Posts tagged with "climate change"

UN Climate Report

To Tackle Climate Change We Need to Rethink Our Food System By Kathleen Rogers and Dr. Shenggen Fan

The way we produce, consume and discard food is no longer sustainable. That much is clear from the newly released UN climate change report  which warns that we must rethink how we produce our food and quickly to avoid the most devastating impacts of global food production, including massive deforestation, staggering biodiversity loss and accelerating  climate change. While it’s not often recognized, the food industry is an enormous driver of climate change, and our current global food system is pushing our natural world to the breaking point. At the press conference releasing the Special Report on Climate Change and Land, report co-chair Eduardo Calvo Buendía stated that “the food system as a whole which includes food production and processing, transport, retail consumption, loss and waste is currently responsible for up to a third of our global greenhouse gas emissions.”

In other words, while most of us have been focusing on the energy and transportation sectors in the climate change fight, we cannot ignore the role that our food production has on cutting emissions and curbing climate change. By addressing food waste and emissions from animal agriculture, we can start to tackle this problem. How do we do that?

Livestock production is a leading culprit driving deforestation, degrading our water quality and increasing air pollution. In fact, animal agriculture has such an enormous impact on the environment that if every American reduced their meat consumption by just 10 percent about 6 ounces per week we would save approximately 7.8 trillion gallons of water. That’s more than all the water in Lake Champlain.

We’d also save 49 billion pounds of carbon dioxide every year the equivalent of planting 1 billion carbon-absorbing trees. What’s more, to the injury from unsustainable food production, we add the insult of extraordinary levels of food waste: nearly one third of all food produced globally ends up in our garbage cans and then landfills. We are throwing away $1 trillion worth of food, or about half of Africa’s GDP, every single year. At our current rates, if food waste were a country, it would be the world’s third-largest carbon emitter after the U.S. and China. 

To ensure global food security and sustainable food practices in an ever-growing world, we need to reexamine our food systems and take regional resources, such as land and water availability, as well as local economies and culture into account. To start, the United States and other developed countries must encourage food companies to produce more sustainable food, including more plant-based options, and educate consumers and retailers about healthy and sustainable diets. Leaders must create policies that ensure all communities and children have access to affordable fruits and vegetables. And we all can do our part to reduce food waste, whether it’s in our company cafeterias or our own refrigerators.

Technology also plays a part. Developed countries should support and incentivize emerging innovative technologies in plant-based foods, as well as carbon-neutral or low-carbon meat production.

Developing countries, on the other hand, face high levels of undernutrition, as well as limited access to healthy foods. Many nutrient-dense foods (such as fruits, vegetables and quality meats) are highly perishable, often making prices significantly higher than ultra-processed, nutrient-poor and calorie-dense foods. The high cost of nutrient-dense foods creates a significant barrier to healthy diets, as seen in urban Malawi and many other countries.

By promoting enhanced production of healthy and nutritious foods while also improving markets in low-income countries, we can lower prices and increase accessibility of healthy and sustainable diets. Politicians can also tackle systemic inequalities by redirecting agricultural subsidies to promote healthy foods, as well as investing in infrastructure like rural roads, electricity, storage and cooling chain.

Change must happen at every level if we want to build a better food system. International participation and resource-sharing can spread regional solutions across countries. And working for change at the ground level among individuals, communities, local and federal governments and private entities can help fight hunger and food inequality firsthand.

Yes, our food system is broken, but not irrevocably so. The challenges are enormous, but by understanding the problem and potential solutions, we can effect critical changes in the ways we produce, consume and dispose of food.

Climate Catastrophe

LG Williams and The Estate of LG Williams™ are pleased to present Don’t Look At That Tree, his newest monumental outdoor artwork installed at City Park in Streator, Illinois.

Don’t Look At That Tree consists of a 100-foot-high hickory tree strewn with several rolls of yellow crime scene tape. Visitors can view the artwork on June 28, 2019 and it will remain visible to the public until June 30, 2019. The artwork will be situated at the intersection of Park and Hickory streets, near the park’s entrance.

This artwork explores The Mechanism of Denial, a defense mechanism first proposed by Anna Freud which involves an individual or groups refusal to accept reality, thus blocking external events from awareness. “So far”, writes LG Williams, “our response to the challenge of our climate catastrophe exposes a fundamental failure of collective engagement and imagination.”

 

MIT: Millennials Drive A Lot

While it is common to believe that Millennials are fundamentally disrupting a wide variety of industries due to their divergent preferences—especially the car industry—new research from MIT suggests that this is not the case.  

“Many Millennials report they prioritize environmentally friendly products,” says Christopher Knittel of the Sloan School at MIT, but our study shows that the so-called “Green Generation” does not exhibit significantly different preferences when it comes to transport. And that’s bad news for the environment and our battle with climate change.”

The study, Generational Trends in Vehicle Ownership and Use: Are Millennials Any Different? by MIT Sloan School Professors Christopher R. Knittel and Elizabeth Murphy http://ceepr.mit.edu/publications/working-papers/700 focused on two main facets of personal mobility: vehicle ownership, measured by how many vehicles a given household owns, and vehicle usage, measured by annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT). Each of these provides different insights; vehicle ownership gives a better understanding of the market for personal vehicles, while vehicle miles traveled provides insight on vehicle fleet usage as well as environmental footprints. 

The authors found that although a simple comparison of average ownership and use would suggest a difference, once you control for confounding variables there is no evidence of a difference. While we find that Millennials are altering life-choices that affect vehicle ownership, the net effect of these endogenous choices is to reduce vehicle ownership by less than one percent. 

“These results underline the important of policy in addressing climate change,” says Knittel. “The low vehicle ownership statistics we’ve been quietly hoping will solve climate change are an artifact of the economic conditions and general life cycles Millennials have faced and do not represent some fundamental difference in their demand for cars.”

Despite the fact that many Millennials report that they prioritize environmentally friendly products, the so-called “Green Generation” does not exhibit significantly different preferences when it comes to transport. This does not inherently mean Millennials do not consider the environment in their auto-buying decisions, but for many Millennials having a vehicle may not be a choice. 

CMRubinWorld and Race Issues

In a new interview with CMRubinWorld, Diversity/Inclusion expert and Cultural Anthropologist Dr. Michael Baran discusses his interactive web-based program that stimulates productive dialogue on the complex issues surrounding race.

Deepening divides fragment our societies and our economies. How can modern technologies help us to find the common ground and bring us closer together? Interactive Diversity Solutions (IDS) has created a web based program called “Don’t Guess My Race” to support teaching diversity issues. The CEO of IDS, Michael Baran, says the inspiration for the program came from research studies with children in Brazil. In Baran’s studies, he asked children to describe pictures he had taken of people’s faces. What he discovered was that this exercise sparked “extremely rich conversations about sensitive topics.” What if photographs could be used to create an interactive race awareness? In an increasingly interconnected world, race, identity and sexuality are often left undiscussed because for many, these are challenging topics and it’s difficult to find the right “space” to do it in an effective way. Yet it is a critical challenge for which all the world seeks solutions. “We want children to see how the world doesn’t come in bounded natural groups, but that there are spectrums of differences and multiplicities of intersecting identities that overlay this difference,” says Baran.

Read the full article here

About Michael Baran

Michael Baran is a cultural anthropologist with over twenty years experience conducting and organizing ethnographic research for social change on a variety of issues, including race and identity, racial disparities in education, violence against children, healthy housing, environmental health, human services, criminal justice reform, immigration reform, climate change, and early childhood development. He currently consults for businesses, schools and non-profits on issues related to diversity and inclusion, often incorporating the digital tools developed at Interactive Diversity Solutions as part of a blended approach.

About The Global Search for Education

CMRubinWorld’s award-winning series, The Global Search for Education, brings together distinguished thought leaders in education and innovation from around the world to explore the key learning issues faced by most nations. The series has become a highly visible platform for global discourse on 21st century learning, offering a diverse range of innovative ideas which are presented by the series founder, C. M. Rubin, together with the world’s leading thinkers.

For more information on CMRubinWorld check out their website here and follow @CMRubinWorld on Twitter.

People, Prosperity and the Planet

Student Teams from Cornell University and New Jersey Institute of Technology Awarded $45,000 EPA Grant for Innovative Technology Projects

This week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $45,000 in funding for three student teams through its People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) grants program. Student teams from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and Cornell University are receiving funding to develop sustainable technologies to help solve environmental and public health challenges.

“EPA’s P3 grants program supports the next generation of scientists and engineers,” said EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler. “These students are able to take what they learn in the classroom and apply it to real-world environmental problems that require innovative solutions.”

“Students at New Jersey Institute of Technology and Cornell University are creating affordable, sustainable solutions to the real issues we are challenged by in Region 2,” said EPA Regional Administrator Pete Lopez. “These students are applying science and cutting-edge technology to tackle important environmental threats to our lakes and the quality of our drinking water.”

Grantees include student teams from the following universities:

  • New Jersey Institute of Technology – Newark, N.J.: The student team from NJIT is devising a sustainable process based on reactive nanobubbles technology to control and mitigate harmful algal blooms.
  • New Jersey Institute of Technology – Newark, N.J.: The student team from NJIT is developing a novel device that will remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from drinking water.
  • Cornell University – Ithaca, N.Y.: The student team from Cornell University is developing a pump with the goal of zero electricity drinking water treatment.

The P3 competition challenges students to research, develop and design innovative projects that address a myriad of environmental protection and public health issues. The Phase I teams will receive grants of up to $15,000 each to fund the proof of concept for their projects.

The Phase I recipients will attend the TechConnect World Innovation Conference and Expo in Boston, Mass., on June 17-18, 2019, to showcase their research. They can then apply for a Phase II grant that provides funding up to $100,000 to further the project design.

These students, who represent the future workforce in diverse scientific and engineering fields, are following in the footsteps of other P3 teams. Some of these teams have gone on to start businesses based on ideas and products developed through their P3 project. In 2018, a previous P3 Phase I awardee from Oklahoma State University (OSU) leveraged P3 funding to initiate their research to develop a cost-effective approach to enhance energy efficiency in wastewater treatment. In furthering their P3 project, OSU transformed the research into a business plan and won the Queen’s Entrepreneurs’ Competition with its startup business plan for Contraire, a predictive analysis control system designed to provide near real-time wastewater test measurements. Amongst 15 other teams, OSU pitched their business plan to a panel of Canadian business leaders and received multiple inquiries from investors.

More Information

To learn more about the P3 projects, visit here

For more information on the P3 Program, visit here

Follow EPA Region 2 on Twitter and visit our Facebook page.

Waterproofing New York

With two destructive tropical storms in two years, New York City — like many other global cities — is entering a phase of adaptation to catastrophic climate events which are a result of carbon cycle disruption by human, urban, and industrial practices. Recovery will require more than a simple fix; it will necessitate systemic adaptation to escalating tidal and storm surges, precipitation, and wind events through the construction of new urban landscapes that have the capacity to merge social, cultural, and environmental forces.

Waterproofing New York gathers some of the most influential and thought provoking municipal leaders, engineers, planners, social scientists, and designers to explore the impact of past and future storms on New York City’s infrastructural systems: Water/Waste, Power/Data, Circulation/Fuel, Parks/Recreation, and Shelter. The essays and projects collected here use these urban operating systems to open speculation on possibilities not simply for waterproofing the city but for thinking beyond it to seek wider means of coordinated yet opportunistic, pragmatic, and inventive city design. Waterproofing New York is intended to support an emerging skepticism of a singular “big fix” as well as of the unplanned, uncoordinated, shoring up of individual enterprises and discrete sites that will ensue in the absence of design and civic leadership.

About the Editors

Denise Hoffman Brandt, RLA, is the Director of Landscape Architecture and an Associate Professor at the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at the City College of New York. She is Principal of Hoffman Brandt Projects, LLC.

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson is an Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at the City College of New York and Principal of Catherine Seavitt Studio.

The Porto Protocol: A Solution-Driven Forum for Fighting Climate Change

Robin Daniel Lail, founder of Lail Vineyards, has been appointed the U.S. representative for The Porto Protocol. She is currently the only U.S. representative – and one of three representatives worldwide. Lail joins Pancho Campo of Spain, the CEO of Chrand, and Adrian Bridge of Portugal, director general of The Fladgate Partnership. Bridge is the founder of The Porto Protocol and leads the organization’s solution-driven forum for fighting climate change.

Established in Porto, Portugal – one of the world’s great wine capitals and home to some of Europe’s most diverse vineyards – The Porto Protocol is taking the lead in reducing the effects of climate change by simply asking their members to do more than they are currently doing to reduce their impact on the environment. The Porto Protocol is focused on creating a database of peer case studies so that business leaders can quickly learn what steps their colleagues are taking that they can also emulate and implement.

“In Napa Valley, growers and vintners are already actively engaged in protecting the environment as we farm for our grandchildren,” said Lail. “We are re-evaluating our farming practices at Lail Vineyards and my goal as The Porto Protocol’s U.S. representative is to reach out to farming communities across the country to do the same. Together, we have the opportunity to create a really loud voice.” 

The Porto Protocol sprung from the wine industry because grape farmers are especially vulnerable to the impact of climate change. The organization’s goal is for leaders in all industries to share their expertise and wisdom through their case studies to inspire their peers to make changes that will mitigate the effects of climate change.

Robin Daniel Lail is a fourth generation vintner and the founder of Lail Vineyards. Along with her family, she has produced some of the most elusive, coveted wines in Napa Valley. As a descendant of one of Napa Valley’s founding families, the story of Robin Lail’s life is woven into the history of the Napa Valley. Her great-granduncle Gustave Niebaum established Inglenook in 1879 and her beloved father, John Daniel, Jr., created wines that are regarded among the best of the 20 century. The wines of Lail Vineyards are born from generations of winemaking knowledge in Napa Valley, a legacy that remains Lail’s steadfast compass.

Eco-tourism

Eco-tourism: the sexy growing trend in travel

Traveling the world, while saving the planet – sounds too good to be true. Yet, eco-tourism – travel intended to support conservation efforts while enjoying nature – dates back to the 70s and has been growing in popularity in recent years.

The trend’s resurgence takes shape as sustainability and green living are becoming the buzzwords of the 21st century. So much so that a recent study shows that responsible travel is outpacing overall growth in the trillion-dollar-plus tourism industry.

Many are skeptical of the recent boom in eco-tourism’s popularity, questioning the motives of travelers journeying to obscure places through programs that conserve sea turtles, whales, even rhinos and chimpanzees. However, no matter the rationale behind travelers’ decisions to book an eco-driven trip, the positive outcome of these programs on the environment is undeniable, when properly organized. By simply traveling to the world’s parks and reserves, tourists are helping to protect those wilderness areas by paying park fees and contributing to a local economy that supports conservation efforts. For more adventurous travelers, however, there are charitable opportunities for scuba divers and nature explorers alike to get involved while taking a well-deserved getaway.

Expeditioners can dive into the epicenter of global marine biodiversity aboard a liveaboard ship in Raja Ampat, explore the “soft coral capital of the world” in Fiji, or travel to Kenya and gain an insider’s look at wildlife conservation in the savannas and seas of the region.

Last year alone, Oceanic Society, America’s oldest non-profit organization dedicated to ocean conservation, saw more than 1,400 hours of conservation-related volunteering logged by its travelers.

Founded in 1969, the organization leads more than 40 trips annually, with destinations across 16 countries, to ensure there is a trip for any interested traveler to help improve ocean health by deepening their connections with nature. Oceanic Society also leads whale watching expeditions in the San Francisco Bay area nearly every weekend of the year.

By participating in an eco-tourism expedition, participants become an active member in a global effort to build a healthy future for the oceans and environment. And who wouldn’t love a vacation that has an added feel-good bonus to it?

Ice Culture

Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents: Ice Culture

Art, Music & Lit from the Arctic Circle to Antarctica

Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents: Ice Culture explores the beauty and mystery of our world’s ice, and reveals the necessity of ice to our human survival. The project explores the traditions and cultures of people connected to ice from the Arctic Circle to Antarctica, and raises vital concerns about climate change that can no longer be ignored. As climate change affects the weather and composition of our planet, our ice continues to melt. This reality affects all of us, regardless of where we live.

Black Coffee & Vinyl Presents: Ice Culture, a website and literary magazine publication, features art, music and literature by artists living and working in Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Canada, Germany, US and more. Mixing poetry, essays, interviews, visual art and sound art, the project explores the myriad of ways ice touches our lives.

Ice Culture celebrates the physical and spiritual nature of ice. Ice has soul. It has a song. Ice radiates; it glows. It’s precious. Ice is a resource. Ice Culture showcases ice in all of its forms, from majestic glaciers to ice-carved musical instruments.

The collection features literature that includes poetry exploring Sami cultural traditions and the effects of climate change by Vivian Faith Prescott and an essay detailing the experience of a scientific mission in Antarctica; original musical compositions by Jósep Gíslason (Iceland) and a DJ mix inspired by Langjökull, the second biggest glacier in Iceland, curated by FM Belfast drummer Ívar Pétur Kjartansson (Iceland); interviews with indie singer/songwriter and star of the AMC show “The Terror,” Nive Nielsen (Greenland) and ice musician and co-founder of the annual Ice Music Festival, Terje Isungset (Norway); as well as interviews with artist residency programs in the Arctic Circle and Antarctica.

Moby to Be Honored at Adopt the Arts

ADOPT THE ARTS TO HONOR MOBY WITH THE SOUND AND VISION AWARD AT 7TH ANNUAL BENEFIT GALA ON MARCH 7, 2019

ADOPT THE ARTS HONORS: MOBY WITH SPECIAL GUESTS!

ADOPT THE ARTS is honored to announce MOBY as the 2019 recipient of the ADOPT THE ARTS SOUND AND VISION AWARD for his contribution to the music and arts industry throughout his lifetime. The musician, artist, activist and author has impacted music lovers for decades, selling more than 20 million of his own records worldwide and playing more than 3,000 concerts throughout his career, wowing fans with his musical genius. MOBY will officially be honored at this year’s benefit gala, ADOPT THE ARTS HONORS: MOBY WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, on March 7, 2019, at THE WILTERN in Los Angeles, with the VIP after-party to be held at THE LINE HOTEL with special guest DJ Shepard Fairey.

The Los Angeles-based charity, ADOPT THE ARTS, co-founded by Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame Inductee and Grammy Award-winning musician MATT SORUM (Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver), activist ABBY BERMAN and founding board member, Golden Globe® Award and Emmy Award-winning actor JANE LYNCH, hosts the annual gala to raise funds to support their mission of preserving arts programs in U.S. public elementary schools. Additional live performances and special guests appearing at the annual gala will be announced in the coming weeks.

“Matt and I have felt that for the long-term sustainability of Adopt the Arts, we needed to broaden our base,” explains ADOPT THE ARTS co-founder Abby Berman. “By moving in another direction musically, we feel that we can appeal to a new audience. Moby seemed like a great first step in that direction for many reasons, including the fact that his music resonates with a broad and wide range of people, he has collaborated with many of the top names in the industry, and he has been using his voice for good for years for many philanthropic causes. I couldn’t think of a more deserving artist to be honored this year.”

ADOPT THE ARTS Chair and Co-founder Matt Sorum adds, “With more than two decades of an incredible music catalog and his journey selling over 20 million records worldwide, Moby has gained International acclaim. Along with his activism for Global Warming and Animal Rights, among other causes he stands for, Moby also advocates Music Therapy as a healer. He continues to lead in music and art, but his vision and voice for a better planet is what helped with our decision at Adopt the Arts to honor him at our event this year.”

Ticket prices for the ADOPT THE ARTS event are below and all donations are tax deductible:

VIP LEVEL 1 – $7,500/TABLE – UP TO 10 GUESTS

·        One Front & Center VIP Table with access for up to 10 guests

·        Pre-show Artist Meet & Greet

·        Private parking lot with complimentary valet

·        Private underground entry with direct access to exclusive VIP Lounge/Cocktail Party

·        Access to dedicated VIP expedited check-in entry line

·        Autographed limited edition concert poster by Shepard Fairey (1 per guest)

·        Tickets to private After-Party at Line Hotel for up to 10 guests (w/guest DJ Shepard Fairey)

·        Premium hosted bar throughout the night

·        Premium hosted food service (THIS IS A VEGAN EVENT)

·        Dedicated cocktail service during event

·        (2) bottles Premium Champagne per table

·        Commemorative VIP Laminate

VIP Level 2 – $5,000/Table – Up to 10 Guests

·        One Premium Center VIP Table with access for up to 10 guests

·        Complimentary parking in adjacent lot

·        Access to dedicated VIP expedited check-in entry line

·        Access to exclusive VIP Lounge/Cocktail Party

·        Autographed limited edition concert poster by Shepard Fairey (1 per guest)

·        Tickets to private After-Party at Line Hotel for up to 10 guests (w/guest DJ Shepard Fairey)

·        Premium hosted bar during event

·        Premium hosted food service (THIS IS A VEGAN EVENT)

·        Dedicated cocktail service during event

·        Commemorative VIP Laminate

VIP Level 3 – $350/Guest

·        See the show from some of the best seats in the house!

·        Complimentary parking in adjacent lot

·        Access to dedicated VIP expedited check-in entry line

·        Pre-show complimentary Cocktail Party

·        Complimentary hosted bar during event

·        Complimentary hosted food service (THIS IS A VEGAN EVENT)

·        Ticket to private After-Party at Line Hotel (w/guest DJ Shepard Fairey)

·        Commemorative VIP Laminate

VIP Level 4 – $250/Guest

·        Complimentary parking in adjacent lot

·        Access to dedicated VIP expedited check-in entry line

·        Pre-show complimentary Cocktail Party

·        Complimentary hosted bar during event

·        Complimentary hosted food service (THIS IS A VEGAN EVENT)

·        Commemorative VIP Laminate

GA/Balcony Tickets

·        $89 Balcony Front/Loge

·        $59 Balcony Upper/Mezzanine

Tickets are on sale now and can be purchased here.

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ABOUT ADOPT THE ARTS

In collaboration with well-known artists, entrepreneurs, policy makers and the general public, Adopt the Arts is dedicated to improving the academic performance of every child through the gift of making music and art. ATA is focused on developing strategic relationships with educators, administrators and board members to ensure that most underserved schools in the district are identified and ultimately, helped. Co-founders Abby Berman and Matt Sorum believe that it is morally and ethically incumbent upon the public-at-large to foster the creativity, hopes, dreams and imaginations of our children. To date, ATA has donated more than 1000 instruments to 30 LAUSD schools and fully funded the music program at Rosewood Avenue and Westminster Elementary. Each school has been “adopted” by a celebrity or public figure, exposing children to inspirational people who have worked hard for their successes. The interaction between the children and adoptee creates a sense of responsibility and shared commitment for all of those involved.

 

ABOUT MOBY

Moby was one of the most important dance music figures of the early ’90s, helping to bring the music to a mainstream audience both in England and in America. Moby fused rapid disco beats with heavy distorted guitars, punk rhythms and detailed productions that drew equally from pop, dance and movie soundtracks. His music differed from both the cool surface textures of ambient music and the hedonistic world of house music. He remained one of the most recognizable figures within techno.

Born Richard Melville Hall, Moby received his nickname as a child, derived from the fact that Herman Melville, the author of Moby Dick, is his great-great-grand uncle. Moby has been making music since he was 9 years old. He started out playing classical guitar and then went on to play with seminal Connecticut hardcore punk group the Vatican Commandoes when he was 13. He started DJ’ing after leaving college and was a fixture in the late 80’s New York house and hip-hop scenes. 

He released his first single, “Go” in 1991 (listed as one of Rolling Stones’ best records of all time), and has been making albums ever since. His own records have sold more than 20,000,000 copies worldwide, and he has also produced and remixed scores of other artists, including David Bowie, Metallica, The Beastie Boys, Public Enemy, among others. 

He has toured tirelessly, playing well over 3,000 concerts in his career, and has also had his music used in hundreds of different films, including “Heat,” “Any Given Sunday,” “Tomorrow Never Dies” and “The Beach,” among others. 

Moby works closely with a variety of different charities, including The Humane Society and The Institute for Music and Neurologic Function, and in 2007 he launched Mobygratis, which provides free music for independent film makers. Moby is known for his strong political and religious views and for his animal rights activism.

On March 7, 2019, Adopt the Arts Foundation is honored to welcome Moby as our 2019 ATA Honoree for his contribution to the music and arts industry throughout his lifetime. This will be an amazing night with live performances and special guests.

ABOUT SHEPARD FAIREY

In 1989, while at Rhode Island School of Design studying for his Bachelor of Fine Art in Illustration (which he earned in 1992), Shepard Fairey created the “Andre the Giant has a Posse” sticker that later evolved into the OBEY GIANT art campaign. In 2008, his portrait of then-Democratic candidate Barack Obama became an internationally recognized emblem of hope. Since then, Fairey has painted nearly 100 public murals, become one of the most sought- after and provocative artists in the world, and changed the way people converse about art and view the urban landscape.