Posts tagged with "cocktail"

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

Margot

By Vaughn Lowery x Krishan Narsinghani × Michael Moadeb

Restaurateur Rohan Talwar helms IB Hospitality and owns the illustrious West Hollywood gem, Norahs. A few months ago, he opened the doors to modish and culinary oasis, Margot – complete with exotic dishes, regional wines and special drink menu.

Margot, a Mediterranean infused restaurant composed of various seating and dine-in areas with 360 degree views of West LA, in Culver City is a diamond in the rough. The rooftop (indoor and outdoor seated venue) nests at the top of the PLATFORM (a boutique shopping experience with fashion/pop-ups, wellness and bites) and borders tons of retail, commercial and a new hotel soon erupting. The speedy Expo line train can be seen swiftly running east to west while you sip and/or dine outside and mimics the likes of some of the more prestigious eateries within Brooklyn’s Dumbo area. Similar to the train, rumors have quickly traveled throughout the city that Amazon will begin developing a new location nearby.

‘Hot like fire’ understates the atmosphere at night as the outside appears to be torched with tons of heat lamps in tow. With fresh farm-to-fork ingredients and handmade pastas (try the spaghetti), this place is a soon to be staple within the LA area. The menu constantly changes for an all-inclusive dining experience, including those with strict plant-based diets. Great for romantic dates, celebratory moments and family gatherings on ‘Sunday Funday’ largely due to their tapas as well as fresh raw seafood bar. Talk about delectable oysters. Step foot inside to find every inch of this establishment scream social media engagement wall. Note murals and tapestries all aligned in tune with a modernistic and contemporary ambiance. Service is extremely courteous, helpful and hospitable. And if that’s not enough to keep you coming back, the handcrafted cocktails will. Try their refreshening grapefruit gin and juice or a fruity frosé – worth every penny. It’s about time Culver City got what it deserved – a casual dining experience with budding professionals who seek something edgy, youthful and tasty.

Boost your metabolism before you eat, as SoulCycle is located on the second floor right underneath Margot. Or, after a zesty salad and sandwich at Margot, you may want to head down to the first level to the cozy ice cream shop with a menu of small-batch flavors, Van Leeuwen Ice Cream.

*Margot is open daily from 11am-2am.

Highlights
• Accommodates approximately 150 seated or 350 for reception
• Rooftop patio with dedicated bar accommodates approximately 120 seated or 150 for reception
• Intimate private dining terrace available for approximately 25 seated or 40 for reception
• Social dining options available for weekend brunches, lunch and dinner
• Market driven menu inspired by coastal mediterranean cuisine
• Full service bar with handcrafted cocktails made with fresh ingredients
• Stunning beach and city views throughout

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

Cool Down this Summer with Red Wine Cocktails

Gold Rush Red Mule

  • 4 oz. 1000 Stories Gold Rush Red
  • .5 oz. Marschino
  • .5 oz. Crème de Mure
  • ginger beer
  • Rosemary sprig garnish

Add the wine and liqueurs to a copper mug filled with ice. Top with ginger beer and stir with a bar spoon to incorporate. Garnish with a sprig of fresh rosemary.

Prospectors’ Proof Sour

  • 2 oz. Rye Whiskey
  • .75 oz. lemon juice
  • 1 oz. simple syrup
  • .5 oz. 1000 Stories Prospectors’ Proof

Shake the rye whiskey, lemon juice and simple syrup with ice. Strain into a double old-fashioned glass and fill with fresh ice. Float red wine over the top of the cocktail.

1000 Stories Splash

  • 2 oz. Partida Tequila Blanco
  • 1.5 oz. 1000 Stories Zinfandel
  • .5 oz. fresh lime juice
  • .5 oz. agave nectar
  • 2 oz. grapefruit soda
  • lime wedge for garnish

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake and strain into a glass.

Kahlúa Espresso Martini

KAHLÚA INTRODUCES ITS FIRST EVER RTD ESPRESSO STYLE MARTINI: A REINVENTED CLASSIC COCKTAIL IN A CAN, EQUIPPED WITH SMART NITROGEN, WIDGET TECHNOLOGY

Pop, Pour, Sip… the great taste of the classic Espresso Martini cocktail, now in a ready-to-drink can launches with ASMR-Style video

Kahlúa, the number one coffee liqueur in the U.S. and hero ingredient in your favorite cult cocktails, brings consumers the next iteration of a classic with the launch of the Kahlúa Espresso Style Martini ready-to-drink (RTD) cocktail.  Kahlúa Espresso Style Martini RTD is a twist on the classic Kahlúa cocktail made with coffee…and in a can. It’s the perfect blend of Kahlúa, coffee and Vodka, complete with the signature creamy foam reminiscent of a just-made Espresso Martini cocktail.

How does it work? The unique can is fitted with a smart nitrogen widget, which forces bubbles to the surface as soon as the can is opened to form the distinctive creamy foam of the classic cocktail. To serve, pour into a glass and enjoy immediately (with a friend, of course). To help illustrate for consumers at-home, Kahlúa tapped in to the trend of ASMR (autonomous sensory meridian response) to create the Kahlúa ASMR-tini depicting the pop and foam intensity of the product.

To celebrate the launch, Kahlúa is getting out of the glass and in front of the microphone with an ASMR-tini video to help consumers experience the pop and fizz that goes into every can.

“The launch of the Kahlúa Espresso Martini RTD and our ASMR-tini campaign celebrates a really exciting time for the brand,” said Troy Gorczyca, Kahlúa Brand Director. “As consumers continue to ask for high quality cocktails with added convenience, our take on the Espresso Martini offers an innovative and simple way to enjoy one of our favorite classic cocktails. Plus, it delivers consistent flavor and quality every time you pop and pour.”

The Kahlúa Espresso Style Martini is launching nationwide at select retailers this Spring 2019. The Espresso Martini will be sold in packs of four and each can is 4.5% alcohol by volume (ABV).

For more information about Kahlúa, please visit www.kahlua.com and check out Kahlúa on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter by following @Kahlua. Kahlúa ASMR-tini video and assets can be found via link here.

About Pernod Ricard USA

Pernod Ricard USA is the premium spirits and wine company in the U.S., and the largest subsidiary of Paris, France-based Pernod Ricard SA, the world’s no. 2 in wines and spirits. The company’s leading spirits and wines include such prestigious brands as Absolut® Vodka, Chivas Regal® Scotch Whisky, The Glenlivet® Single Malt Scotch Whisky, Jameson® Irish Whiskey, Malibu®, Kahlúa® Liqueur, Beefeater® Gin, Seagram’s Extra Dry Gin®, Martell® Cognac, Hiram Walker® Liqueurs, Pernod®, Ricard® and Avión® Tequila; such superior wines as Jacob’s Creek®, Kenwood® Vineyards and Brancott Estate®; and such exquisite champagnes and sparkling wines as Perrier-Jouët® Champagne, G.H. Mumm™ Champagne and Mumm Napa® sparkling wines.

Pernod Ricard USA is based in New York, New York, and has roughly 650 employees across the country. Pernod Ricard USA urges all adults to consume its products responsibly and has an active campaign to promote responsible drinking. For more information on this, please visit: www.responsibility.org.

 

Joseph Magnus National Growth Strategy

D.C.-Based Heritage Spirits Brand Joseph Magnus Unveils National Growth Strategy

Initiatives include strengthened leadership team, expanded distribution and warehousing, new product introductions and revitalization of its D.C. cocktail room

Jos. A. Magnus & Co., a 127-year-old award-winning spirits brand, today announced details of its aggressive national growth strategy. Key initiatives include an expanded and experienced leadership team, broadened national distribution and barrel warehousing capabilities and the launch of several Magnus special releases in 2019.

In addition, Magnus revealed plans to temporarily close and refurbish its Washington, D.C. cocktail room, consistent with the brand’s legacy. Updates will include the addition of pre-Prohibition artifacts on loan from the Magnus family archives, with the cocktail room expected to reopen in spring 2019.

The company’s bourbon and gin products are now available across 28 states, including California, New York, Texas, Illinois and Georgia. The leadership changes announced include:

  •         Ali Anderson has been promoted to general manager of Magnus from her previous position as director of sales. In her new role, she will work alongside a nationwide distributor of premium and craft spirits to leverage the company’s scaling production capabilities.
  •       Nancy Fraley, Master Blender, who has overseen the production of many of Magnus’ award-winning bourbons, including Joseph Magnus Bourbon, Cigar Blend Bourbon and Murray Hill Club, will continue to guide the Magnus production team and create several special releases for 2019.
  •         Thom Spelde joins Magnus as vice president of production, bringing more than 20 years of experience in the manufacturing industry to the Company. Peter Boardman joins Magnus as distiller from Philadelphia Distilling Co., maker of Bluecoat Gin. He has 10 years of distilling experience. Both Spelde and Boardman will oversee production and the construction of a new barrel warehouse facility in Virginia to meet growing demand.

“We are excited by the opportunity to share the Magnus experience with customers in twenty-eight states,” commented Ali Anderson. “We will continue to deliver remarkable spirits to connoisseurs in D.C. and across the country.”

For more information about Jos. A. Magnus & Co. or to purchase spirits, visit josephmagnus.com.

About Jos. A. Magnus & Co.

Inspired by the legacy of pre-Prohibition distiller Joseph Magnus, the premium bourbon and gins of Jos. A. Magnus & Co. promise “remarkable spirits for remarkable people.” Building on 127 years of rich history, the company now distributes premium spirits in 28 states and delights patrons at its distillery and tasting room located in Washington, D.C. The spirits have garnered the nation’s top awards, including multiple double gold medals, and best-in-class bourbon and gin recognitions, using the very same techniques that Joseph Magnus practiced more than 100 years ago. For more information on Jos. A. Magnus & Co. spirits, legacy and distribution, visit josephmagnus.com.

 

The Milestone Hotel And Residences Launches “Practically Perfect” Stay

The award-winning five-star Milestone Hotel & Residences, a quintessentially British mansion-hotel located opposite Kensington Palace and Gardens, is offering a “Practically Perfect” hotel stay starting from November 1, 2018. This suitably British experience includes an overnight stay in supreme luxury, whether in a room or suite, full English breakfast for two and a number of Mary Poppins-inspired activities.

Upon arrival, young guests will be given a “silver” chocolate tuppence which they can exchange for a bird-feeding kit from The Milestone’s concierge team. During their stay in the heart of Kensington, children can use the kit to feed the ducks in Hyde Park located nearby. If the weather is right, guests can also opt to fly a kite “up to the highest height!” in the Italian Garden at Kensington Gardens. Children can even take their brand-new kite home with them priced at £40 (approx. US$52).

The Milestone’s signature “Most Delightful Way” mocktail

The special hotel stay also includes a Spoonful of Sugar Afternoon Tea for two – a newly introduced afternoon tea concept created by the hotel’s kitchen team that captures the fun and frivolity of the story with a variety of cleverly themed pastries. Menu items include a chocolate pastry in the shape of Mary Poppins’ iconic floral hat, a black “chimney sweeps” macaron, a cupcake served with a chocolate spoon(ful of sugar) and many other sweet treats. A children’s version of the afternoon tea also includes kite-shaped biscuits covered in cherry ganache. Guests can taste The Milestone’s new Little Nip from Every Sip cocktail with their afternoon tea, made with muddled raspberries, peach liqueur, peach purée, orange juice and ginger ale, while little guests can enjoy the mocktail version called the …Most Delightful Way, served in a special medicine bottle.

Continuing with the theme of the Mary Poppins story, guests will also receive a red carnation buttonhole, just like Mr. Banks wore on his lapel in the original Disney film. Guests may notice that all Milestone hotel staff also pin a red carnation to their lapels, a signature of the Red Carnation Hotel Collection, of which The Milestone Hotel is a member.

The “Practically Perfect” hotel stay is valid from November 1, 2018 until January 31, 2019, and starts at £540 (approx. US$696) per night, based on two people sharing a Classic Double Room. Walk-in guests can also enjoy the Spoonful of Sugar Afternoon Tea in the hotel’s Park Lounge between November 1, 2018 and January 31, 2019 and is priced at £50 (approx. US$64) per person. The children’s version of the afternoon tea is priced at £25 (approx. US$32) per child under 12. Afternoon Tea is served daily at 1pm, 3pm and 5pm.

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

SMIRNOFF PEPPERMINT TWIST COCKTAIL RECIPES

1.       Winter Whisperer

·         1.5 oz Smirnoff Peppermint Twist

·         .75 oz pomegranate syrup

·         .75 oz fresh lemon juice

·         8 mint leaves

·         2 oz Club Soda

 

2.   Cranberry Pineapple Punch – Courtesy of Karly Gomez from A Simple Pantry

·         1 gallon 100% cranberry juice (not cranberry cocktail)

·         1 46 oz can pineapple juice

·         3 cups lemon-lime soda

·         3 cups Smirnoff No. 21 vodka

·         Sliced oranges, oranges, lemon (optional)

·         Fresh cranberries (optional)

 

3.   Nutcracker

·         1 oz Smirnoff No. 21 Vodka

·         .5 oz Amontillado Sherry

·         1 oz organic pear juice

·         1 oz fresh lemon juice

·         1 oz orgeat syrup

 

4.  Chocolate Peppermint Martini – Courtesy of Kendra Darr from Simply Darrling

  • 4 ounces Smirnoff Peppermint Twist Vodka
  • 2 ounce crème de cacao
  • 1 ounce chocolate liquor
  • 2 ounce cream chocolate sauce & crushed peppermint for garnish

 

5.   Gingerbread Martini – Courtesy of Kendra Darr from Simply Darrling

  • 3 ounces Smirnoff No. 21 Vodka
  • 3 ounces Irish cream
  • 2 Tablespoons gingerbread syrup (or to taste)
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 ounces cream
  • Whipped Cream & Crushed Gingerbread cookies for garnish

 

6.   Holiday Bliss

·         1 oz Smirnoff Peppermint Twist

·         .5 oz Don Julio Añejo Tequila

·         3 oz Rich Chocolate Milk

 

7.   Kissed Caramel Apple Punch – Courtesy of Karly Gomez from A Simple Pantry

  • 1 ½ gallons spiced apple cider
  • 1 12.2 oz bottle caramel syrup
  • 3 cups Smirnoff Kissed Caramel Vodka
  • Sliced apples (optional)
  • Cinnamon sticks (option)

 

8.  The Original Mule

·         1.5 oz Smirnoff No. 21 Vodka

·         Fresh lime juice

·         3 oz. ginger beer

More Smirnoff

MILK & HONEY TAPAS

​”If you don’t love this industry [Food and Beverage] then don’t do it … the amount of time is overwhelming.” – Al Rojas 

By Vaughn Lowery

Nearly twenty years ago, Al Rojas received some investment capital from his father (died from cancer 25 years ago) to become a restaurateur. After years of successfully running Santa Barbara’s widely popular Alcazar Tapas Bar, he commenced to sink his teeth into another endeavor – Milk & Honey Tapas [MHT]. This eclectic, snug cafe with curbside dining provides an array of mystical libations and mouth watering snacks for foodies. 

Specialty cocktails are their strong suit; however, the drinks are so intoxicating that you’ll have to taste their menu. After one drink, we were buzzing like busy bees in the hive. Hence, we started with flash-fried kale chips topped with manchego cheese and an order of Prosciutto Bundles stuffed with goat cheese. Yummy. Next up, we ordered PB&J Sliders (sirloin sliders, peanut butter, raspberry jam, Applewood smoked bacon) and Honey Lamb Pops (char broiled lamb chops; teriyaki, honey, butter, shallot, brown sugar sauce) – yes, we licked both our fingers and the bones. One of the most intriguing indigenous dishes we tried was Por-Que Pig?! (pulled pork shoulder, creamed pasilla chiles, garlic cilantro rice, manchego cheese, fresh cilantro, tomato; tomatillo cream sauce). Definitely not one of the most attractive items on the menu, but it sure was the most delightful – we scraped our bowls. For dessert, we received their house funnel cake alongside of a dark cup of coffee. 

Rojas boasts of being a globetrotter (Spain, France, UK, Grenada, Copenhagen, Montreal) and reminds us that his infused assortments were inspired by his travels. Adorning smart specs and possessing a charismatic personality, no wonder his wait staff is equally professional and attentive – his power to lead permeates the air. Something that his father instilled in him, “Treat everyone equally [no matter what their position in life may be].” Moreover, the fun-loving GM and crew kept the dimly lit dinner service packed like a can of sardines. 

In short, this is one of the best tapas and sips we have put our lips on in a long time. In fact, Milk & Honey Tapas rivals some of the top restaurants in New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles. If you possess an appetite for tangy handcrafted concoctions paired with savory bites, then this place will literally blow your wig back.

#360Recommended #IssaSnack 

http://milknhoneytapas.com

FUN FACTS:

Alcaraz Tapas Bar was established about 18 years ago and it’s Ginspiration Point cocktail was named the Official Drink of Santa Barbara.

Milk & Honey Tapas has been in business for over 11 years to date.
Al Rojas lends his name and support to 

Community Counseling and Education Center (CCEC) of Santa Barbara: a non-profit which offers family counseling services for victims of domestic violence and addiction.