Posts tagged with "Ballers"

Jeff Langlois, Jaguar F Type R Dynamic, 2020, 360 MAGAZINE

Jaguar F-TYPE R-Dynamic

Written by Vaughn Lowery

Photos by Jeff Langlois

Since its inception in 2013, the Jaguar F-Type has been responsible for revolutionizing the sports car industry. With it’s obnoxious exhaust and robust styling, this has come to be one of the most sensual vehicles in the chronicle of the automobile industry.

Design

Reminiscent of an Aston Martin Vantage roadster, this vehicle is sleek and seductive. Caldera red exterior with scarlet red interior. The race-inspired seats cup your derrière with the same type of firmness which NFL players display once a teammate makes a touchdown. Everything along the dashboard is loaded and takes on a minimalist approach to decadence. Contrast stitching intertwined with ambient cabin lighting pushes the driver’s vision. You literally feel like you’re in the cockpit of a fighter jet. LED designer head and tail lamps add a touch of menace to the overall skeleton. 20″ inch wheels on this vehicle’s small frame screams Matchbox hot rod. The infamous R package is badged on the front, sides and back. The skirt, ground effects and active spoiler (which deploys at 70mph) give it an aggressive stance.

Technology

The F Type 10″ infotainment screen is bright and easy to use. With Bluetooth and navigation capabilities, permits the driver to feel even more linked up. 380 watt Meridian stereo system provides a premium sound which mimics an Arclight movie theater experience. Retractable vents on the instrument panel go flush once AC/heating is turned off. The climate control package comes with heated/cooled seats, heated steering wheel and windshield. For 2020, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and front parking sensors are now standard on this manikin.

Safety

With adequate sensors for the driver, lane departure and cruise control keep the vehicle tucked in between the lines of road every bit well as ample space away from vehicles while on extended road trips.

Performance

Behind the wheel of this enthusiast’s ride is a dream come true. The sports seats are outstanding for long distances. The 3.0L supercharged V6 AWD vehicle delivers 380hp and 339lb-ft torque. Agile, responsive and brawny are the best adjectives to describe the overall handling and Powertrain. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted. Of course, the torque vectoring and braking is on par with many of its competitors but nothing to boast about. Let’s face it, if you are seeking a rambunctious roller coaster ride, you may desire to blast out another 50,000 USD for the SVR. And, if you’re in the mood for a manual transmission, then this may not be the sleigh ride for you as it’s no longer offered on this crop.

In short, if you’re in the marketplace for a sybaritic yet sassy vixen that’s just under a 100,000 USD – then this is the car for you. Strong curb appeal, decent gas mileage (mpg: 23 city/30 highway) apace with enough amenities to keep a ‘gadget head’ feigning. The 2020 Jaguar F-Typer R-Dynamic is the benchmark for come-hither coupes, especially with all-wheel drive.

Pre-order.

Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce tops the list, featured in 11 different tunes by such artists as Future, The Weeknd, and Kodak Black. Ferrari is a close second. Chevrolet, Lamborghini, Bentley, Cadillac, Mercedes-Benz, and Porsche each get touts in several songs. Among non-car shout-outs, old standbys Hennessy cognac and Nike’s Air Jordan sneaker label got the most. We also found that it’s not just alcohol, guns, clothing, and super luxury making it into songs anymore—software, cookware, and even Band-Aids are making the grade.

As far as the song including the most name-checks, the crown goes to “Bad and Boujee” by hip-hop group Migos, which climbed all the way to the No. 1 spot on the charts early this year. It includes 19 brand mentions, from Instagram and Klout to Segway scooters and, um, Crock-Pot slow cookers. Car references are sprinkled throughout the song, too. They rap about a “lamb” and a “frog,” nods to Lamborghini and Porsche. There’s also a reference to the Ferrari 458 Spider, a drop-top convertible that costs more than a quarter-million dollars. The Rolls-Royce Ghost gets some attention as well.

The obvious question when musicians mention obscure brands is, are they getting paid? Sometimes they do. As with television shows and feature films, brands like to insert themselves into pop culture, and music is no different. Dozens of music videos show off stuff from Beats, the Jimmy Iovine/Dr. Dre headphones brand owned by Apple Inc. The item appears in several of Lady Gaga’s music videos, from her breakout hit “Just Dance” to “Poker Face” and “Telephone.” Beats Pill speakers, meanwhile, are clearly visible in videos from Britney Spears, Miley Cyrus, and Nicki Minaj.

It’s often unclear what’s a paid placement and what’s not, however, since artists generally don’t disclose the deals. No, Drake wasn’t paid by Rolls-Royce to include the Wraith in “Portland,” or its bigger and pricier cousin, the Phantom, in “Jumpman,” according to the manufacturer. But Chris Brown’s 2008 hit “Forever,” which featured the line “double your pleasure,” turned out to be an extended version of a chewing gum jingle for Wrigley’s Doublemint. 

(Photo Cred: Rebecca Smeyne —Billboard)

There’s a middle ground, however. Rolls-Royce, for example, will sometimes provide cars to be featured in music videos, said company spokesman Gerry Spahn. When someone uses the car as a shorthand for luxury, it helps the brand, he said. And besides, celebrities and musicians make up about 20 percent of the automaker’s customers, so it has the potential to be a sales strategy, too. 

The $400,000 Phantom is Rolls-Royce’s signature vehicle, but the company has attracted much hype for three other models it’s released since 2009: the Ghost, Wraith, and Dawn. All have garnered song mentions, with the Wraith topping the tally with four.
While parent company BMW AG keeps close tabs on the Rolls-Royce brand, Spahn said they’re more than happy for the exposure. Last year, Rolls-Royce had its second-highest sales numbers ever, delivering more than 4,000 cars to wealthy customers around the world. Even if the car’s desirability increased, production constraints limit the company to a maximum of 6,000 cars a year, said a person with knowledge of its operations.

(Source: BloombergPursuits)