Posts tagged with "American heart association"

Damaged Hearts rewired

Thin, flexible fibers made of carbon nanotubes  have now proven able to bridge damaged heart tissues and deliver the electrical signals needed to keep those hearts beating.

At Texas Heart Institute (THI) report they have used biocompatible fibers invented at Rice University in studies that showed sewing them directly into damaged tissue can restore electrical function to hearts.

“Instead of shocking and defibrillating, we are actually correcting diseased conduction of the largest major pumping chamber of the heart by creating a bridge to bypass and conduct over a scarred area of a damaged heart,” said Dr. Mehdi Razavi, a cardiologist and director of Electrophysiology Clinical Research and Innovations at THI, who co-led the study with Rice chemical and biomolecular engineer Matteo Pasquali.

“Today there is no technology that treats the underlying cause of the No. 1 cause of sudden death, ventricular arrhythmias,” Razavi said. “These arrhythmias are caused by the disorganized firing of impulses from the heart’s lower chambers and are challenging to treat in patients after a heart attack or with scarred heart tissue due to such other conditions as congestive heart failure or dilated cardiomyopathy.”

Results of the studies on preclinical models appear as an open-access Editor’s Pick in the American Heart Association’s Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. The association helped fund the research with a 2015 grant. The research springs from the pioneering 2013 invention by Pasquali’s lab of a method to make conductive fibers out of carbon nanotubes. The lab’s first threadlike fibers were a quarter of the width of a human hair, but contained tens of millions of microscopic nanotubes. The fibers are also being studied for electrical interfaces with the brain, for use in cochlear implants, as flexible antennas and for automotive and aerospace applications.

The experiments showed the nontoxic, polymer-coated fibers, with their ends stripped to serve as electrodes, were effective in restoring function during monthlong tests in large preclinical models as well as rodents, whether the initial conduction was slowed, severed or blocked, according to the researchers. The fibers served their purpose with or without the presence of a pacemaker, they found.

In the rodents, they wrote, conduction disappeared when the fibers were removed. “The reestablishment of cardiac conduction with carbon nanotube fibers has the potential to revolutionize therapy for cardiac electrical disturbances, one of the most common causes of death in the United States,” said co-lead author Mark McCauley, who carried out many of the experiments as a postdoctoral fellow at THI. He is now an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

“Our experiments provided the first scientific support for using a synthetic material-based treatment rather than a drug to treat the leading cause of sudden death in the U.S. and many developing countries around the world,” Razavi added. Many questions remain before the procedure can move toward human testing, Pasquali said. The researchers must establish a way to sew the fibers in place using a minimally invasive catheter, and make sure the fibers are strong and flexible enough to serve a constantly beating heart over the long term. He said they must also determine how long and wide fibers should be, precisely how much electricity they need to carry and how they would perform in the growing hearts of young patients.

“Flexibility is important because the heart is continuously pulsating and moving, so anything that’s attached to the heart’s surface is going to be deformed and flexed,” said Pasquali, who has appointments at Rice’s Brown School of Engineering and Wiess School of Natural Sciences.

“Good interfacial contact is also critical to pick up and deliver the electrical signal,” he said. “In the past, multiple materials had to be combined to attain both electrical conductivity and effective contacts. These fibers have both properties built in by design, which greatly simplifies device construction and lowers risks of long-term failure due to delamination of multiple layers or coatings.” Razavi noted that while there are many effective antiarrhythmic drugs available, they are often contraindicated in patients after a heart attack. “What is really needed therapeutically is to increase conduction,” he said. “Carbon nanotube fibers have the conductive properties of metal but are flexible enough to allow us to navigate and deliver energy to a very specific area of a delicate, damaged heart.” Rice alumna Flavia Vitale, now an assistant professor of neurology and of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Pennsylvania, and Stephen Yan, a graduate student at Rice, are co-lead authors of the paper.

Co-authors are Colin Young and Julia Coco of Rice; Brian Greet of THI and Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center; Marco Orecchioni and Lucia Delogu of the Città della Speranza Pediatric Research Institute, Padua, Italy; Abdelmotagaly Elgalad, Mathews John, Doris Taylor and Luiz Sampaio, all of THI; and Srikanth Perike of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Pasquali is the A.J. Hartsook Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, a professor of materials science and nanoengineering and of chemistry.

The American Heart Association, the Welch Foundation, the Air Force. Office of Scientific Research, the National Institutes of Health and Louis Magne supported the research.

Credit James Philpot/Texas Heart Institute

National Drink Wine Day

Cheers! Celebrate National Drink Wine Day by Helping Your Heart, Gut, and Brain

Rosé Piscine, a rosé wine specifically made to drink over ice, serves up some of the health benefits the drink offers
February 18th is National Drink Wine Day, which is a day each year that celebrates the love and health benefits associated with wine. According to the consulting group BW 166, wine sales in the U.S. topped $72.2 billion in 2018, which was nearly a 5 percent increase over the prior year. Clearly, we are nation that loves a good glass of wine, and the more we learn of the health benefits, the more likely more of us will add a bottle to our grocery list.
“People were enjoying a good glass of wine long before the research showed that there are health benefits,” explains Ken Lang, managing partner at Rosé Piscine, a rosé wine specifically made to drink over ice. “Now we can enjoy our glass of wine and feel good about what it is doing for our body, too. Rarely do we find something that we enjoy so much that also provides health benefits.”
Wine enthusiasts can rejoice as they celebrate National Drink Wine Day this year, because the drink has plenty of research pointing to the fact that it’s a healthy beverage to drink in moderation. What exactly is moderation? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), moderate drinking is up to one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men. One drink is defined as being four ounces of wine. Further, they recommend that number is not the average consumed over a week, but the amount consumed on any given day.
Most people who enjoy having a glass of wine with their meal love the taste, but they may not be aware of the way it’s helping their body. Here are some of the many health benefits that have been associated with making wine a part of your diet:

  • Heart health The National Institutes of Health reports that studies have shown that adults who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol may be less likely to develop heart disease than those who do not drink at all or are heavy drinkers.
  • Gut health The April 2017 issue of the journal Current Opinion in Biotechnology included the research results of a study on the health benefits of fermented foods, including wine. The study found that fermented foods, including wine, provide health benefits well beyond the starting food materials, and contain living microorganisms of which some are genetically similar to strains used as probiotics.
  • Diabetes health The April 2017 issue of the journal Endocrine reports that the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend a Mediterranean diet for improving glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. It also reports that studies show that higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a 20-23 % reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Mediterranean diet is one that includes drinking wine in moderation.
  • Brain health Research out of the University of Rochester Medical Center in 2018 found that drinking wine in moderation was associated with reducing inflammation and helping the brain to clear away toxins, including those that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

“From the brain to gut to your heart, drinking a little wine has health benefits for most people,” added Helppie. “It’s nice to feel good about what you are drinking, whether with dinner, at a party, or at the beach. You can drink some wine and know you are doing your body good.”
Rosé Piscine, a wine that has sold millions of bottles in France and Brazil, recently became available for sale in the United States. Uniquely, it is a wine that has been created to be served over ice. Rosé Piscine is made by Pascal Nacenta in southwest France. The French rosé is 100 percent destemmed, fermented for 20 days with cold stabilization at 60 degrees and then filtered. The final product emerges from stainless steel tanks, offering a floral aroma of white flowers and rose and an exotic fruits finish. Rosé Piscine can be purchased at select stores around the country and online. To find a store near you or to order online, visit the site.

About Rosé Piscine
A unique wine in that it has been created to be served over ice, Rosé Piscine is taking the nation by storm. Over two million bottles of it have already been sold in France and Brazil, and it is now available in the U.S. Rosé Piscine is pale salmon in color, light to medium in body wine and is made from Négrette, a locally indigenous varietal known for its powerful aromatic qualities. For more information on Rosé Piscine or the company, visit the site.

TOYOTA SUPRA

Sports car enthusiasts have been waiting more than 20 years for the return of Supra and will soon be able to purchase the 2020 Toyota GR Supra for a Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price of $49,990.

For those fans and collectors anxious to be among the first owners of this iconic sports car, the initial 1,500 production Supras for the U.S. will be Launch Edition models starting at $55,250. Each will be uniquely numbered and have distinctive features signifying the exclusivity and excitement of Supra’s return. Toyota dealers will be handling all orders and the Launch Edition models go on sale in Summer 2019 starting at $55,250.

The Supra Launch Edition will be available in exterior colors of Absolute Zero White, Nocturnal Black or Renaissance Red 2.0, each featuring high-contrast red mirror caps and 19-inch forged matte black alloy wheels.

The Absolute Zero White and Nocturnal Black Supra Launch Editions will have a red interior. Each of the racing-inspired seats will be wrapped in red leather, with red leather steering wheel grips, and a red center console with carbon-fiber accents.

The Renaissance Red 2.0 Supra Launch Edition will feature a black leather-trimmed interior, with black seats, a black steering wheel, and black center console. The black interior will also feature carbon-fiber accents.

The first 1,500 Supras will feature an individually numbered carbon-fiber badge on the passenger-side dashboard complete with a graphic of Toyota Motor Corporation President and Master Driver Akio Toyoda’s signature.

Different Grades, Same Power

The 2020 Supra will be available in two grades: 3.0 and 3.0 Premium. Both will be powered by a 3.0-liter turbocharged inline six-cylinder engine that produces 335 hp and 365 lb-ft of torque and is mated to an 8-speed automatic transmission with racing-style paddle shifters. Both grades will also come standard with serious performance features including adaptive suspension, an active rear differential and launch control.

The 3.0 grade has a 6.5-inch display with Bluetooth and iPod capability, as well as Alcantara seats. Navigation and JBL Audio will be an available option for an additional $2,460.

The 3.0 Premium grade will feature an upgraded 8.8-inch wide-format touchscreen display with Navigation, Supra Connect telematics services, wireless Apple CarPlay, a premium 12-speaker JBL audio system, wireless phone charging and a color Head-Up Display. The 3.0 Premium grade will also feature heated, leather-trimmed seats.

The Supra Launch Edition will be based on the 3.0 Premium grade.

Standard safety features on both grades, as well as the Launch Edition, include forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, lane departure warning, road sign assist and automatic high beams.

The Driver Assist Package is an additional suite of safety features that will be optional on both grades for an additional $1,195. It includes full speed adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitor, rear cross traffic alert, parking sonar and rear collision warning.

The Very First One

The first production 2020 Toyota GR Supra to roll off the assembly line, “Global #1,” was auctioned for charity this evening for $2.1 million at the 48th Annual Barrett-Jackson Auction at WestWorld of Scottsdale. All proceeds of the fifth-generation GR Supra, which made its world debut on January 14, 2019 during the 2019 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, went to support the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Bob Woodruff Foundation (BWF).

Check out this video on the new Toyota Supra.

Watch this video to see how Toyota is not screwing up the new Supra.

MACY’S × AHA’S GO RED FOR WOMEN

MACY’S GIVES FROM THE HEART THIS FEBRUARY FOR AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION’S GO RED FOR WOMEN™

Since 2004, Macy’s has raised $65 million to support Go Red For Women in the prevention of heart disease in women.

 

Macy’s unites customers and associates this February for American Heart Month in support of American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement. As the founding national sponsor of Go Red For Women, Macy’s has helped in the prevention of heart disease by raising $65 million since 2004. Fortunately, 80 percent of cardiac events may be prevented with education and lifestyle changes, according to the American Heart Association. This year, Macy’s will continue to offer limited-edition merchandise and promotions to benefit Go Red For Women, helping to fund lifesaving research and awareness that adds more time to women’s lives.

 

Wear Red Sale at Macy’s

Macy’s encourages customers and associates to participate in the Wear Red Sale in-store from Wednesday, Jan. 31 to Monday, Feb. 5, with a pre-sale beginning on Sunday, Jan. 28. Customers can wear red or purchase the official Red Dress pin for $3 to receive 25 percent off a great selection of items storewide, plus an extra 15 or 10 percent off select departments. Exclusions and restrictions apply. One hundred percent of the pin sales will benefit Go Red For Women.

New this year, customers will receive an additional pin to share with a loved one to help spread awareness of the cause. Macy’s associates are invited to wear red in-store to create further awareness of the pin sale and celebrate National Wear Red Day on Feb. 2.

Additionally, Macy’s will invite customers to round up their in-store purchase to the nearest dollar (up to $.99) and donate their change to Go Red For Women from Tuesday, Feb. 6, through Feb. 28.

 

Merchandise That Gives Back

Throughout the month of February, Macy’s will offer exclusive products in stores and online to benefit Go Red For Women. This year, two limited-edition red dresses by Calvin Klein ($134) and Thalia Sodi ($99.50) as well as a specialty t-shirt from Thalia Sodi ($29.50) will give back to the cause. From Feb. 1 through Feb. 28, 10 percent of the purchase price from these limited-edition items will be donated to Go Red For Women.

“As the national founding sponsor of Go Red For Women, Macy’s remains committed to the fight against heart disease in women by raising more than $65 million since 2004,” said Holly Thomas, group vice president of cause marketing at Macy’s. “This cause is near and dear to our hearts, affecting customers and associates in our local communities. By providing different ways for our customers to give back, together we are helping women of all ages and backgrounds live longer, healthier lives.”

 

Go Red For Women Luncheons

Raising additional funds for the cause, Go Red For Women Luncheons will take place in 188 cities across the country. Each luncheon guest will receive a $10 Macy’s gift card and hear from captivating guest speakers. At select luncheons, attendees will have an opportunity to win a $250 Macy’s gift card.

“The American Heart Association is grateful for Macy’s longtime commitment to the Go Red For Women movement, and to ending heart disease and stroke in women. Now, more than ever, Macy’s work with AHA is critically important as cardiovascular diseases claim the life of a woman about every 80 seconds. Every dollar raised helps fund lifesaving research and awareness that adds more time to women’s lives,” said James Postl, American Heart Association chairman of the national board of directors. “This year, we are encouraging women to take action by making a Go Red Commitment. By doing so, women everywhere are standing with us, with Macy’s – together – to further the fight for women’s heart health.”

 

The American Heart Association’s® Go Red For Women® Red Dress Collection,™ presented by Macy’s

As the presenting sponsor of the American Heart Association’s® Go Red For Women® Red Dress Collection™, Macy’s helps shine a spotlight on the issue of heart disease in women. The Red Dress Collection has kicked off New York Fashion Week since 2003 and will be staged this year on Thursday, Feb. 8 at 8 p.m. at The Hammerstein Ballroom in New York City. The star-studded event will feature strong and inspiring female celebrities walking the runway to showcase emerging and established designers. Three of the red dresses featured on the runway will be created by designers in fashion incubator programs, which are housed at Macy’s locations and develop the next generation of fashion trendsetters. The designers-in-residence featured are Dur Doux from DC Fashion Incubator, Lia Larrea from Fashion Incubator San Francisco and Tanesha Prunty from Chicago Fashion Incubator.

For more information about Macy’s programs to support Go Red For Women, visit macys.com/GoRed.

 

About Macy’s

Macy’s, the largest retail brand of Macy’s, Inc. delivers fashion and affordable luxury to customers at approximately 670 locations in 45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam, as well as to customers in the U.S. and more than 100 international destinations through its leading online store at macys.com. Via its stores, e-commerce site, mobile and social platforms, Macy’s offers distinctive assortments including the most desired family of exclusive and fashion brands for him, her and home. Macy’s is known for such epic events as Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks and the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, as well as spectacular fashion shows, culinary events, flower shows and celebrity appearances. Macy’s flagship stores – including Herald Square in New York City, Union Square in San Francisco, State Street in Chicago, and Dadeland in Miami and South Coast Plaza in southern California – are known internationally and are leading destinations for visitors. Building on a more than 150-year tradition, and with the collective support of customers and employees, Macy’s helps strengthen communities by supporting local and national charities giving more than $54 million each year, plus 180,000 hours of volunteer service, to help make a difference in the lives of our customers.

About Go Red For Women

In the United States, cardiovascular diseases kill approximately 1 in 3 women each year. Go Red For Women is the American Heart Association’s national movement to end heart disease and stroke in women. Cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. kill approximately one woman every 80 seconds. The good news is that 80 percent of cardiac events may be prevented with education and lifestyle changes. Go Red For Women advocates for more research and swifter action for women’s heart health. The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement is nationally sponsored by Macy’s and CVS Health, with additional support from our cause supporters. For more information, please visit GoRedForWomen.org or call 1-888-MY-HEART (1-888-694-3278).