Posts tagged with "art"

Latinidad in American Festivals

Until recently, urbane Latin music has been scarce in mainstream American music festivals. Thus, the 2019 Coachella latino lineup is a huge deal because it’s the largest and most profitable one on the planet.

In the past, only a few latin artists have performed at the prestigious venue – Cafe Tacvba and The Mars Volta. In 2010, Calle 13 was the first urbano latino artist to hit the stage. In 2018, there were a total of 11 latin artists such as Helado Negro, Ibeyi, Los Angeles Azules, Kali Uchis and Cuco. Fast forward to the present, there’s 17 latin artists slated to perform at this year’s Coachella – a total win for the culture! As we all know, this roster will and has already attracted a much more diverse audience.

As of late, J Balvin brought reggeaton and latin urbano back to the stage. His performance included reggeaton classics like “Oye Mi Canto” by N.O.R.E featuring Nina Sky and “Rakata” by Wisin y Yandel. Bad Bunny took to the stage on April 14th and returns again on the 21st to make a second iconic show. Los Tucanes de Tijuana (popular group from the late 80’s) graced the stage playing “La Chona” and other hits.

Chilean singer, Mon Laferte, has sold over a half of a million albums in Latin America and is also listed on this year’s lineup. Her career began on a singing competition show in Chile, Rojo.

In short, the amount of Latin as well as minority artists added to major festival lineups will continue to develop, namely due to Beyoncé’s Homecoming.

Marie Hagerty + Peter Vandermark

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present dual solo exhibitions featuring works by Australian artists Marie Hagerty and Peter Vandermark. The exhibitions will be opened with an introduction by Dr. Anne Summers. Hagerty’s collection, titled The Edge, comprises large acrylic and oil paintings. Her works bend the surface of the canvas by creating space where there is none and thereby superseding the canvas itself. At first glance, the viewer is transfixed by oblong configurations of reds, blues, browns, and greys that are implicated in a two-dimensional landscape of organic configured movement. Further concentration reveals plane upon plane of depth within the painting. Through a mastering of contour and shadow, Hagerty creates a multi-planar world the viewer can nearly jump into.

Peter Vandermark’s series of works on display includes 10 geometric, sculptural imaginings of humanity’s interaction with space and the built environment. This group of abstract three-dimensional works is composed of timber along with painted and mirrored acrylic. Stemming from a commentary on the modernist desire to integrate both life and art, these geometric and reflective pieces render a unique spatial experience for the viewer. For Vandermark, the relationship between the work and viewer is a private and intimate experience. Simultaneously, Vandermark’s sculptures are models of architectural landscapes; creating an abstracted and interior landscape of wanderlust. In a designed and curated modern world, Vandermark’s work analyses the evolution of humanity’s interaction with scale, dimensions and textures of inhabitation.

 

Marie Hagerty (b. 1964) is a Sydney born artist who shifted to Canberra about 30 years ago and has been working primarily as a painter. Hagerty has a very effective and curiously unusual hybrid approach, both in her techniques of painting, employing traditional oils and modern acrylic, as well as in her conceptual framework. She seamlessly combines within a non-figurative composition seemingly figurative elements realized within a high degree of verisimilitude to surfaces and textures. Above all, her paintings display a high degree of visual intelligence in their subtle play of push and pull optics across the sensuous rolling surface. In recent years her paintings have been included in curated and invitational exhibitions at the National Gallery of Victoria, the Ian Potter Museum of Art in Melbourne, the Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane and the Canberra Museum. Hagerty is represented by Olsen Gallery in Sydney and Karen Woodbury Gallery in Melbourne.

 

Peter Vandermark (b. 1960) is a Melbourne born artist interested in the evolution of humanity’s interaction with an increasingly artificial and curated world. “It is one of Vandermark’s strengths as a sculptor that he absorbs and explores the entirety of the designed three-dimensional world, rather than only having a dialogue with the past fine art sculpture. His interests are in the domestic, the urban, the architectural, the mechanical, the semiotic (signs and signage), and even the way in which spoken language can manifest as a ‘solid’ which impacts upon the world.”

APY Lands LA

CENTRAL DESERT PAINTERS OF AUSTRALIA

Invitation Only
Opening Reception May 4, 4-6pm
2685 S La Cienega Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90034
Exhibition May 3 – May 30, 2019

Olsen Gruin Gallery and the Australian Consulate-General Los Angeles are pleased to invite you to the opening of

APY LANDS LA: Central Desert Painters of Australia

An Exhibition of Indigenous Australian Art featuring paintings by 18 female and 3 male artists including Yaritji Young, Wawiriya Burton, Alec Baker, Mona Mitakiki Shepherd, Tjimpayi Presley, Betty Muffler, Naomi Kantjuriny, Maringka Tunkin, Freda Brady, Sandra Ken, Tjungkara Ken, Sylvia Kanytjupai Ken, Ken Sisters’ Collaborative, Tuppy Goodwin, Imitjala Curley, Witjiti George, Michelle Lewis, Mitakiki Men’s Collaborative, Taylor Cooper, Matjanka Norris, Manyitjanu Lennon, Yurpiya Lionel and Barbara Moore.

ABOUT APY LANDS LA

The curated show will exhibit contemporary works by a group of primarily female Aboriginal artists from the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (Translating as the People who speak Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara dialects) Lands. This area is located in remote Central Australia in the far northern tip of South Australia. The exhibit comprises painted depictions of the transcendental and its transubstantiation into the material world. These works reflect a new direction in Indigenous art that refers to an ancient mythology still pertinent and very much a part of contemporary art today.

The APY Art Centre Collective is a group of 10 Indigenous owned and governed enterprises. It is a formidable group of the most celebrated and ambitious Indigenous art studios in Australia – all exploring a diverse range of mediums, to express and share their Tjukurpa (Dreaming Stories), which have been passed down from their ancestors.

For the Indigenous peoples of Australia, Dreamtime functions as a way to remember the past, understand the present, and interpret the future. “Australian Aboriginal art was the last great movement of the 20th century, that began 60,000 years earlier,” said the late Robert Hughes. The artists featured in APY LANDS LA: Central Desert Painters of Australia, strive to communicate this metaphysical and spiritual world-view by illustrating the remarkable stories of Dreamtime.

APY LANDS: Central Desert Painters of Australia will be on view from
May 3 – May 30, 2019
Tuesday – Saturday
10am – 5pm

For further information please contact the gallery at info@olsengruin.com or +1.646.525.6213.

Homecoming

Today, Netflix released Homecoming: A Film by Beyoncé, which presents an intimate look at her historic 2018 Coachella performance that paid homage to America’s historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Interspersed with candid footage and interviews detailing the preparation and powerful intent behind her vision, Homecoming gives a peek into the process and emotional physical sacrifices it took to conceptualize and execute a performance of that magnitude that became a cultural movement. This stand-alone Netflix original is now available globally on Netflix.

As the first black woman to headline Coachella, Homecoming recognizes the African American visionaries who inspired Beyoncé, including HBCU alums Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, activist Marian Wright Edelman, and scholar W.E.B. Du Bois, in addition to cultural luminaries such as Nina Simone, Maya Angelou, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Audre Lorde. Beyoncé’s personal knowledge of the relevance and celebration of HBCUs started with her father, Mathew Knowles, an alumnus of Fisk University.

Shot over eight months, the film follows the global entertainer as she returns to the stage after the birth of her twins, highlighting the comprehensive preparation involved in creating her groundbreaking performance, which included four months of band rehearsals followed by four months of dance rehearsals with over 150 musicians, dancers, and other creatives, — all of whom were hand-picked by the artist herself.

In juggling dual roles as both the director of her live performance and the film that captured the process of making it, Beyoncé says, “It was one of the hardest jobs I have taken on but I knew that I had to push myself and my team to go beyond great to legendary. We knew nothing like this was ever done on a festival level before and it needed to be iconic beyond compare. The performance was an homage to an important part of African American culture. It had to be true to those who know and entertaining and enlightening to those who needed to learn. In making the film and re-telling the story, the purpose remained the same.”

Many in the cast; band, singers, dancers and steppers are former HBCU students, immersed in the HBCU marching band tradition. They joined Beyoncé’s own group of performers, some who have toured with her for years. Viewers not only get to see the intense dance rehearsals and talent of these amazing artists, but hear their personal journey from HBCU student to artist and the lifelong impact that comes with performing alongside Beyoncé in this historic concert.

“So many people who are culturally aware and intellectually sound are graduates from historically black colleges and universities, including my father,” she says in the film. “There is something incredibly important about the HBCU experience that must be celebrated and protected.”

As a treat to her fans, the film also includes, in the end credits, her remake of “Before I Let Go” by Frankie Beverly and Maze, a 1981 R&B classic that’s commonly performed at HBCU games. The single will be available on the film’s soundtrack, Homecoming: The Live Album, available today from Parkwood Entertainment and Columbia Records. smarturl.it/BH9102

Homecoming: A Film by Beyoncé was directed and produced by Beyoncé Knowles-Carter. Longtime collaborator Ed Burke served as co-director. Steve Pamon and Erinn Williams are executive producers.

Set List

“Crazy In Love”

“Freedom”

“Lift Ev’ry Voice And Sing”

“Formation”

“Sorry”/”Me, Myself and I”

“Kitty Kat”

“Bow Down”

“I Been On”

“Drunk In Love”

“Diva”

“Flawless” (Remix)

“Feeling Myself”

“Top Off”

“7/11”

“Don’t Hurt Yourself”

“I Care”

“Partition”

“Yoncé”

“Mi Gente (Remix)”

“Mine”

“Baby Boy”

“You Don’t Love Me (No, No, No)”

“Hold Up”

“Countdown”

“Check On It”

“Déjà Vu”(featuring JAY-Z)

“Run the World (Girls)”

“Lose My Breath” (featuring Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams)

“Say My Name” (featuring Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams)

“Soldier” (featuring Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams)

“Get Me Bodied” (With Solange Knowles dancing)

“Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)”

“Love On Top”

About Netflix

Netflix is the world’s leading internet entertainment service with over 148 million paid memberships in over 190 countries enjoying TV series, documentaries and feature films across a wide variety of genres and languages. Members can watch as much as they want, anytime, anywhere, on any internet-connected screen. Members can play, pause and resume watching, all without commercials or commitments.

About Parkwood Entertainment

Parkwood Entertainment is an entertainment and management company founded by entertainer and entrepreneur, Beyoncé in 2010. With headquarters in New York City the company houses departments in music and video production, management, marketing, digital, creative, philanthropy, fashion, publicity and a record label. Under its original name, Parkwood Pictures, in 2008, the company released the film Cadillac Records (2008), in which Beyoncé starred and co-produced. The company also released the film, Obsessed (2009), with Beyoncé as star and executive producer. Parkwood Entertainment produced The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour (2013-2014) and The Formation World Tour (2016), and co-produced the ON THE RUN TOUR (2014) and ON THE RUN II (2018).

Beyoncé, netflix, Homecoming

Beyoncé’s Homecoming

Writers: Vaughn Lowery, Tara McDonough, Stella Iman Dugall

Every once in a while pop culture encounters a rip in its continuum. The latest breach comes from one of the most effervescent entertainers of all time, Beyoncé Giselle Knowles Carter, as the first Black female to headline one of the most prolific festivals since the iconic Woodstock. Introspective yet intimate, Homecoming is positioned to be one of the most immersive concert series in the history of music and streaming services. Beyoncé, the Director and Executive Producer of the film, creates a visually captivating story from the beginning to end. The documentary answers a plethora of questions, at which the infamous Beyhive has had about the historical moment.

With intermittent quick cuts of her family before, during and after the epic performance, Beyoncé gives herself permission to exhibit her vulnerability. After all, she planned to take the stage at Coachella in 2017 before she was pregnant with her twins. The tour was postponed and we fast forward to ‘Mrs. Carter’ having to deal with the aftermath of a complicated pregnancy, which ultimately ends in a c-section. Similar to friend, and professional tennis superstar, Serena Williams, Beyoncé bounced back harder than ever after her tough pregnancy. Throughout the piece she digs deep and pummels through some of the most difficult days she has ever encountered. She even speaks to her weighing 218 lbs and how she was only able to zip her costume up after months of hard work alongside of a dedicated clean/raw food diet – no meats, carbs, sugars. The director of photography expertly captured an extremely intimate and vulnerable side to the strong and flawless Queen Bey.

Inspiration

Having family members as graduates of some of the prominent HBCU (historically black colleges and universities), Beyoncé was able to tap into the most celebrated moments of their collegiate life. Her full show not only highlighted the history of these schools but also their social networks and fraternal organizations; transforming the stage into one of the most dynamic Black Southern spaces of cultural legacy and pride. Much of it was enunciated with their boot dancing, a traditional dance style for HBCU called J-Setting, in between transitions. These dance formations visually anchored the performance. Contortionists contributed an urban Cirque du Soleil vibe to the display which can be more accurately described as an infused gumbo of Chicago (the musical), Moulin Rouge! and the Off-Broadway play Stomp. To date, the pyramid stage has been persevered onsite at this year’s Coachella as an art installation.

A group of 200 people shared the stage with Queen Bey including Jay Z, Kelly Rowland, Michelle Williams and Solange Knowles. The expansive crew that Beyonce worked and practiced with for 8 months is featured in the documentary, as each individual had their own part in making the event a success. The dancing in her set is not technical, but emotional. The crowd, as well as audiences watching the documentary at home, are meant to feel something from just the way Beyoncé and her dancers, who she handpicked herself, move with each other. The concert experience not only exhibits the immense talent of HBCU musicians but works towards using this heightened exposure to aid these institutions that have been struggling with little resources and grants since their establishment.

After the the release of Homecoming, Netflix will more than likely notice a spike in downloads/subscriptions; Beyonce will notice an increase in her fan base and HBCU enrollment rates will most likely skyrocket. Overall, most audience members will be thrashed into a world of black honor, history and preservation. While the Pew Report notes that there is a varying “black/white digital divide” concerning internet usage, (87% whites, 80% blacks), there is little divide when it comes to mobile platforms. The growth of black presence in media, such as on social media, in streaming services and more, will only continue due to the imminent success of Beyoncé’s partnership with Netflix. Her myriad of success as a dominant Black woman breaks down barriers in the same way Jordan Peele has done for young Black filmmakers across the diaspora. This will become one of the most treasured pieces of mass media and should offer encouragement to both women and minorities to bust through the glass ceiling on all fronts especially digitization and technology.

Beyoncé, Netflix, Homecoming

Illustrator: Alejandra Villagra

Shop Beyoncé

BEYOND THE CAPE!

April 16 through October 6

Why call this new museum show Beyond the Cape? Compared to so many other exhibitions around the world about comic books, this original and unconventional take soars beyond just superheroes.

Beyond the Cape! Comics and Contemporary Art shows how some of the most currently sought-after contemporary artists are influenced by graphic novels and comic books.

The artworks in this pioneering show making its world premiere at the Boca Raton Museum of Art take viewers on a deeper dive into adult realms, tackling some of today’s thorniest issues: politics, divisiveness, immigration, racial prejudice, planetary climate armageddon, feminism, LGBTQ rights, religion, gender, and more.

Grouped together for the first time in this new way, the exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art features prominent artworld superstars, including:

Kumasi J. Barnett, George Condo, Renee Cox, Liz Craft, Kota Ezawa, Chitra Ganesh, Mark Thomas Gibson, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Christian Marclay, Kerry James Marshall, Takahasi Murakami, Elizabeth Murray, Yoshitomo Nara, Joyce Pensato, Raymond Pettibon, Peter Saul, Kenny Scharf, William T. Wiley, David Wojnarowicz, and Michael Zansky.

Some of the most acclaimed underground comic book artists are also front-and-center, including: R. Crumb, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and Mimi Pond.

Also featured in the exhibition are artists from The Hairy Who: Gladys Nilsson, Jim Nutt, and Karl Wirsum. 

The show features more than 80 works by 40 artists: paintings, video, photography, sculpture, prints, drawings, and tapestries.

Rare comics will also be shown, plus contemporary animation and rarely seen historic cartoons from the early 1900s on vintage TVs.

This exhibition is curated by Kathleen Goncharov, Senior Curator at the museum. She recruited as her ‘muse’ for this exhibition Calvin Reid, the Senior News Editor at Publishers Weekly and a leading expert in the field of comics.

Reid was one of the first critics to recognize comics as a literary form for adults, and selected the comic books and graphic novels in the reading room where the public can comfortably lounge and enjoy reading (many from Reid’s own private library). 

“Beyond the Cape delves into the world of comics and graphic novels and their influence on contemporary artists. Their work defies commonalities, but come together to present a boldly visual, eye-opening mirror of our contemporary world and present issues,” said Irvin Lippman, the executive director of Boca Raton Museum of Art. 

Some of the surprising twists and turns visitors can see at Beyond the Cape!

Elizabeth Murray began working with comic imagery in the 1970s, when minimalism dominated the art scene. Her personal, colorful work proved that painting was still relevant and ripe for innovation, and set the stage for a return to figurative work in the 1980s. As a child she drew from newspaper comic strips, and even sent a sketchbook to Walt Disney. 

Kerry James Marshall’s work is currently at the very top of the art market. Known for his flat, colorful paintings of contemporary Black America, for the past 20 years he has been working on his comic series Rythm Mastr (set in the Black community where his Chicago studio is located).

The genesis of Rythm Mastr began with the demolition of public housing and the spike of violence in Chicago in the 1990s. He grew up in the Watts area of South-Central Los Angeles, and the Civil Rights and Black Power movements impacted this artist’s work. 

Most assume comics are primarily intended for children, usually featuring super heroes as evidenced by today’s popular films – but this exhibition is decidedly for adults.

The only references to superheroes in this show are by Renee Cox (whose Jamaican anti-racist avenger Raje does not wear a cape), and Luca Buvoli’s animation Not-a-Superhero.

Art that is flat, graphic and colorful (like the art in graphic novels and comics), is taking center stage in the Instagram age. Artists, galleries and collectors are turning to social media as the place to promote their art and find art to purchase. 

Looking beyond the 1960s Pop Art movement led by big name New York artists, this show features the “other” art movements from the 60s and 70s such as Bay Area Funk Art and the Chicago Imagists (who called themselves Hairy Who).

These artists rebelled against the formalist New York style, and during their youth, they were belittled as ‘provincial regionalists’ by the New York-centric art world of the time.

The Chicago artists in Hairy Who (Jim Nutt, Gladys Nilsson, and Karl Wirsum) have greatly influenced younger artists of today.

A nod to Japanese Manga comics and graphic novels features two major artists: Takashi Murakami and Yositomo Nara.

 

Almost all of the artists in this exhibition are living artists, except for three: Elizabeth Murray, H.C. Westermann and David Wojnarowicz.

Two works by the Indian-American artist Chitra Ganesh. One is titled City Inside Her, (2014), and another is Manuscript, (2018),

a giant 3-D hand with projected henna designs used by women in India and the Middle East

Chitra Ganesh is an Indian-American artist who combines the iconography of Hinduism, Buddhists and South Asia pictorial traditions with the contemporary popular visual language of comics, illustration and science fiction.

Her work will include a giant 3-D hand with projected henna designs used by women in India and the Middle East. She will also show a series of work loosely based on the comic book series Amar Chitra Katha (Immortal Illustrated Stories).

Ganesh’s original comic book premiered in India in 1967 and was intended to teach children traditional historical and religious stories. Unfortunately, the original series reinforced the caste system with its attendant issues of race and gender. In her work, Ganesh flips the script by highlighting alternative feminist narratives. 

California artist Peter Saul, 85, was not taken seriously outside of California until relatively recently. Today his work is in great demand and is a major influence on young artists. Similar to comics, his work is irreverent, idiosyncratic, colorful and political. 

Koto Ezawa’s comics-inspired animation tells the story of the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum art heist. 

Michael Zansky, the son of Louis Zansky who drew the early “Classic Comics” in the 1940s, is a painter and multi-media artist whose monumental large cut, burnt and carved wood panels feature mysterious hybrid creatures inspired by comics, ancient art and works from the Western art canon.  

Another family connection is Jody Culkin who is a descendant of Harriet Hosmer, a prominent neo-sculptor who lived in Rome in the 19th century. Hosmer was a scholar, an inventor, writer and feminist. She wrote a play set in London and in the then-future (1977) in which mummies come to life in the British Museum. Featured in this exhibition is the rarely seen animated comic Culkin made about this play. 

  

Kumasi Barnett uses actual comic books in his work to create new characters such as The Amazing Black-Man. His nine works featured in this show will be encased in plastic, the way rare comics are sold.

THE IKEA READING ROOM

An extensive reading room designed by IKEA features hundreds of graphic novels and comics for the public to comfortably peruse in a relaxed setting.

Selected by Calvin Reid, Senior News Editor at Publishers Weekly, the 200+ comic books and graphic novels include many from his own personal library.

The public can enjoy reading works by Lynda Barry, Allison Bechdel, Roz Chast, R. Crumb, Aline-Kominsky Crumb, Mimi Pond, Trina Robbins, Art Spiegelman, George Takei and Ronald Wimberly, and many others.

Reid began writing in the 1980s, about the same time Art Spiegelman and R. Crumb, alumni of the underground RAW comics, emerged as serious figures in the comic world. Spiegelman’s MAUS is probably the first graphic novel to reach a wide audience.  

A goal in providing the reading room is to inspire fans of graphic novels who may not be prone to visit a museum to take the leap, walk into a museum and experience works of art in person. Rare comics and a series of contemporary and historic animation works will also be on view. 

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by the Museum’s Leadership Fund, with major funding from: Estate of Ardele L. Garrod, Isadore & Kelly Friedman Foundation, PNC Bank, Jody H. & Martin Grass, Anne & Scott P. Schlesinger, Jennifer & Marc Bell, Dalia & Duane Stiller, Susan & Eric Kane and Laurence W. Levine Foundation, Angela & John DesPrez III, El Ad National Properties and Alina Properties, Joy & Richard Blakeman and Lisette Model Foundation, Karen Mashkin, Patricia Savides, Schmidt Family Foundation, the Museum’s Friends Auxiliary, and those who wish to remain anonymous. 

In-kind corporate support for the exhibition is generously provided by IKEA.

— Jellyfish Eyes, by Takashi Murakami, (2003), collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody

Gwen Stefani’s Cool gets a synth cover by Strath

STRATH COVERS GWEN STEFANI’S COOL

Most use the California poppies for pretty instagrams.

Fewer use them to film music videos.

Strath falls into the latter.

The 24-year-old Australian artist took full advantage of the super bloom in his debut music video for his latest release “Cool”. The track is a cover of the 2004 Gwen Stefani smash hit. 15 years later, Strath adds new color to the track’s pop virtues, letting his listeners stew in a sea of sweeping 80s synthesizers that smell a lot like Tame Impala.

A real highlight is the brief musical interlude in the song’s middle, where a new guitar/synth melody soars over the tight groove of spank-y drums and walking bass line. A credit to his talents as a producer, the way Strath balances many unique elements in the mix ensure that this track is a real head-bopper.

The nostalgic, slightly haunting feel of the song’s outro leaves it feeling more sombre than the original. But the playful tone of the music video — where Strath sings next to a couple that must have been making out for several hours during production — perhaps suggests otherwise.

Strath affirms in the YouTube video’s description that the video was shot with “care” in the poppy fields. Whilst we hope that was the case, we can confirm with confidence that this track is a real banger.

COOL (Stream/Download):

Spotify | Apple Music

Watch the music video on youtube.

ABOUT STRATH

Strath spent his first 18 years in Melbourne, Australia, writing songs during the day while playing in different jazz and rock bands at night. He moved halfway across the world to go to Harvard, where he spent the next 4 years making movies and even more tracks. After graduation, he relocated to LA, where he’s released a number of singles including “Loops,” “I Know You Too Well” and a cover of the 2004 Gwen Stefani smash hit, “Cool.” He plans on releasing lots of new music in 2019.

COOL (Stream/Download)

Spotify | Apple Music

Watch the music video on youtube.

Follow Strath on Social Media

Instagram I Soundcloud I Spotify

“Peer Pressure” Music Video Premiere

TUNE IN: JAMES BAY & JULIA MICHAELS PREMIERE OFFICIAL “PEER PRESSURE” MUSIC VIDEO TOMORROW

YouTube Premiere Watch Party Starts At 10AM EST

Video Live At 12PM EST

Watch HERE

Listen to “Peer Pressure” HERE

Mad About Jewelry

THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN’S ANNUAL EXHIBITION AND SALE OF CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY RETURNS WITH 55 ARTISTS FROM 18 COUNTRIES

LOOT: MAD ABOUT JEWELRY

April 8 – April 13, 2019

Opening Benefit: April 8

Featuring the announcement of the LOOT Acquisition Prize and the presentation of LOOT Awards honoring Adria de Haume and Josie Natori

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) presents the nineteenth edition of LOOT: MAD About Jewelry, its annual exhibition and sale of one-of-a-kind contemporary jewelry. Open to the public April 9 through April 13, following the Opening Benefit on April 8, LOOT 2019 showcases the work of fifty-five emerging and acclaimed international jewelry artists and designers, most of whom have never been shown in New York. The event provides the rare opportunity for collectors and jewelry enthusiasts to meet and acquire pieces from some of the most innovative creators in the field.

“The jewelry content of LOOT 2019 is particularly noteworthy in two specific areas,” said LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp. “Firstly, this year’s exhibition presents a great number of outstanding young makers who are already creating groundbreaking work. Secondly, it features a larger presence of jewelry in precious metals, particularly in silver and in gold, often with semi precious and precious stones, that is exceptionally original in design.”

MAD is the only museum in the United States with a gallery dedicated to the display of both special jewelry exhibitions and its permanent collection of contemporary and modern studio and art jewelry. LOOT extends MAD’s commitment to presenting jewelry as an art form, and provides vital support for Museum exhibitions and programs.

“LOOT reflects the core of MAD’s mission to celebrate the creative process and connect audiences to contemporary art and design,” said Marsy Mittlemann, LOOT 2019 Co-Chair. “It presents an extraordinary opportunity for artists and viewers to interact with one another and engage in conversations around the work. I am honored to participate in an event that provides a platform for international talent while supporting MAD’s exciting upcoming initiatives.”

“LOOT is always exceptionally curated, and 2019 promises to be the best edition to date,” said LOOT 2019 Co-Chair Joan Hornig. “No other exhibition in the world brings viewers into contact with the diversity of design and designers showcased each spring at MAD. It is the perfect venue for both serious and first-time collectors to engage with global talent and purchase unique pieces of wearable art at every price point.”

LOOT 2019 features fifty-five artists from eighteen countries and territories: Austria (1), Belgium (1), Chile (2), Finland (1), France (2), Germany (6), Italy (2), Korea (5), Poland (1), Portugal (2), Spain (5), Sweden (1), Taiwan (1), Thailand (1), Turkey (3), the United Kingdom (14), the United States (6), and the US Virgin Islands (1). In addition to a diverse range of artistic practices, the jewelry on display encompasses a wide array of materials, from traditional metals to more unconventional media like leather, glass, porcelain, paper, silicone, resin, textiles, wood, horsehair, recycled skateboards, and ultraviolet-reactive nylon.

ARTIST HIGHLIGHTS

The jewelry artists and designers featured in LOOT 2019 include the following:

  • Italian designer Selvaggia Armani designs and produces textiles, including necklaces and brooches, for home and casual wear. On site at LOOT, she will create a new collection of jewelry made of hand-painted leather, building on her practice of “live” painting and customized bracelets.
  • Japan-born and Massachusetts-based artist Mariko Kusumoto prevails upon fabric to construct forms of elegant simplicity and evocative imagery. Using a proprietary heat- setting technique, she gives the fabric a new identity through reshaping it into three- dimensional forms. Her designs are incorporated into jewelry and sculptural pieces, as well as in collaborations with fashion designers; in January, her work appeared on the Jean-Paul Gaultier catwalk at Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2019.
  • Taiwanese jewelry artist Heng Lee juxtaposes traditional craft technique and cutting- edge technology to explore the relationship between nature and Internet culture. Using downloaded images, laser-cut metal, and hand embroidery, he creates visually striking pieces that are both digital and tactile. In a time when much of our information comes from social media, his work interrogates the divide between experience and technology, and encourages full awareness of the current moment.
  • Scotland-based artist Wanshu Li is largely inspired by the brilliant colors and sensuous movements of sea creatures like jellyfish and sea anemones. With her jewelry, she aims to create a multisensory wearing experience that involves visual enjoyment, tactility, and sound. Li’s fascination with dance culture, laser light shows, and stage performances inspired her to add a further visual dimension to her practice: she experiments with ultraviolet-reactive nylon and fluorescent paints, which combine to produce a remarkable intensity of color when the jewelry is illuminated with UV light.
  • Houston-based designer Mariquita Masterson creates handmade glass pieces that are vivid, unique, and energetic, and that unite the everyday with the exceptional. Masterson uses both recycled glass and glass from companies that produce a variety of colors and textures, and on occasion creates stunning pieces out of the fragments of broken antique vases. Most recently, Masterson has gained attention for the debut of one of her necklaces worn by Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi during the President’s State of the Union address in February.

This year, LOOT will showcase the work of four 2018 graduates of La Escuela de Arte 3, in Madrid, Spain: Patricia Álvarez, Cristina Armesilla, Sonia Birndt Carrascosa, and Bárbara García. The jewelry of these emerging creators exhibits fresh expressions of color and form, and takes inspiration from music, technology, contradiction, and the city they call home.

In its first year, the LOOT Advisory Committee assists LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp with the selection of artists and designers. The LOOT Advisory Committee for 2019 includes Susan Ach, Michele Cohen, Marsy Mittlemann, and Barbara Waldman.

LOOT ACQUISITION PRIZE

Awarded annually by a jury, the LOOT Acquisition Prize recognizes a LOOT jewelry artist or designer whose work reflects maturity in artistry and concept, exhibits both a superior and an experimental understanding of materials and form, and demonstrates expertise in technique and execution. MAD’s permanent collection includes nearly one thousand pieces of jewelry, spanning the mid-twentieth century to the present day. The LOOT Acquisition Prize formalizes the Museum’s goal of enhancing its collection by acquiring jewelry from artists who have made significant contributions to the field and whose work provides historical context for MAD’s mid- to late-twentieth-century pieces, as well as from emerging artists who are an important force in the contemporary art jewelry scene.

The 2019 jury is chaired by Barbara Paris Gifford and Elissa Auther together with LOOT Co- Chairs Joan Hornig and Marsy Mittlemann, LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp, and Board Chair Michele Cohen. The 2019 LOOT Acquisition Prize will be awarded on April 8 during the Opening Benefit dinner.

In 2018, the prize was jointly awarded to Isabelle Molénat and Sarran Youkongdee. Past LOOT artists who have had works acquired by the Museum include the well-established art jeweler Iris Nieuwenburg and the emerging jewelry artist Casey Sobel. Alena Willroth, who was awarded the inaugural LOOT Acquisition Prize in 2016, will be a returning artist this year.

OPENING BENEFIT AND LOOT AWARD

The LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit takes place on Monday, April 8, beginning with a cocktail hour and reception at 4:30 pm. The evening’s activities include first access to the LOOT exhibition and sale—an exclusive opportunity to meet this year’s artists and acquire their designs—as well as a dinner honoring the recipients of the LOOT Award.

The LOOT Award recognizes luminaries in the field of jewelry, including artists, collectors, and designers. This year’s honorees are jewelry designer and philanthropist Adria de Haume and jewelry and fashion designer Josie Natori. Past recipients include fashion icon Iris Apfel (2013), collector Barbara Berger (2013), jewelry designer Joan Hornig (2016), fashion designer Kay Unger (2016), and artists Joyce J. Scott (2014) and Axel Russmeyer (2012).

The LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit Host Committee comprises Susan Ach, Iris Apfel, Davina Benshetrit, Caroline Blackman, Noreen Buckfire, Marian C. Burke, Kathy Chazen, Michele Cohen, Paolo Costagli, Stacy Creamer, Emily Cutler, Marcia Docter, Patti Dweck, Beth Farber, Sandy Grotta, Joon Han, Jan Huling, Barbara Jacobs, Ann Kaplan, Wendy Tarlow Kaplan, Jane Koryn, Laura Kruger, Luisa LaViola, Bonnie Levine, Pam Levine, Tina Livanos, Jackie Martin, Stacey Mayrock, Ella McHugh, Robert Lee Morris, Edie Nadler, Michelle Perr, Linda Plattus, Andi Potamkin, Barbara Regna, Heidi Rigney, Deborah Roberts, Lela Rose, Jill Ryan, Bette Saltzman, Gail Shields-Miller, Angela Sun, Ted Taylor, Barbara Tober, Isabel and Ruben Toledo, Kay Unger, Barbara Waldman, Janet Winter, Marcia Celis Wirth, Pamela Workman, Jan Wysocki, and Lynn Yaeger.

To purchase tickets to the LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit, to be held on Monday, April 8, visit thestore.madmuseum.org/collections/loot-2019, or contact Rebekka Grossman at 212.299.7712 or rebekka.grossman@madmuseum.org.

PUBLIC EXHIBITION AND SALE HOURS

Tuesday, April 9: 10am to 6pm

Wednesday, April 10: 10am to 6pm

Thursday, April 11: 10am to 6pm

Friday, April 12: 10am to 6pm

Saturday, April 13: 10am to 6pm

Entrance to LOOT is included in the price of Museum admission: $16 general; $14 for seniors; $12 for students; free for MAD members and children under 18 years of age. To purchase tickets online, visit madmuseum.org/visit.

ABOUT CORPORATE SPONSOR: PAOLO COSTAGLI

Paolo Costagli New York returns as corporate sponsor of LOOT. The fine jewelry brand recognized for its sophisticated, modern, and distinctly bold designs, will debut Onde, its new collection of 18kt gold and diamond jewelry at LOOT 2019. The Onde collection, inspired by the waves of the Venetian Lagoon, introduces a variety of rings, earrings, bracelets, and necklaces. Featuring Paolo Costagli’s signature bold geometrics with a touch of fluidity, the collection presents effortlessly chic precious jewelry fit for all occasions, from everyday wear to a formal soirée.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) champions contemporary makers across creative fields and presents the work of artists, designers, and artisans who apply the highest level of ingenuity and skill. Since the Museum’s founding in 1956 by philanthropist and visionary Aileen Osborn Webb, MAD has celebrated all facets of making and the creative processes by which materials are transformed, from traditional techniques to cutting-edge technologies. Today, the Museum’s curatorial program builds upon a rich history of exhibitions that emphasize a cross-disciplinary approach to art and design, and reveals the workmanship behind the objects and environments that shape our everyday lives. MAD provides an international platform for practitioners who are influencing the direction of cultural production and driving twenty-first-century innovation, and fosters a participatory setting for visitors to have direct encounters with skilled making and compelling works of art and design. For more information, visit their website.

A VAN GOGH

A Van Gogh, Without a Doubt

The Wadsworth Atheneum’s Vase with Poppies, c. 1886 is Authenticated

After nearly 30 years of doubt, the Wadsworth Atheneum’s painting, Vase with Poppies, by Vincent Van Gogh, has now been fully authenticated by specialists at the Van Gogh Museum. While the painting came to the Wadsworth in a bequest from the writer and French Impressionist collector Anne Parrish Titzell in 1957 along with works by Renoir, Monet, and Redon, Vase with Poppies has been difficult to confidently attribute since questions about Van Gogh’s practice remained unresolved. Experts in Amsterdam following scientific and art-historical inquiry have determined that the painting technically and stylistically concurs with Van Gogh’s documented work in 1886. This new finding means that the Wadsworth is home to two Van Gogh’s, Vase with Poppies will join Self Portrait, both painted during his Paris period 1886-1887 atop earlier paintings.

Vase with Poppies fits stylistically with a group of works the artist made shortly after arriving to Paris in the spring of 1886. Van Gogh took advantage of the easy access to flowers as he reinvented his stylistic approach after two years of depicting peasant life in Nuenen. His embrace of a more vibrant palette and light filled renderings of humble subjects–flowers, nuts, fruit–is evident in this simple composition of cut poppies in a plain cylindrical vase. In his words in an 1886 letter to fellow artist Horace M. Livens, “And now for what regards what I myself have been doing, I have lacked money for paying models else I had entirely given myself to figure painting. But I have made a series of color studies in painting, simply flowers, red poppies, blue corn flowers and myosotys, white and rose roses, yellow chrysanthemums–seeking oppositions of blue with orange, red and green, yellow and violet seeking les tons rompus et neutres to harmonize brutal extremes.”

Concurrent to the physical examinations by the team at the Van Gogh Museum, recent investigations uncovered that the painting was exhibited at the watershed 1913 Armory Show in New York City. These new investigations were all prompted by the Wadsworth conservation lab using newly acquired imaging equipment through the generosity of the Sherman Fairchild Foundation. Digital x-ray and advanced infrared reflectograms revealed with greater clarity than ever before the presence of an earlier painting beneath the current composition. These early forensic findings made sending Vase with Poppies to the Van Gogh Museum for advanced study the logical next step. Their work–analyzing the paint, materials, linen, style–enabled a level of professional scrutiny and artist specific context to arrive at this new judgement of authenticity with great confidence.

“It was a pleasure for our museum to work together with the Wadsworth Atheneum on this particular project,” says Louis van Tilborgh Senior Researcher, Van Gogh Museum, and Professor of Art History, specializing in Van Gogh, University of Amsterdam. “When in 1970 Van Gogh’s oeuvre catalogue by De la Faille was published, it was seen by many as a progress report. It contained too many “floaters” in terms of both dating and authenticity to admit that a firm, unequivocal, authentic oeuvre had been established, to quote the eminent art historian Ronald Pickvance. Now, almost fifty years later, one can say that slowly but surely, real progress is being made in Van Gogh studies. Some of these floaters even turned out to be firmly anchored in Van Gogh’s oeuvre, and Vase with Poppies, I am happy to say, is one of them.”

“This extraordinary collaboration and harnessing of technology and professional discernment simply not available until now is a reminder of the opportunities today to both enrich discourse in the field and take stock in our collections,” says Director and CEO of the Wadsworth Thomas J. Loughman. “These studies have revealed just how much we still need to learn about Vincent and his growth as a painter, new to Paris and exploring new avenues for his art.”

The painting will return home to the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut just in time for the opening of the 38th Annual Fine Art and Flowers on Friday, April 26, 2019. Vase with Poppies will next go on loan to Europe for The Museum Barberini in Potsdam, Germany’s exhibition Van Gogh: Still Lifes (October 26, 2019 to February 2, 2020) where it will join a number of these transitional works, allowing the public and scholars alike, access to this exciting development through side-by-side display.

About the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

Founded in 1842, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is the oldest continuously operating public art museum in the United States. The museum’s nearly 50,000 works of art span 5,000 years, from Greek and Roman antiquities to the first museum collection of American contemporary art. The Wadsworth Atheneum’s five connected buildings–representing architectural styles from Gothic Revival to modern International Style–are located at 600 Main Street in Hartford, Conn. Hours: Wednesday-Friday: 11am-5pm; Saturday and Sunday: 10am-5pm Admission: $5-15; discounts for members, students and seniors. Free admission for Hartford residents with Wadsworth Welcome registration. Free “happy hour” admission 4-5pm Public phone: (860) 278-2670; website: thewadsworth.org.

 

Image:Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), Vase with Poppies, c. 1886. Oil on canvas. 21 1/2 x 17 3/4 in. Bequest of Anne Parrish Titzell. 1957.617