therapy at a Master’s level. Buet was also the Founder of the International Institute for Cognitive Therapy in Northern Ireland, and a regular presenter at International Conferences. She is an EMDR level II practitioner, specializing in the treatment of adults, particularly OCD (pure obsessions), trauma, and relationship breakups.

Mental Health Awareness

Mental Health Awareness Days Approaching: April is Stress Awareness Month | May is Mental Health Month

May 7th is National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day

Expert Offers Six Tips for Dealing with Panic Attacks; Dr. Lata McGinn, Cognitive Behavioral Consultants, White Plains and NYC

A panic attack is a sudden, intense episode of fear or dread accompanied by physical symptoms such as pounding heart, sweating, trembling or shaking, lightheadedness, feeling faint, shortness of breath, choking sensations, nausea, abdominal distress, chest pain, cold and hot chills, numbness and tingling, feelings of being detached or things seeming unreal. Individuals with panic disorder fear that they are going to die, go crazy, or lose control. They then begin to fear getting future attacks and will often change their behaviors to ward off panic attacks; a disorder called agoraphobia.

Tip 1: The first thing to remember is that a panic attack is an emotional alarm that is meant to protect us not harm us. Panic attacks, although unpleasant to experience, are not dangerous. Biologically, a panic attack is the fight-flight response or your body’s mechanism designed to protect you from danger.  It is called the fight-flight response because it helps you fight or flee the danger to protect us. If you are in danger, the fight-flight response would create fear and release adrenalin and create an automatic response in us to take immediate action (attack or run). In panic attacks the fight-flight response kicks in even though you are not in any danger.

Tip 2: Panic attacks usually begin right after a stressful life event so focus on dealing with the stress you are under rather than trying to stop the panic attack.

Tip 3: Fearing that panic will harm you ironically only makes you have more panic attacks – your brain thinks you are in danger when you become afraid of panic attacks so the only thing it knows to do to protect you is to give you more panic attacks. Tell yourself you are not in danger and that it is just a harmless panic attack and that it will go away on its own without you doing anything to stop it.

Tip 4: Trying to stop a panic attack in the middle of an episode is not helpful because you are inadvertently telling your brain that you are in danger even though you are not. Letting the panic attack ride over you until it washes away and not changing your behavior to avoid it or escape it is the best thing you can do. Over time, your brain will learn that you are not in danger and the panic attacks will reduce over time.

Tip 5: Deep, slow breathing exercises (slow, diaphragmatic breathing) that helps regulate oxygen and carbon dioxide can be calming and may be helpful to do regularly as a way of calming your over-anxious state in general. However, it is wise not to use it to stop a panic that you are afraid to have in the moment as it likely won’t work anyway and it will also inadvertently convince your brain that you are in danger.

Tip 6: It is best to first to go to a medical doctor when you have your first attack to make sure it isn’t anything like a thyroid condition etc. Once the doctor rules out any physical basis for panic attacks, it is best to not keep going back and taking unnecessary medical tests over and over again. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective in treating panic disorder and agoraphobia. First, individuals are educated about panic attacks and the physical symptoms of anxiety and fear that are experienced.  Second, they are trained on how examine and change their unhelpful thoughts and beliefs that lead to panic attacks in real time. In addition, individuals are trained to reduce physical tension, and are then exposed to physical sensations of panic and to feared and avoided situations and sensations until the person realizes they are not dangerous. Repeated exposure helps to reduce the fear induced by these situations and teaches the person that the sensations experienced are not dangerous. When the fear of the physical sensations is reduced, future panic attacks are reduced.

Dr. Lata K. McGinn

Lata K. McGinn, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and co-founder of Cognitive Behavioral Consultants. She is also a tenured Professor of Psychology, Director of the Doctoral Clinical Program, and Director of the University-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy Training Program for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University/Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Dr. McGinn presents her research worldwide and is regularly invited to conduct keynotes, lectures, seminars and workshops throughout the world to professionals, consumers, schools, agencies, and companies. Her research focuses on vulnerability and prevention of anxiety and depressive disorders. She has recently developed an intervention to prevent the development of depression and has tested the efficacy of this intervention in a NIH funded research study.

About Cognitive & Behavioral Consultants, LLP

CBC is a clinical and training center comprised of internationally recognized mental health professionals who have researched, pioneered, and are highly experienced in delivering cutting edge evidence-based treatments that help adults, adolescents, and children live more fulfilled lives. Founded in 2004 by Drs. Lata K. McGinn and Alec L. Miller, leaders in the fields of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, the CBC team provides a large array of Clinical and Wellness services to the public, provides Custom Designed Programs for schools, agencies, and businesses, and conducts Continuing Education for Professionals in the field of psychology throughout the year. More information can be found here.

Handling Your Anger

5 STEPS TO UNDERSTANDING YOUR ANGER AND HANDLING IT EFFECTIVELY IN INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

Anger can be a normal and healthy emotion. So why is it often so problematic? Here are a few signs that your anger may be harmful rather than helpful:

  • I’m often told I have a “bad temper”
  • Others distance themselves from me when I’m angry
  • Expressing anger leads to fighting
  • I don’t feel understood when I’m angry

Let’s take some time to understand anger in a different way.

As normal and as common as anger is, the emotion is frequently misunderstood and mishandled. In today’s day and age, we are taught that we are supposed to let others know exactly how we feel, which can be helpful at times; however, expressing anger is complicated for two main reasons. First, because it is often a secondary emotion, meaning that people often use anger to mask more vulnerable feelings such as hurt disappointment or fear. These feelings may be frightening because they can leave us feeling weak and helpless. This may cause us to resort to showing anger instead so that we can maintain a sense of control. Second, anger can be problematic because expressing anger, in the wrong way, can trigger fear, defensiveness and anger in the recipient. This may cause the other person to begin to protect him or herself instead of trying to understand you.

So What Is Anger?

In its purest form, anger can be a natural response to feeling purposely violated or wronged in some way. When we believe that someone has intentionally violated us, anger can give us the energy to stand up for ourselves. However, the way in which we understand and express our anger can either cause constructive or destructive results.

If expressing anger leaves you feeling misunderstood, or others feeling hurt, angry or shut down, these tips may help.

1. TAKE A MOMENT TO BREATHE

When you notice that you are feeling angry, slowing down your breath can give you a sense of self-control and peace. This will give you time and space to think about your process so that you don’t go on autopilot. If you feel tension in a particular part of your body, breathe relaxation into it.    

2. NOTICE WHAT YOU ARE FEELING

Notice the thoughts that are passing through your mind and the emotions in your body. Is there a tinge of sadness or fear? Are you longing for something? Do you need reassurance? Because many people fear that the other person won’t be there for them in the way they need, these softer feelings often get ignored.  

3. DISCUSS YOUR CONCERNS

Let the other person know that you have some apprehension about sharing your feelings because you fear that he or she won’t be receptive. For example, you may say something like “It’s hard for me to tell you what I need because I think you will judge me.” Once this is in the open, discuss this with the other person until you feel safe enough to share your more vulnerable feelings.

4. BE WILLING TO ADDRESS THE SOFTER FEELINGS

Acknowledging feelings such as loneliness and the desire for acceptance and appreciation can trigger feelings of vulnerability. However, expressing these feelings can connect you to others. When you let someone know your needs, if the dynamic is healthy, the other person will likely try to understand them and help search for a viable solution.

5. BE SOLUTION ORIENTED

Think about your intentions. What are you trying to accomplish by addressing your anger with others? Are you trying to hurt them in the same way you believe they hurt you? If so, this can feed into a destructive pattern of fractured relationships. On the other hand, if your goal is to resolve the issue so that you can build trust and harmony with the other person, then addressing your anger can be helpful. See my blog on Conflict Resolution for detailed steps on how to address conflict.

Understanding and addressing your anger in a way that restores harmony in your relationships can be easy when we focus on the right thing. Call me today for a free consultation so that I can help you change your relationship with anger from one that is harmful to one that creates peace.

 

About Dr. Crystal Clements:

Dr. Crystal Clements is an adjunct professor and registered psychological assistant who practices in Downtown Los Angeles at Sync Counseling Center. She works with adults, adolescents, couples and families to treat depression, anxiety, grief, trauma, and relational issues. She loves what she does and is passionate about helping people feel good about themselves and life. Dr. Crystal earned a PhD in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in Family Studies and MAs in Psychology and Christian Leadership from the Fuller Graduate School of Psychology. She earned a BA in Communications from the University of Pennsylvania. As part of her training, she completed an APA accredited internship in Health Service Psychology at California State University, Fullerton.

Contact her today for a free 15 minute consultation!