Posts tagged with "Britian"

Int’l Model + Influencer Angelina Galt

Q: How difficult was it to get signed to a major agency?

A: In some ways it was difficult and, in some ways, not. When I was starting my carrier and nobody has heard my name, it was difficult to get in the loop. But having worked really hard and built up a large portfolio I was able to sign with my first agency. After that first agency, other agencies have opened up doors to me. It all depends on the amount of work that you are willing you put in.

Q: Have you always had a mother agent? If so, what are the advantages of having one?

A: I didn’t always have a mother agency, but I am now signed to one on a short contract. Having a mother agent is very helpful in the beginning as it can connect you to agencies around the world. They are like the middleman.

Q: Where did you inherit your innate style?

A: I have always experimented with style from a young age. I went through almost every “phase” of dressing up that you can imagine and, in the end, found my sweet spot. My current style is a mix of everything I have tried and truly reflects my inner self. Style isn’t money and it can’t be bought with it.

Q: What was it like growing up in your hometown? Do you ever visit and do they recognize you?

A: I never quite got to grow up in my hometown. I was born in Russia then moved to Thailand at the age of 2. Thailand is a beautiful and unique place that has thought me things I would have never learned elsewhere. Sadly, I have not gotten a chance to Visit since we left to come to America. I hope to go back for a trip in the near future.

Q: How did you book your first cover? Through agency or publicist?

A: Neither, I booked my first cover through my manager. While we were building up my portfolio, a magazine reached out to us asking to have a shoot and interview, to which of course I said yes!

Q: What’s next for you?

A: I plan to sign with multiple agencies around the world. I also am currently working on my Angelina Galt foundation, that helps talented children reach their goals.

Q: Any community service involvement?

A: The Angelina Galt Foundation is a non-profit organization made only to raise money for children. While doing community service is a great way of giving back to the world, I wanted to start my own foundation.

Q: What words of advice would offer aspiring talent and models?

A: First of all, believe in yourself. Seriously. No matter what anybody says and no matter how many times you think you have failed. Keep fighting for it and it will be yours. Enjoy yourself at all times and be the best that you can. Don’t pretend to be anyone else to get noticed because you want people to fall in love with you. If you become your authentic self, people will be drawn to that kind of energy.

 

Angelina’s bio:

Angelina was born in Nokhodka, a port city in the Russian Far East. In her lifetime, she traveled a lot and even lived in different parts of the world. At the age of 1, Angelina moved with her parents to Thailand, where she studied two languages; English & Thai. Ever since she was a small girl, she has absorbed the culture and manners of high society from the nanny who used to work in the Royal family of Thailand.

Beginning at 7, Angelina studied in a British school. After moving to the US, she attended a private school that allowed her to balance school and her burgeoning modelling career. In addition to modelling, Angelina is actively involved in extracurriculars like swimming, dance, singing and horseback riding.

At 15, Angelina signed an exclusive contract with a modelling agency, while already having some major fashion bookings prior to that. As her star continues to rise, Angelina has a slew of major covers and spreads coming up. Angelina is looking forward to signing with a major agency, and developing her foundation for the arts, and announcing major projects on the horizon! For the latest updates and information, please log on to https://angelinagalt.com

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Photo credit: JEAN-BAPTISTE FORT – @jbfort_photography

Treatment of Afghan Interpreters

Approximately one month, the Director of Faith Matters, Fiyaz Mughal, highlighted the plight of Afghan Interpreter, Mohammed Nabi, and how he was sleeping rough on the streets of Athens. Nabi’s case was initially documented and he was assisted by Jess Webster, who works with refugees in Greece.

Having heard of the case, the petition by the Director of Faith Matters, has now reached over 116,000 signatories within 5 weeks. It is now being backed by the Sun on Sunday and has also been highlighted by the Daily Mail and the Metro. Yet, the Government have made no headway in addressing this issue. There is therefore a groundswell of public opinion backing Nabi’s case, yet the politicians refuse to even acknowledge this case.

Mohammed Nabi worked for ISAF and British forces in Afghanistan between 2008-2011. He has received numerous commendations for his work with British Forces such as from the 1st Battalion of the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment. He was instrumental in interpreting Taliban commands in real time when in the field with British soldiers and thereby he was key to tracking Taliban troop movements and attack points against British soldiers.

Speaking to Mughal in Athens he said that:
“My role was to work with commanding officers and I was the bridge between Afghan forces and British commanding officers. When officers from the British army went to speak to village elders, I was with them. There was an unwritten command that Taliban leaders gave to their forces to kill Afghan Interpreters first so that British and ISAF forces would be blind in the field. I was at risk of suicide bombers in such situations in villages as they tried to target British commanding officers and their interpreters”.

Nabi left working with the British armed forces after 1 year, (in 2009), because of threats from senior Afghan commanders made against his family and against him. He rejoined ISAF and British forces within 3 months of leaving since his skills were suited to armed forces work and he could not find other work and served again as an Afghan interpreter until 2011.

In 2016, an attempted kidnap against him failed and ‘night knocks’ against his front door raised threat levels against him and he fled on foot through Iran and into Turkey where he lounged for 18 months with no assistance from aid agencies who were assisting families. They were therefore not focused on assisting young single men.

Repeated attempts to highlight his case and the threat to his four children and wife failed in Turkey and he was left destitute and penniless, where he took up shepherding for basic subsistence. Each month though, saw the Taliban makes gains and come closer to his village and Nabi said that the policy of the Taliban to the children of people who assisted ISAF forces was to call them ‘sons of snakes, who were snakes themselves’. In other words, the children of Afghan interpreters were at serious of attack.

In 2016, to highlight his case he left Turkey and ended up being arrested in Greece and jailed. He was eventually released and claimed asylum though ended up penniless sleeping on a park bench in Athens where the Director of Faith Matters met up with him.

Speaking about the plight of Afghan Interpreters and in particular Nabi’s case, Fiyaz Mughal OBE, who developed the petition and who worked with the Sun on Sunday to highlight his case, said:

“Nabi has been denied entry into the UK and given no assistance when he approached UK Government agencies. How can this be right when he saw Afghan colleagues die in battle and Nabi was there saving British lives by interpreting Taliban commands whilst rounds went over his head. The only possessions he has are the plastic-coated commendations from officers because of his work in the field. It is disgusting the way that this man has been treated.

“The treatment of Afghan interpreters is a national disgrace and what the petition and the support from national newspapers shows is that the public care, whilst politicians have shown little courage in addressing this matter. I believe that anyone who has served more than a year in Afghanistan supporting our armed forces and who can show that their lives are in danger because of their work, must be let in. We relied on them to keep our armed forces safe, and now they need our help. This national disgrace must end and I will keep speaking out”.