Posts tagged with "Apple"

Kendall Jackson, White Wine Emoji, 360 MAGAZINE

WHITE WINE EMOJI

THE WHITE WINE EMOJI WILL NEED TO CONTINUE TO AGE

Kendall-Jackson, the iconic leader of California Chardonnay, and the dozens of other supporting wine partners will have to wait a bit longer to toast its newest wine release, a White Wine Emoji

Kendall-Jackson’s 19-page proposal for a White Wine Emoji, now in its third draft, was up for review by the Unicode Technical Committee (UTC) at their July meeting held on the Microsoft Campus in Redmond, WA.  However, the White Wine Emoji will need more time to age – official meeting notes released from the UTC states that they will, “Continue to consider ‘white wine’ emoji for future addition,” and has a UTC Action Item, 160-A43, to do precisely that.

“The debate actually centers around color, not wine,” says Maggie Curry, Director of Marketing for Kendall-Jackson.  “Since a red wine emoji already exists, the white wine emoji is seen as a color variation and adding color variation to an emoji is proving more complex because the Unicode standard is not fully defined.”  With the UTC tasked at protecting the global keyboard, the addition of white wine has to be carefully considered, as it might open the door to many emoji color variations (Rosé wine for example, shades of beer, or even different color animals).

Kendall-Jackson vows to continue leading their efforts and global movement, and are hopeful to see progress on the proposal soon.  “The white wine emoji effort has garnered enthusiasm from around the globe, and we continue to refine our proposal to support the white wine emoji,” says Maggie Curry, Director of Marketing for Kendall-Jackson. 

Kendall-Jackson is currently updating their proposal for a fourth time, adding additional research that proves white wine as a necessary addition beyond red wine for emoji communication based on global use, economy, culture and industry.   

“For example, white wine is paramount in regions such as Alto Adige with Pinot Grigio, Mosel with Riesling, and Sancerre with Sauvignon Blanc, and there is currently no way to communicate by symbol when it comes to wine in those geographies,” says Curry “What started as a fun idea has now turned into a complex effort for Kendall-Jackson, the wine community, and wine fans around the globe.”

Kendall-Jackson and their global partners encourage the wine community to continue to call for the white wine emoji by using #WhiteWineEmoji on their social channels, which is easily tracked by Unicode to show global want and need.

As Pliny the Elder once said, “In vino veritas” (in wine there is truth), and Kendall-Jackson continues to push for wine symbol color variation to convey truth in the modern wine communication zeitgeist.  

About Kendall-Jackson Winery
Kendall-Jackson is one of America’s most beloved family-owned and operated wineries. Founded by entrepreneur and visionary Jess Jackson in 1982, and now led by his wife Barbara Banke and the second and third generation of the Jackson Family, Kendall-Jackson is based in Sonoma County and offers a range of acclaimed wines grown on estate vineyards along the coastal ridges of California. A leader in sustainable vineyard and winery practices, including water and energy conservation and natural pest control, 100 percent of Kendall-Jackson’s vineyards in California are third party certified by SIP (Sustainable in Practice) and CCSW (Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing). Kendall-Jackson was recently named 2017 Winery of the Year by Wine Enthusiast Magazine, recognized as a benchmark in the wine industry. The winery’s seminal wine, the Vintner’s Reserve Chardonnay, has been America’s favorite Chardonnay for the past 25 years, and the 2015 vintage was ranked No. 28 on Wine Spectator’s Top 100 list in 2017. Learn more online at www.kj.com, and follow Kendall-Jackson on FacebookTwitter or Instagram.

Tech’s Impact on Journalism

In the epicenter of big tech, Representative Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11) joined Audrey Cooper, the Executive Editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, CEO of CalMatters and the former Executive Editor of Bay Area News Group Neil Chase, and Save Journalism Project co-founders Laura Bassett, a laid-off HuffPost reporter, and John Stanton, laid-off former D.C. bureau chief of BuzzFeed, to shine a light on the plight of local news and a key culprit: big tech.   

n the first quarter of 2019, the media has shed more than 2,400 jobs – including East Bay Express staffers – and, over the past 10 years, newsrooms have declined in size by 45%. The plight of the journalism industry has generated bipartisan congressional action, a rather unique occurrence in this polarized political climate. And while the journalism industry faces many challenges, the focus of Congress’ current action is to halt big tech’s negative impact on the economic sustainability of the free press. Wednesday’s speakers will address this unusual bipartisan action and the widespread consequences of the loss of local news.

According to Representative Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11), “Not that long ago, the Bay Area was home to over 1,500 journalists, but now there are less than 300 serving roughly 7 million people. This problem is not unique to our community—it is happening in every corner of the country, and we need to act. During a time when fact and accountability are under constant attack, today’s conversation about ways to preserve and protect local news and high-quality journalism is critical to the health of our democracy.”

According to Neil Chase, CEO of CalMatters and the former Executive Editor of Bay Area News Group, “I’m glad we had such a deep, meaningful conversation about the challenges facing journalism today, right here in downtown San Francisco. If we can’t solve it here, we can’t hope to help the places across America that don’t have the technology and financial resources that are available in a place like this.”

According to Laura Bassett, laid-off HuffPost senior politics reporter and co-founder of the Save Journalism Project, “As our country grapples with natural disasters, political turmoil, violence, and everyday life, Americans rely on journalists and the news industry to explain and break through the chaos. But, for that process to survive, we need well-staffed newsrooms and a blossoming industry. Instead, big tech is decimating journalism. Facebook, Google, and big tech have consumed the digital landscape and continue to threaten local and national journalism. We need our elected officials to weigh in, to reign in big tech, and to save the journalism industry, before this goes any further.”

And, according to John Stanton, laid-off former D.C. bureau chief of BuzzFeed and co-founder of the Save Journalism Project, “The irony of all ironies, we live streamed today’s event on Facebook to ensure it reached the largest audience. The mere fact that we had to rely on the conglomerate proves our point: Facebook and Google have too much power. Together, they control the landscape, the audience, and the content. I saw this first hand at BuzzFeed, when Facebook, without notice, changed its algorithm, resulting in huge viewership and financial losses for the company. As more and more local and national news outlets feel the death grip of big tech, we need Congress to step in and save journalism.”

 

Journalism in America is facing an existential threat from the monopolistic control of tech giants like Google, Facebook, and Apple. Big tech’s dominance over the digital advertising market and their unrivaled capacity to monetize its platforms are having drastic effects on journalism as a whole.

How eating habits have an impact on our oral health

Will An Apple A Day – Along With Checkups – Help Keep Tooth Decay Away?

Eating may be a necessity, but when it comes to your teeth and gums, all that munching also can lead to quite a battle raging in your mouth.

Some of those foods – especially the sugary and starchy ones – act like invading forces, feeding the bacteria that cause tooth decay and gum disease, even as the saliva in your mouth fights back as best it can, trying to ward off the detrimental effects of the acids and enzymes.

“Tooth decay can be a problem for people of all ages – children, teenagers and adults  –  and yet it’s completely avoidable,” says Dr. Seth Newman (www.asktheorthos.com), an orthodontist and co-author with Dr. Steve Giannoutsos of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid To Ask.

Newman and Giannoutsos say that there are plenty of ways that what’s in your diet affects not just your weight, but also your teeth and gums.

“Most people know that sugar and processed snacks can lead to tooth decay, even if they don’t always avoid those foods,” Giannoutsos says. “But there are other foods that also can be troublesome, and many people may not realize that.”

He and Newman provide a few tips for making sure your diet isn’t harmful to your oral health:

Watch out for bread – and chips. Chomp down on a candy bar and you might think to yourself that you better brush soon, lest the sugar go to work on your teeth before you can head it off. But the same thought might not occur to you when you’re eating breadsticks. Yet, foods that are high in carbohydrates and starches – such as bread, chips, pasta and crackers – contribute to the plaque acid that attacks tooth enamel.

Braces come with extra concerns. Beyond the usual dental care, there are additional dietary worries to consider when you have braces. People wearing braces should avoid foods that are too hard, sticky or chewy, Newman says, such as gum, nuts, corn chips, hard taco shells, hard candy and popcorn, just to name a few.

Develop good food-choice habits. When you’re grocery shopping, always check the nutrition labels. “Selecting snacks that are low in sugar can help combat tooth decay,” Giannoutsos says. “If poor nutrition continues, your oral health will decline, potentially resulting in gum disease and tooth loss.” Fruits and vegetables that are rich in fiber are a good choice for improving your oral health. Examples are apples, carrots and celery. In addition, milk, cheese and other dairy products are excellent options because of the calcium, phosphate and vitamin D they contain. Finally, drink fluoridated water as much as possible. If your tap water doesn’t include fluoride, check with your dentist for a fluoride supplement.

Ultimately, more is at stake than your teeth and gums. Left untreated, Giannoutsos and Newman say, oral-health problems can have a detrimental effect on your overall health, contributing to such conditions as heart disease and diabetes. That’s an additional reason why regular checkups – along with brushing and flossing – are so critical.

“It’s hard to resist your inner sweet tooth, so I wouldn’t say that you should never indulge in treats,” Newman says. “But when you do, brushing your teeth as quickly as possible afterwards will help decrease the risk of decay.”

About Seth Newman, DDS

Dr. Seth Newman (www.asktheorthos.com) is an orthodontist and co-author, with Dr. Steve Giannoutsos, of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid To Ask. He owns orthodontic practices in the New York City area. Dr. Newman completed his dental training at Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine, where he was a member of the National Dental Honor Society. He was a clinical instructor of the Invisalign system at the NYU School of Dentistry.

About  Dr. Efstathios “Steve” Giannoutsos 
Dr. Efstathios Giannoutsos, or “Dr. G.” as he is commonly called, was born in Astoria, Queens, just outside of New York City. He graduated from St. John’s University in Jamaica, Queens, with high honors and a BS in Biology.  He is also the co-author with  Dr. Seth Newman of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid to Ask(www.asktheorthos.com)He completed his dental training at NYU, where he graduated with a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) degree. He was also accepted into NYU’s highly competitive orthodontic residency program. During that time, he also discovered a passion for treating children and adults with facial deformities. Coinciding his passion, his research thesis to attain specialty certification involved children with cleft deformities.

Big Willie Robinson: “Larger Than Life”

LA Times Studios today launched “Larger Than Life,” a docu-series about legendary Los Angeles street racer Big Willie Robinson. Reported and hosted by Times staff writer Daniel Miller, the seven-part podcast series tells the true story of a street racer who united Los Angeles — but left behind a tangle of questions. Watch the trailer here.

In 1960s Los Angeles, after the catastrophic Watts Riots, a legendary character emerged — one who found an unexpected way to bring people together, across race and class. Big Willie, a 6-foot-6, muscle-bound gearhead, used street racing to heal a city torn apart by violence. Cops and criminals, movie stars and miscreants, even Crips and Bloods — out at the drag strip, Big Willie could get them all to see eye to eye.

His street diplomacy eased racial tensions and united L.A. But what caused Big Willie to fade into obscurity? Exploring the life and legacy of L.A.’s “King of the Street,” the series shares never-before-revealed details uncovered through Miller’s investigative work, as well as personal stories from Willie’s inner circle, including members of the International Brotherhood of Street Racers.

The first two episodes are available now, everywhere podcasts are available (AppleSpotifyStitcher), with episodes dropping each week. Listeners can also discover bonus content for each episode on latimes.com, including exclusive footage, images and more. An essay about the project by Daniel Miller will be available in the Sunday edition of the newspaper on July 14.

How Big Tech Is Destroying Our Press

Ahead of today’s House Judiciary Hearing, the Save Journalism Project held a press call with Rep. Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11); journalists Laura Bassett, laid off by HuffPost; and John Stanton, laid off by BuzzFeed; and Neil Chase, CEO of CalMatters and former executive editor of The Mercury News and East Bay Times.

The monopolistic power of big tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Apple is destroying the economic model of the entire journalism industry, whether its traditional circulation newspapers or digital news outlet.

 This week’s hearing on how digital platforms affect news organizations marks the much-needed return of congressional antitrust scrutiny to big tech companies, which have gained a monopolistic position that lets them dominate the digital advertising marketplace and distribute massive amounts of content from news publishers on their platforms without paying to produce the content. 

Rep. Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11) said, “I don’t think there’s anything more important right now than this issue. Being from the Bay Area, I have been to every big tech company. After meeting with them, I think it’s time to make it easier for licensing like the music and movie industries have done. We are members of Congress, you are journalists, and we have to keep an appropriate Constitutional distance, but there are policy proposals in our legislation that protect the freedom of the press and are necessary to keep the industry alive. When I was first elected to the Concord City Council there was a reporter who was consistently in the front row keeping officials accountable. His presence made local government work, and it is vital that we protect the journalism industry to make sure leaders are kept accountable and communities are informed.”

Laura Bassett, a reporter who was laid off by HuffPost, commented, “In the first few months of 2019, I was one of about 2,400 journalists and media staffers who lost our jobs. Even though I was aware the cuts were coming, it was still shocking to be laid off after nearly a decade in my newsroom. The reason for the mass layoffs, I found out, was that Big Tech companies like Google and Facebook are dominating the digital ad market, swallowing about 60 percent of all revenue and making it difficult for journalism to survive. News publishers are being forced to give a cut of their ad revenue to these companies- revenue that would otherwise go to hiring journalists. Because a well-funded news media is vital to a healthy democracy, the public needs to be aware of Big Tech’s death grip on publishers. At the House Judiciary Hearing today, lawmakers in Congress need to address this bipartisan issue and find legislative solutions that regulate tech giants and restore fairness to the digital ad market. Journalists are taught not to be the story, but as Big Tech’s digital ad monopoly benefits off of our revenue streams, it’s incumbent upon us to fight for the future of our industry. One or two companies should not have the power to cripple the free press.”

“After 20 years of covering Congress and the White House for BuzzFeed, I found out layoffs were coming in a tweet from the Wall Street Journal,” said John Stanton, former Buzzfeed Washington Bureau Chief before being laid off. “Despite the great work my colleagues and I were doing for the publication, there simply wasn’t enough money. Because stories that lead to changes in state and federal law, jailing of criminals and exposing wrongdoing — cost money. Money that is increasingly gobbled up by Google and Facebook. To try to survive, slashes had to be made. To entire desks. The reason advertising revenue has fallen so steeply is that Google and Facebook dominate the digital ad market, consuming more than 60 percent of all revenue. And their share is growing, because they devour nine out of every ten new dollars that are spent on digital advertising. Big Tech’s monopoly has a death grip on publishers. Congress needs to be discussing how to regulate this imbalance and restore competitive fairness in the digital market.”

Neil Chase, CEO of CalMatters and former executive editor of The Mercury News and East Bay Times, added, “We all believe journalism is central to democracy. Newspapers have experienced a decline not in the past five years, not in the past ten or fifteen years, but in the past seventy-five years. Newspapers have been declining since World War II. The problem is that we are essentially sitting on a 200 year-old product, but are trying to compete with new and changing technologies. Newspapers have maintained a monopoly for over 200 years. This is how people historically gained all their information; how they found where to buy clothing, where to buy their groceries, and where they got their news. With the change in how society works, all we have is the news. In order to solve this problem, we need a multi-pronged approach. We need to engage in philanthropy, which my company is already focused on this aspect. We need newspapers with benevolent leaders, not the leaders that we have at some major news organizations now. We need support from legislators. And, we need people paying for the news. We need a lot of support from a lot of different places in order to make this work.”

Save Journalism Project Launches To Protect Our Press From Big Tech

BuzzFeed Reports on Recently Laid Off Journalists Serving  As Spox For New Campaign To Save Journalism From Monopolistic Power of Big Tech Companies

Today, BuzzFeed reports on the Save Journalism Project that’s launching to raise awareness and engagement about the critical need to save journalism as it faces an existential threat—the monopolistic power of big tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Apple destroying the economic model of the entire journalism industry, whether its traditional circulation newspapers or digital news outlets. At the same time, Google and Facebook have made acquisition after acquisition, gaining a monopolistic position that lets them dominate the digital advertising marketplace and distribute massive amounts of content from news publishers on their platforms without paying to produce the content. Just now are Facebook, Google, and other tech giants facing federal government and Congressional antitrust scrutiny.

Two recently laid off reporters will serve as spokespeople for the Save Journalism Project, Laura Bassett  and John StantonLearn More and Join the Fight at SaveJournalism.org and@SaveTheNews.

BuzzFeed: These Reporters Lost Their Jobs. Now They’re Fighting Back Against Big Tech.

“John Stanton and Laura Bassett are warning about what they believe the tech industry is doing to journalism, as thousands have lost their jobs this year alone.

By Rosie Gray”

Two prominent reporters who were recently laid off from digital media outlets are forming a new advocacy group formed to raise awareness about big tech’s impact on the journalism industry.

John Stanton, a longtime congressional correspondent and former BuzzFeed News Washington bureau chief, and Laura Bassett, a former culture and political reporter for nearly 10 years at the Huffington Post, have teamed up to launch a new initiative called the Save Journalism Project. The two have first-hand experience with the troubled state of the news industry: Stanton was laid off from BuzzFeed News during a round of layoffs that affected 200 people company-wide this winter and spurred a unionization drive among the news staff. Bassett lost her job in similar fashion in January after Huffington Post laid off 20 employees as part of larger cuts at its parent company, Verizon Media.

This year has been one of the worst in recent memory for journalism jobs. Across the industry, thousands have lost their jobs: from BuzzFeed News, Vice, CNN, and others across the country at local publications. Media organizations have been imperiled by crashing advertising revenues as Facebook and Google vacuum up available ad dollars.

Their new project will be set up as a nonprofit, according to Eddie Vale, a Democratic consultant whose firm is providing the man-power to launch the effort. Vale pitched Bassett on the idea, and the two of them brought in Stanton. Vale said initial funding had been secured from “someone who doesn’t want to be public so Google and Facebook don’t go after them,” and the group plans to continue to fundraise. So far, the pair have co-authored testimony given to the Senate Judiciary Committee highlighting the tech giants’ impact on the news industry — “since being laid off, we’ve made it our mission to understand how the digital marketplace works and how Big Tech is killing the journalism industry,” they wrote — flown a plane above Google’s I/O conference, and authored op-eds.

A key part of their goal is to get journalists, who aren’t known for showing a keen interest in the business side of their publications or for engaging in advocacy themselves, to take an active role in defending the future of their jobs. In an interview, Stanton said they were “trying to educate the public and members of Congress and also start encouraging our colleagues to speak up.”

“Reporters are not generally super interested in speaking about their own problems and about things that affect them directly because they feel like it becomes a conflict of interest, and in certain ways that’s true,” Stanton said. “But when the future of the free press is being pretty seriously endangered by something, I think it’s incumbent upon us to stand up for ourselves.”

Like many reporters, Bassett said she had “never really had to pay attention to the financial side of journalism.”

But “after getting laid off, I started to become really interested in why all of these amazing news publishers were sort of going under, having to lay off staff, why we were losing local newspapers. It’s a tragedy, it’s really bad for democracy.”

Their effort comes at a time of increased scrutiny of the tech industry on the part of the federal government as well as Congress as public concern mounts over repeated privacy scandals, technology companies’ role in spreading misinformation, and their dominance over certain industries. The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission reportedly made a deal to divide potential antitrust investigations between them; Apple and Google will fall under the purview of the DOJ, while the FTC took Facebook and Amazon. The House Judiciary Committee announced it would “conduct a top-to-bottom review of the market power held by giant tech platforms.”

The Save Journalism Project’s founders are hoping to steer the public conversation around the negative effects of Big Tech towards its impact on journalism.

Stanton, who lives in New Orleans, mentioned examples like that city’s local paper, the Times-Picayune, which laid off its entire staff last month. Around the country, Stanton said, “local reporters are so overtaxed. They’re doing as good a job as they can but there’s not enough of them.”

At the moment, Stanton and Bassett are more focused on warning the public and the industry about the issue than on proposing solutions.

“I do think that everyone is starting to see a need to break up and regulate these companies or something along those lines,” Bassett said. “And with regards to how they’re going to make journalism viable again, I don’t frankly know…I think right now we’re starting with just getting this conversation out into the public and making people aware of exactly what’s going on. I do hope at some point we graduate into saying, ‘here’s a list of policy proposals, here’s exactly what needs to happen.'”

Stanton and Bassett plan to interview elected officials, candidates and colleagues in the media about the industry’s crisis, and started with conducting on-camera interviews with Reps. Mark DeSaulnier and Ruben Gallego. They plan to circulate a letter with which media companies can sign on to their cause. And their first official event will be at the annual Congressional Baseball Game, where they plan to distribute a physical newspaper laying out the problems on their agenda.

“The DC press corps is a really powerful constituency within our industry,” Stanton said. “If we can get our colleagues [there] to start talking about this it will help more broadly.”

Jonas Brothers Make History

“Boom. The world’s most famous brothers are back.” Vogue

 “The Jo Bros may not quite be in the year 3000, but “Sucker” nonetheless serves up a grown-up vision of The Jonas Brothers we didn’t know we were expecting.” NPR

“It’s 2019 and there’s a new Jonas Brothers song, and those two things go together a lot better than we ever anticipated.” Billboard

“The Jonas Brothers feel grown up without losing their boy band charm.” Esquire

Those are just the few responses to The Jonas Brothers recent comeback with their music video to “Sucker.”

This week, GRAMMY® Award-nominated multi-platinum powerhouse trio — the Jonas Brothers —reclaim their place at the top of the charts and popular culture with their new single and music video “Sucker.Get it HERE via Republic Records.

Taking the world by storm, it captures #1 on Apple Music, #1 on Spotify, and #1 on iTunes in North America.  Globally, it clinches #1 on Apple Music, #1 on YouTube, #1 on Twitter, and #2 on Spotify. Since its release, it scored over 20 million Spotify streams and is over 50 million YouTube views and counting.  At radio, it emerges as the “#1 Greatest Gainer for Top 40impacting now.

Not to mention, “Sucker” garnered unanimous critical acclaim. Among widespread praise, it was dubbed “an absolute jam” by Billboard, christened “a banger” by Esquire, described as “an impeccably sweet-and-sour pop rock-tune” by Rolling Stone, and best noted as “a grown-up vision of The Jonas Brothers we didn’t know we were expecting” by NPR.

To celebrate the release, the band took over New York City for an intimate and packed secret reunion show. It marked their first time on stage in nearly six years, and they returned with a historic gig that left fans clamoring for more.

Yesterday, the Jonas Brothers announced a partnership with Amazon StudiosPhilymack, and Federal Films– a division of Republic Records, to release an upcoming documentary about the Jonas Brothers, to premiere exclusively on Amazon Prime Video in more than 200 countries and territories.

Anthony Mandler’s director’s cut of the Sucker music video was also released. Watch HERE.

This week, they continue their takeover of The Late Late Show with James Corden. This late-night “residency” spanned everything from their first on-camera interview to a hilarious skit where the host kidnapped the band and reunited them with help from none other than Dr. Phil. You have to see it to believe it. However, there’s more to come.

Watch clips from last night’s episode HERE, and be sure to tune in for more this week.

Jonas Brothers are back and about to have their biggest year yet.

The preeminent male group of this century, Jonas Brothers opened the floodgates for a new era of titans in pop music. They earned three consecutive number one albums and sold out shows throughout three continents. Selling over 17 million-plus albums with over 1 billion streams worldwide, they’ve achieved dozens of platinum and gold certifications. Jonas Brothers notably received a GRAMMY® Award nomination in the category of “Best New Artist,” garnered “Breakthrough Artist” at the American Music Awards, won Billboard’s “Eventful Fans’” Choice Award for “Best Concert Tour of the Year, and took home a Mexican Grammy, showcasing their international influence. The tremendous success of the band provided a launch pad for the successful and storied solo careers of Nick JonasJoe Jonas, and Kevin Jonas, who have kept loyal fans yearning for a reunion, until now.

Want to follow the boys? Below are their social medias to keep yourself updated.

 

Te Bote 2

Five of the most influential urban artists of the genre, plus the sensual and unequaled touch of “The Diva of the Bronx” in Jennifer Lopez, give a new “flavor” to one of the most listened to songs of 2018.

“Te Bote 2,” produced by the young Puerto Rican, Young Martino, is a new version of the original song “Te Bote,” which swept downloads on all digital platforms in 2018. In addition, it became the most reproduced from YouTube worldwide this year and now has its “sequel”, a Spanglish style mix, which aims to position the issue in the Anglo-Saxon market.

“La Diva del Bronx” is in charge of giving the single the feminine, sensual, and international touch, making a participation in the song with a letter completely in English, without leaving aside its distinctive Latin flavor. On the other hand, Casper Mágico, Nio García, Wisin, Yandel and Cosculluela contribute a new letter in Spanish, combining the best of Trap and Reggaetón in a musical piece that reaches to 7 minutes.

“Te Bote 2” has its official video in the hands of the renowned director Fernando Lugo. It is now available on YouTube. Check it out here!

The theme is destined to become the new urban anthem of the year 2019, thanks to the “explosive combination” of its performers who invite us to enjoy a good rumba in both English and Spanish.

 

Cadillac CTS-V

By Vaughn Lowery x Reid Urban x Anthony Sovinsky

Cadillac is widely known for being America’s premier luxury vehicle. As for most luxury vehicles, it is focused on a classy, curb-appealing design with a comfort-oriented ride and top of the line technology. As a result, then appeared the 2004 debut of the Cadillac CTS-V, continuing to meet all the previous high-end expectations with some Olympic level athleticism.

The upgraded 2004 CTS-V inherited the Corvette’s 400-hp 5.7 liter V-8 engine and offered it only in a 6-speed manual, which is a unique addition to a unique consumer: the sports car enthusiast. This was a historical step for Cadillac as they now entered the luxury sport sedan realm with the likes of the BMW M5 and the Mercedes E63 AMG. What better way to make a statement than to be featured in one of the best adrenaline pumping car chase scenes of that time as seen in the 2004 movie The Matrix Reloaded.

Fast forward to its second best debut in 2009, which engraved Cadillac in the record books by setting a lap time of 7:59.32 at the Nurburgring for fastest production sedan. This was achieved with a 556hp supercharged 6.2 liter V8, enhanced handling due to the introduction of magnetic ride control, and brembo brakes on all four corners. This catapulted the CTS-V to the top of the ranks of the sport sedan class in performance,  beating the M5 and E63 AMG respectively from zero to 60 mph. 

PRESENT TIME 

The CTS-V will continue its reign in the high performance sport sedan category with the introduction of the astounding new and approved 2019 Cadillac CTS-V.

The front-end greets you with very sharp fighter-jet like lines matched with mesh grills and vents. It is clear the intent of the vehicle is to be as aerodynamic and performance-centric as possible. It features a carbon fiber splitter to redirect wind-drag to down force and keep the vehicle firmly planted for increased traction at higher speeds. The hood is also finished in carbon fiber with functional vents strategically placed to perform a variety of roles including: cooling of the high revving power plant, increased aerodynamics, and a slight weight reduction compared to its stock counterpart.

Moving to the rear of the vehicle, the side profile is reminiscent of a base model CTS until you spot the 19-inch forged premium painted alloy wheels wrapped in sticky Michelin Pilot Super Sport Summer-only low profile tires. Peering through the light weight forged alloy wheels are gargantuan racing-inspired six-piston front, four-piston rear, fixed caliper Brembo performance brakes with vented rotors that remind you to not forget the V. Moreover. The rear features a carbon fiber spoiler and rear diffuser accompanied by sport badging and quad pipes that announce top of the line engineering. The aggressiveness of the body suits the power in perfect synergism.

The various performance aesthetics are functional for two reasons: compliment the driver and compliment the engine. Let’s start with the engine. The boisterous opulent sedan is blessed to be a part of an incredible gene pool that continues to be one of the fittest on the road. Well-endowed with a supercharged 6.2L V8 producing 640 horsepower and 630 pound-feet of torque, it plans to be catapulted by this ostentatious hotrod from 0-60 in 3.7 seconds. The horses are put down to the road with an 8-speed automatic transmission available in several drive modes: from the least powerful but still faster than your Eco Mode, to the keep-both-hands-on-the-wheel Track Option. Track mode will tighten the suspension and open all of the cylinders for more power while the transmission will hold gears and have quicker shifts for increased acceleration.

Suspension has been one of the major highlights of the CTS-V since 2009 with the introduction of magnetic ride control. It’s an important feature that reads the road up to one thousand times a second, allowing for incredibly sharp responses from driver input at the wheel. Supplementing “Mag Ride” are multilink MacPherson struts with independent front-and-rear suspension connected to a light-weight stiffened chassis. Such handling technology is especially important to expand the confidence the driver has on and off-track with a vehicle exhibiting as much power, size, and precision as this one embodies.

Interior finishing further address the performance capabilities, as it is fitted with Recaro racing seats up front that are tastefully badged with the V-series logo. Designed for a glove-tight fit for both driver and passenger, the racing-inspired seats keep you firmly situated to resist lateral G forces while hauling through twist and turns through your favorite canyons. However, also comfortable enough to endure a lengthy road trip or frequenting your executive meetings at the office. Rear seats comfortably sit three full-sized adults allowing for a total of four in tow. Don’t worry! It will take more weight than a cabin full of people to slow this bad boy down. The infotainment system is equally accessible to both passenger and driver for ease of use. Simple and straight forward, controls are all touch sensitive as to make the dash sleek and non-distracting. Additionally, the souped-up caddy is laced with some cool features including automatic window shades for more privacy, a digital rear view mirror that allows for more greater vision surrounding the vehicle, blind spot indicators, and Apple Carplay that is compatible with Siri for ease of use and hands-free connectivity with your super car.

Base models for the CTS-V are priced just at $86,995, which is a great value per dollar of horsepower you receive comparatively to other vehicles in its class. Not only that but you have the option to deck it out and become a real show-stopper with carbon fiber and Recaro seat package, which will put you over the 100k mark with a price tag of $106,000. All-in-all, the 2019 Cadillac CTS-V is one of the best performance sport sedans in the world and deserves a spot in your garage.

360, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery,

360, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery,

Jesse Palter-The Paper Trail

Detroit born, LA based, prolific singer/songwriter Jesse Palter releases debut EP The Paper Trail October 22 on Artistry Music, featuring five tracks of aggressive, piano-pounding pop/rock in the vein of Carole King, Sarah McLachlan and Sara Bareilles. The first single going to radio is “Heavy Is The Crown,” an edgy, incisive pop-rocker examining narcisscism and victim-hood at is best.  Check it out here.

Comments Palter: “All of these songs are paving the way towards establishing myself as an artist and songwriter. My approach throughout this project was to find a way to capture a full snapshot of my life and what I’ve been going through. This is the beginning of what I hope will be a long, fulfilling journey.”

Palter, who launched her career in Detroit and Chicago before moving to Los Angeles to focus on her development as a pop artist, was supported in her sound and overall vision by producer Doug Petty, a veteran keyboardist who has worked with Celine Dion, Britney Spears, Nick Lachey and Lisa Loeb, among others. Petty kept the integrity of Palter’s songs from demo stage through the various layers and textures brought forth to compliment her unique artistry. A high caliber of studio musicians played on the project including bassists Tim Lefebvre and Alex Al and drummers Matt Chamberlain and Aaron Sterling.

With The Paper Trail EP, Palter has committed herself to the discipline of perfecting the craft of songwriting. She focused on strengthening her creative muscles to discover what melodies, lyrics and chord changes work best, allowing herself to be vulnerable, brave and brutally honest at the same time. The songs are autobiographical, representing her life and what’s she’s been through.

Palter launched her jazz career as a teenager, performing oboe and trumpet in the school jazz band. She connected with singer/songwriter Andrew Gold (“Thank You For Being A Friend”), who brought her to Nashville to work on original material and record a demo, which generated interest with several major labels. At 15, she began working with the Grammy-winning production team the Bass Brothers (Eminem). Her skill for improvisational singing and a developing passion for legendary jazz vocalists, led to her shift towards jazz. She studied at the University Of Michigan as a jazz and contemplative studies major.

Her eclectic musical upbringing includes exposure to a wide array of music that inspired her to deeply respect the art of great songs and songwriters, from Carole King and Joni Mitchell, to Prince, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson and The Beatles. Music and singing was always in her blood. Her grandmother, Doris Raynor, was once an opera prodigy in NY.

In early 2019, Artistry Music will follow up The Paper Trail EP with the single “Sever The Ties” and a full-length debut album.