Posts tagged with "cancer"

10 Ways to Monitor Your Drinking this Cinco de Mayo

1. Don’t drink on an empty stomach. Savor your meal before you start drinking an alcoholic beverage.

2. Do not overeat and Sip your drink. Enjoy your beverage.

3. Avoid binging. The definition of binging is 5 drinks or more in less than 4-5 hours.

4. Keep your consumption of drinks as low as possible – not more than 3 drinks for a man and 2 for a woman.

5. Alcoholic beverages are similar in alcohol content. One beer is equivalent to a glass of wine or a shot of liquor.

6. Find a driver. Don’t drive after drinking. It is hard to judge your blood alcohol level and its effects on your cognitive ability and reflexes.

7. If you are a diabetic or hypertensive, suffering from a heart or liver condition, take your daily medications, and check with your doctor to avoid alcohol interactions with your medications.

8. If you are going to use Tylenol, don’t exceed more than 3 grams in one day. Be aware that a lot of headache medicines or pain killers contain acetaminophen (Tylenol), so avoid accidental overdosing.

9. Don’t mix alcohol with other recreational drugs.

10. Space your beverages to allow your body the ability to metabolize what you ingested and avoid intoxication.

Savor, Sip and Space

Curated by Dr. Tarek Hassanein of Southern California Liver Centers

CBD For Dogs

Calming, pain relieving and inflammation reducer. These are only a few of the wonders CBD oil can have over your pet friend. It’s an ailment helper––without the psychoactive reactions associated with cannabis.

Cookie, an eight-year-old Schnautzer suffered from a stroke during the 2018 Holidays. The result was a poor equilibrium and a problematic internal sleeping clock. She would wake up at 2 AM, would bark for attention and wouldn’t want to go back to sleep. Times got harder in between every night, and the days seemed to get longer. Eventually, CBD was incorporated. It helped Cookie relax to the point where her sleeping schedule slowly turned to normal.

Cookie was everything her owners wanted in a dog. “She was playful and very smart. She would never sit still, and would always jump around the house. But that changed after the stroke. We couldn’t believe it.” Things quickly changed after the CBD intake, and the owners are coming back for more. “Think of it as a super-food for your dog!”

A Veterinarian’s Point of View

We went out on a search for vets and their opinions on CBD. We had the opportunity of speaking with Dr. Gary Ritcher, who is a leading Veterinary Health Expert with Rover.

“My education about CBD and medical cannabis, in general, comes from personal research and speaking with experts in the field.

I have performed a great deal of topic-related research. There is an entire chapter in my book – The Ultimate Pet Health Guide – on cannabis and I have written multiple continuing education courses for veterinarians on the topic.”

Scientific experts give us a supportive back-up feeling on CBD, and it only reassures the healing properties behind it. Before considering buying any kind of CBD treatment it’s recommendable to follow on these tips:

● Always consult your vet before trying CBD products on your dog. They can help you choose specifics and the right dosage for your pup.

● Make sure it’s hemp-derived CBD and it’s Certificate of Analysis, which basically shows the amount of CBD the product contains along with lab results.

● Always follow your dogs’ behavior after consumption, and gradually start on his dosage. That way you can really tell how well is working and monitor their reaction.

Science Behind CBD for Dogs

First thing is first, all mammals have an endocannabinoid system, but especially with the CB1 receptors, which are found primarily in the central nervous system and in the brain. The “high” or psychoactive experience associated with recreational or medical marijuana is caused by activating CB1 receptors.

It is important to never confuse CBD (cannabidiol) and THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Although derived from the same plant CBD has no psychoactive. The infamous THC will get you high and create the euphoric feeling most people recognize when they think about cannabis. CBD, on the other hand, will not cause any of these loopy feelings, instead, it takes over the body with multiple healing and preventive properties.

Dogs are benefiting from CBD in so many ways. With no known side effects, preventive measures and healing properties it makes it the perfect supplement to have at home when things start looking fishy. Here is a list of how the ways CBD can help your furry baby:

Epilepsy and seizures

It is a great nervous system booster. Helps relief recurrent seizure and stabilize dogs post-seizures.

Pain reliever

Reliefs pain and reduces inflammation that could eventually develop into diseases.

Bowel disease helper

Can normalize motility in pups with bowel diseases.

Cancer preventer and killer

Cannabinoids have shown to have antitumor cell activity in animal cancer models. This is a great way of reducing cancer cell spread and can be taken as a preventive cancerous measure.

Anxiety reducer

Aids with separation anxiety, and soothes stress especially when dogs are let alone for a prolonged time, new people visit homes or for long travels (in cars or flights).

Appetite increaser

Endocannabinoid plays a role in regulating the body’s feeding behavior.

Arthritis, joint and mobility issues

Can help increase activity and comfort in dogs

Where Can I Find It?

The past misconceptions over cannabis are slowly fading and new thoughts on their curative properties are arising. New market opportunities are opening doors to CBD distributors which reflects the future of the cannabis industry. Sooner than later you will be able to find different products on CBD, especially because it is now legal in the US as long as it follows regulations.

There are many online stores that offer CBD for dogs, including varied products like tinctures, treats and even infused with coconut oil.

CBD oil is the perfect option for all those dog lovers out there, who are looking for a different angle on dog treatments with the ultimate goal of bettering their lives. It is an alternative to conventional drugs, without the side effects and, for us humans the best part is that’s under budget. We all love our pups and we are willing to do so much for them. From creating safe spaces, playing with them and offering the best accessible options to optimize their health. There is no wonder why we call them humanity’s best friend.

Written by Hermes Maldonado

Esophageal Cancer Awareness

April is Esophageal Cancer Awareness month. According to the American Cancer Society, the 5 year survival rate (all stages combined) is 19%. As the seventh most common cancer amongst men, it is estimated that over 16,000 deaths will occur from it in 2019. Men are 3-4 more times likely to develop esophageal cancer than women.

 Ron Coury’s story offers an uplifting and inspiring survival story in time for  Esophageal Cancer Awareness.

In November 2005, I went to Santa Barbara for my annual physical with Dr. James Murray, a practice I’d begun 20 years earlier. I was in great shape, weighing in at 185 pounds at 53 years of age. I regularly ran three to five miles around the lake adjacent to my house in Las Vegas, and enjoyed full workouts and lifting weights. Still, my dad had fought cancer for more than two decades, eventually losing his battle in 2002. Deep inside, I always felt cancer would find me.

As usual, my physical began with an hour-long meeting with Dr. Murray. During our conversation, I mentioned one small oddity.

“When I eat or drink, it seems like I have to clear my throat for the first hour or two. Does that mean anything?”

“Let’s find out.”

Among a battery of tests, he ordered a barium swallow. When I was done, I headed back to Dr. Murray’s office expecting to get another glowing report. However, this time there was a glitch.

The radiologist noted that during my swallow test, it appeared that the barium passed over a small bump at the base of my esophagus. Probably just a food fragment stuck to the wall, but the doctor ordered a procedure to play safe. Unfortunately, it revealed a tumor. And a malignant one at that.

It was hard to accept, because other than the need to clear my throat, I felt fine. Hell, I felt invincible! Still, I answered with a voice so calm it surprised me. “Okay, we’re going to war. What do we do now?”

Dr. Murray recommended a surgeon at USC Medical Center in Los Angeles, Dr. Tom Demeester, who specialized in esophageal cancer. He explained that even if I qualified for surgery, only eight percent of people diagnosed with esophageal cancer survive it.

When the doctor stepped out of his office, I looked out the window and said, “Well, Dad, I guess I’ll be seeing you soon.”

Luckily, the tumor was caught early in its development. And I was an excellent candidate for surgery, an ordeal that could take up to 12 hours.

The bad news? This type of tumor was highly invasive. The surgeon would have to remove a perimeter around the tumor, as well as nearby lymph nodes and upper stomach, take out the majority of my esophagus, then connect what was left between my throat and stomach.

He explained that life would change for me in major ways. I could never lie flat again, because without an esophagus, whatever was in my stomach could come up my windpipe and choke me. Also, I could only eat small meals from that point on.

I returned home and got my affairs in order, pre planning my funeral if the surgery didn’t go well. The last thing I wanted was to put my wife and kids through this. One of the hardest parts was calling my friends and telling them, “There’s a pretty good chance I won’t survive. So, I just want to say, I feel like I had a great run and I love you.”

Finally, the moment of truth arrived: December 5, 2005. My friend and workout partner, Mark Beckerle, had driven to the hospital the day before to see me. A spiritual type, Mark said he believed that people undergoing surgery see a bright white light. If they walk to it, they die on the table. “Buddy,” he said, “if you see a white light, run the other way!”

During my surgery, I did see just such a light. As if watching the doctors and nurses from above the operating table, I saw myself facing the light. Remembering Mark’s words, I turned and did, in fact, run. Was it real or a dream? Did it happen when I was bleeding out from my spleen, which got pierced during the operation? I’ll never know.

My next conscious thought came when I woke up in post-op. The first night was brutal and the pain was really rough, but I was alive!

Things turned bad quickly. I was in ICU for several days after developing the dreaded staph infection, MRSA. Next came blood clots in both of my legs. And a collapsed lung. Finally, they moved me into a regular hospital room where I remained for a month.

By the time I was cleared to return home in January, I still had a drain in my side, and a feeding tube remained in place.

Over the course of 2006, I gradually grew stronger and I was finally allowed to start eating small amounts of solid food. As I’d been warned, the pain was through the roof. But I was thankful to resume a reasonable facsimile of normal life.

Since the surgery, I undergo a PET scan each year, which is the best cancer-screening test available. Between scans, every ache or pain would make me think, “Uh-oh, is that a tumor?” Thankfully, year after year the reports have come back, “NO CANCER!”

After the fifth PET scan, Dr. Demeester declared me cancer-free. I’ll never forget him for the life-saving surgery he performed. Nor will I ever be able to adequately thank Dr. Murray for discovering the tumor so early.

I lost over 40 pounds during my month-long hospital stay, along with a great deal of muscle mass. A few years later, I’d gained back 15 pounds, but I was maxed out. These days, I can’t eat enough to exceed the calories I burn through ordinary activity.

Ultimately, tenacity and stamina carried me through my toughest battle. As I learned more about esophageal cancer, I found out that approximately 13,500 Americans contract it annually and 12,500 are dead within a year. I’m certain that my excellent physical condition enabled me to beat the odds, not to mention the best medical team on the planet, and the love and support of family and friends.

And remember, regular physicals and early detection really do save lives.  

About Ron Coury

Ron Coury is the author of Tenacity: A Vegas Businessman Survives Brooklyn, the Marines, Corruption and Cancer to Achieve the American Dream: A True Story.

Hormone Disruptors

The 5 Biggest Disruptors Wreaking Havoc On Your Hormones

As 2019 dawns, some people are taking a “new year-new you” approach. They’re determined to make self-improvements that provide a fresh, positive outlook and strong sense of well-being.

But sometimes health factors undermine those good intentions, such as depression and its link to hormone imbalances. There are myriad ways both men and women suffer adverse effects to their hormones, says Don Colbert, M.D., and many of them are avoidable.

“We are exposed to thousands of toxic chemicals on a regular basis in the air, water and food,” says Colbert, author of Dr. Colbert’s Hormone Health Zone. “Some of them are hormone disruptors because they disturb your endocrine system, wreaking havoc and creating hormonal imbalances.

“Not only are the effects of all these disruptors depressing to think about; they actually cause depression, along with countless other ailments such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and more. But the basic principle is this: decreasing the number of disruptions will improve your health.”

Dr. Colbert breaks down the top hormone disruptors affecting men and women along with ways to minimize the disruption or stop it:

Lifestyle choices. “Whether it’s weight gain and a lack of exercise, anger and unforgiveness, drinking too much alcohol or some other thing that can be controlled, your hormone levels drop and you begin a slow slide to poorer health,” Dr. Colbert says. “Make better choices, and that dramatically decreases the chances of having any hormone deficiency symptoms.”

Medications. Medications affect the body’s cells, and sometimes side effects manifest in major problems. For example, Dr. Colbert cites Mayo Clinic research showing a prescription statin drug that lowered cholesterol could result in liver damage, memory loss or type 2 diabetes. “I estimate that 55 percent of the entire US population is taking pills that directly and negatively affect hormone levels,” Dr. Colbert says. “Get off these harmful medications you hate.”

Things you touch. Chemicals entering the body through the skin can cause long-term damage. Dr. Colbert notes phthalates, disruptors found in household cleaners, cosmetics, toys and numerous other products. “Phthalates negatively affect both men’s and women’s ability to use the testosterone that is in our bodies,” Dr. Colbert says. “Another is BPA (bisphenol A), found on the inside of metal-canned foods and plastic food-storing containers. Specifically, BPA has been found to cause or contribute to cancer, fertility problems, developmental issues and heart disease. I recommend buying glass jars of food and storing in ceramic containers.”

Diet deficiencies. “The standard American diet is usually low in key nutrients that support a healthy thyroid,” Dr. Colbert says. “Many patients with hormone imbalances have low iodine. The best solution is eat more vegetables, ideally raw or steamed.”

Aging. Dr. Colbert says estrogen levels for women begin to decline around the age of 50; for men, testosterone levels can drop low around age 45-50. “Aging is a natural combatant as a hormone disruptor,” he says, “but we can slow the acceleration of the effects of aging by optimizing our hormones. Healthy habits can make a huge difference.”

“Symptoms of serious problems indicated by hormonal imbalance can be reversed by those who focus on health in their diet, lifestyle and living environment,” Dr. Colbert says. “Then they can enable all of their systems to function optimally.”

About Don Colbert, M.D.
Don Colbert, M.D., is the author of Dr. Colbert’s Hormone Health Zone. He has been a board-certified family practice doctor for more than 25 years and has offices in Orlando, Fla., and Dallas. The author of over 40 books, he wrote two New York Times best-sellers – The Seven Pillars of Health and Dr. Colbert’s “I Can Do This” Diet – has sold more than 10 million books and treated 50,000-plus patients. Dr. Colbert is a frequent show guest of Christian leaders Joyce Meyer, John Hagee, and Kenneth Copeland and has been featured on The Dr. Oz Show, Fox News, ABC World News Tonight, and in periodicals such as Newsweek and Reader’s Digest.

Rise in Obesity-Related Cancers

A new analysis, published in the Lancet Public Health, raises the alarm that the rates of obesity-related cancers are rising in younger and younger adults. In the new study, six of twelve types of obesity-related cancers have significantly increased between 1995-2014 and the risk of these cancers is increasing in each successive younger age group. These cancers include colorectal, pancreatic, gallbladder, kidney cancer and multiple myeloma (a type of blood cancer). These cancer types are particularly concerning because they are very serious and account for over 150,000 deaths in the U.S. every year.

“These numbers are worrying but not surprising; the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) recently sounded the alarm that having overweight and obesity cause at least 12 types of cancer. However, the younger and younger age bracket in which we see rates increasing is even more troubling and demands a response. We cannot just watch these rates go up and ignore the factors that we know are contributing to these increases,” says Dr. Nigel Brockton, Vice President of Research at AICR.

Disturbingly, over 70% of Americans have overweight or obesity according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And AICR maintains that cancer risk increases across each higher category of Body Mass Index (BMI) as an indicator of body fatness (Healthy = 18.5-24.9, Overweight = 25-29.9, and Obesity = 30 and above).

A mere five BMI points (kg/m2) separate the three basic (healthy, overweight, obese) BMI categories. It is important to emphasize that cancer risk is not limited to the extreme category of obesity only, the risk increases for those with overweight too. For example, compared to those having healthy BMI range overweight category face an increased liver cancer risk of 30% and those having obesity of 60%.

The recent AICR Energy Balance and Body Fatness Report presented strong evidence for factors that can reduce risk of having weight gain, overweight and obesity, including walking, aerobic physical activity, food containing fiber and a “Mediterranean-type” diets rich in fruits and vegetables that reduce the risk of weight gain, overweight and obesity. Conversely, sugar-sweetened drinks, fast foods and a “Western type” diet rich in meats and energy-dense proteins are strongly linked to increased weight gain, overweight and obesity.

The Report also points to the evidence that greater screen time is a cause of weight gain, overweight and obesity in children. This is particularly relevant in light of the Lancet study that discussed the onset of cancer at an early age, since children with overweight and obesity are likely to turn into young adults in a similar status. There is enormous opportunity to prevent future cancer cases, if changes can be made to stop and reverse the current trend of increasing overweight and obesity. In addition to helping individuals learn about healthy lifestyle choices, community and national policies play a crucial role in creating living spaces more conducive to physical activity and healthier food choices.

AICR is urging Congress and federal agencies to improve funding for cancer prevention research, ensure that federal nutrition and physical activity guidelines reflect the latest research regarding cancer risk, improve nutrition labeling and improve access to lifestyle interventions.

Cure for Cancer in Israel

Cancer Researchers in Israel Believe They Will Have A Cure For Cancer In 1 Year

Promising Research with Multi-Agent Toxins

According to the WHO/International Agency for Research on Cancer, 18.1 million cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. Cancer is now the second leading cause of death behind cardiovascular diseases. It is imperative now, more than ever, that we continue to seek new methods to treat this devastating illness.

Recently, Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies did an interview where stated they believe that they will “offer in a year’s time a complete cure for cancer”. Although it grabs headlines, that is a momentous statement to make. Let’s dig a little deeper into the work that they are currently doing. The premise behind their treatment involves using a multi-agent target toxin treatment to treat cancer. In the past, this type of therapy targeted toxin treatment has involved the introduction of DNA coding for a protein (can be an antibody) into a bacteriophage – which is a virus that infects bacteria. These proteins can then be displayed on the surface of the virus and interact with its surroundings.
The company’s therapy involves a similar phenomenon, but with the use of peptides instead of proteins. Peptides consist of two or more amino acids linked together in a chain. They are smaller than proteins, can serve biological functions, and in many ways are less expensive to reproduce.

Most cancer therapies aim at attacking a target in a cell, on the surface of a particular cell, or in one of its internal pathways.

However, a mutation in one of these targets can make the therapy ineffective. What is being done here, with multi-target toxin therapy, is that several peptides of the cancer cell are being targeted with a peptide toxin to avoid mutations rendering a therapy ineffective. The more targets used, the less likely that a series of mutations will occur simultaneously that will make the therapy ineffective. This will help in not allowing the cancer cell to evade the treatment and continue to replicate, even with some mutations occurring.

This may have the ability to reduce side effects as well, given that the peptides will aim to attack specific targets on the cancer cells that are typically not overexpressed in other healthy cells. In addition, since the peptides are small (the ones they have developed are about 12 amino acids long) and lack a rigid structure, it allows them access to regions of the cell that may be blocked if a larger protein was used.

Overall, they are using a “combination modality” in a very specific manner for an attack of each cancer cell in this therapy. Combinational therapy has been successful before with cancer, HIV, and autoimmune disease among others. The goal of the company is to eventually personalize this to each patient by having a biopsy sent and analyzed for the receptors that it over expresses. The patient would then be administered an individualized concoction developed to treat the disease.

This is exciting and has potential, but more data needs to be presented. Thus far they have concluded mice experimentation and found inhibited human cancer cell growth that did not affect healthy mice cells. They are currently working on beginning a round of clinical trials, which many people will be eager to see the conclusions. Recently, Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies has been writing patents on a variety of different specific peptides. While their work thus far is enthusing and making headlines, their claim to “offer in a year’s time a complete cure for cancer” is likely premature. Yet, I don’t know a single person, including myself, who wouldn’t hope for that.

Joshua Mansour, M.D. is a board-certified hematologist and oncologist in Stanford, California.  He is currently doing additional work in the field of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Immunotherapy.

Stouts N Staches, 360 Magazine

Stouts N Staches

6th Annual Venice Beach Stouts N Staches Returns to Venice on Sunday March 3rd, 2019 at Exciting New Location, Clutch Venice to Raise Awareness for Men’s Health

Brew Fest, Pig Roast, Live Music, Mustache Trims & More at Clutch on Lincoln Blvd.

Stouts N Staches is back for it’s 6th year bringing together the Venice community and local bands for a beer fest fundraiser to raise awareness for the Movember Foundation. Participants will enjoy beer from area breweries and whiskey tastings as well as a Pig Roast from Oscar Hermosillo, owner of Clutch and Venice Beach Wines. This year’s event will take place in the parking lot of Clutch Venice who will be kicking off their own Sunday Pig Roast series and supplying ticket holders with a full plate of their famous BBQ (vegetarian and vegan options will be present). Other options available for guests include wine and non-alcoholic beverages, giveaways, free mustache and beard trims, leather treatments, live music from Bob Dylan Tribute band, Jack of Hearts, cigar lounge, mustache contests and more.

A portion of proceeds from Stouts n Staches will benefit men’s health issues through The Movember Men’s Health Foundation.

Sponsors/Vendors include: Clutch Venice, MedMen, Venice Paparazzi, Dr. Scobi Kombucha, Service & Supply Barbershop and more.

WHEN:

Sunday, March 3, 2019

3-8 p.m.  

WHERE:

Clutch Venice, 427 Lincoln Blvd, Venice, CA 90291

TICKETS:

$15 in advance for GA (access to music, games, access to vendors & more)

$40 in advance for VIP (includes 2 drink tickets, pig roast, whiskey tastings, live music, beard trims and more. Beer and Wine available for purchase.

 

LINKS:

www.stountsnstaches2019.eventbrite.com 

www.stoutsnstaches.com 

www.clutch-venice.com 

ABOUT MOVEMBER FOUNDATION:

The Movember Foundation is a global charity raising funds and awareness for men’s health. These funds deliver breakthrough research and support services to allow men to live longer, healthier, happier lives. Since 2003, millions have joined the men’s health movement, raising more than $650 million and funding over 1,000 programs through impact investments, focusing on prostate cancer, testicular cancer, poor mental health and physical inactivity.  

 

Movember is fully accredited by the Better Business Bureau, and for the past three years, has been named a Top 100 best NGO by The Global Journal. For more information please visit Movember.com. Movember is a registered 501(c)(3) charity.

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@stoutsnstaches

#StoutsnStaches

#Movember

#MensHealth

MIT: Liver transplant deaths reduced by 20%

Demand for liver transplants is much higher than organ supply, resulting in approximately 2,400 deaths every year. Also problematic is the current model used to identify and prioritize the “sickest” patients, which does not allow for equitable access to all waitlisted candidates, with a particular disadvantage to women. To address these issues, MIT Sloan School of Management Prof. Dimitris Bertsimas and Prof. Nikos Trichakis utilized machine learning to create a model that reduces mortality by 20%, averting nearly 400 deaths each year. Their model, Optimized Prediction of Mortality (OPOM), also provides a fairer and more equitable allocation to candidate groups, including women.

“There are many significant benefits to using this new model over the current system. Unlike the current system, which makes some arbitrary choices and results in bias against certain populations, OPOM’s methodology for prioritization is clear and understandable to surgeons — and it can save hundreds of additional lives every year,” says Bertsimas.

Trichakis noted, “OPOM fixes many of the current system’s problems because it was designed specifically for liver patients using real data. As a result, it can accurately prioritize patients across all populations without bias. This shows the potential of machine learning technology to help guide clinical practice and national policy on transplants.”

The researchers explain that the current model created in 2002 depends on the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to rank disease severity and priority for receiving a liver transplant. As certain patient populations are at risk of death or of becoming too sick or unsuitable for transplantation based upon disease progressions that are not captured in their MELD score, the system arbitrarily grants them “exception” points. While the overall MELD score has led to a more objective ranking of candidates awaiting liver transplantation, the process of MELD exception point granting has resulted in inequitable and undesirable outcomes.

More specifically, the MELD exception points policy has disadvantaged women. “Data shows that women have historically had less access to liver transplantation and have had higher death rates on the wait list,” notes Trichakis. “This is due to the awarding of exception points to cancer patients, as more than 75% of those patients are men. Women also tend to have lower muscle mass and higher sodium levels, which lowers their MELD scores.”

Using a state-of-the-art machine learning method developed at the MIT Operations Research Center and real historical data from liver patients, the researchers sought a better way to prioritize the allocation of organs. With OPOM, they asked the question: What is the probability that a patient will either die or become unsuitable for liver transplantation within three months, given his or her individual characteristics?

They found that the OPOM allocation outperformed the MELD-based prediction method in terms of accuracy and fairness. In simulations, OPOM averted significantly more waitlist deaths and removed the bias against women. As a result, it allowed for more equitable and efficient allocation of liver transplants.

“Unlike MELD, which relies on an inexact approach of exception point assignment, OPOM allows for accurate prioritization of all candidates and removes bias for or against particular groups,” says Trichakis.

Bertsimas adds, “If we use this model to change how we measure mortality and allocate livers, the death rate will decrease by 20%, which is very significant. We’re hopeful that our findings will affect the national policy.”

Bertsimas and Trichakis are coauthors of “Development and validation of an Optimized Prediction of Mortality (OPOM) for candidates awaiting liver transplantation” with transplant surgeons Dr. Ryutaro Hirose of the University of California and Dr. Parsia A. Vagefi of the University of Southwestern Medical Center. Additional coauthors include MIT Sloan students Yuchen Wang and Jerry Kung. Their paper has appeared online in the American Journal for Transplantation.

JERRIS MADISON

Jerris Madison is a Los Angeles-based noted Fashion Photographer who is also the Publisher and Editor-In-Chief at OBVIOUS Magazine. OBVIOUS Magazine is one of the most influential magazines with a global reach of 4 million each month via social media and obviousmag.com.
Among his clients are Kevin Hart, Essence Magazine and Eva Marcille. Jerris’ most recent work was featured on the Dianne Reeves 2015 Grammy win for Best Jazz Vocals Album.

A Detroit native, Jerris finds his stability through family and friends. Noted for always “living his best life”, this perspective was put to the test in November of 2014 when Jerris lost his right leg to Chondrosarcoma Bone Cancer.

Not one to be slowed down, Jerris views himself as a survivor and continues to play varying roles such as Image Consultant, Social Media Expert, Film/TV Wardrobe Stylist, Motivational Speaker, as well as Photographer. He hopes that his story and experience will lead him to become an author, global philanthropist, potential talk show host, and even docuseries that focuses on his life and the stories of other amputees around the world.

Editor. Fashion Chief. Photographer. Survivor! Jerris Madison, you deserve this ovation!

Jerris mogul, 360 MAGAZINE, obvious MAGAZINE

Dragonfly x Merck

Dragonfly Therapeutics, Inc. (“Dragonfly”), today announced a strategic collaboration with Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, through a subsidiary, to discover, develop and commercialize innovative immunotherapies for patients with solid tumor cancers. The collaboration grants Merck the option to license exclusive worldwide intellectual property rights to products developed using Dragonfly’s TriNKET™ technology platform for a number of solid-tumor programs, with the potential to earn Dragonfly up to $695 million in up front and milestone payments per program as well as royalties on sales of approved products.

“Merck is a world leader in solid-tumor cancer therapies and has a demonstrated history of delivering breakthrough treatment options for patients,” said Bill Haney, co-founder and CEO of Dragonfly Therapeutics. “We’re excited to work with Merck to accelerate bringing drug candidates developed using our innovative TriNKET™ technology platform to patients with a number of solid tumor malignancies.”

“Dragonfly’s technology platform offers an opportunity to harness the power of NK cell receptor engagement to develop novel therapeutics targeting solid tumor indications,” said Dr. Joe Miletich, Senior Vice President Discovery and Preclinical Development, Merck Research Laboratories. “We look forward to working with the Dragonfly team.”