Posts tagged with "album"

Jeremy Zucker “comethru” Remix

Today, Brooklyn-based singer, songwriter and producer Jeremy Zucker releases a remix of his breakout hit “comethru” featuring Bea Miller. Listen HERE!

“comethru,” taken from Jeremy’s latest EP summer, has an impressive 66 million streams on Spotify, and its video has over 24 million views to date and is featured on YouTube’s “Artist On The Rise” Trending Tab. On working with Bea to bring this remix to life, Jeremy says, “It’s been amazing to see how well this song has been received. I wanted to do something exciting for my fans and give it a new spin. I’ve been a fan of Bea for long time and thought she’d be the perfect addition the song. We got together a couple of weeks ago to make this remix, and I’m psyched about the way it came out.”

Recently returning from a sold out European and UK headline tour, fans can expect new music from Jeremy this spring.

Growing up in suburban New Jersey, 23-year-old singer, songwriter and producer Jeremy Zucker has always been surrounded by music. In 2015, he released his EP breathe as a freshman at Colorado College pursuing a degree in Molecular Biology. He cranked out songs in his dorm room and released them over Soundcloud—one every week. He later transferred them over to Spotify, where breathe’s lead single “Bout It” became the catalyst, hitting Spotify’s Discover Weekly playlist. Following the massive streaming success of his 2017 single “talk is overrated” featuring blackbear, 2018’s intensely personal EP glisten delivered the groundbreaking song “all the kids are depressed,” the first widespread glimpse into Zucker’s songwriting ethos. The track has over 56 million Spotify streams to date and its powerful video, directed by Drew Kirsch (Felix Jaehn, blackbear, Louis the Child, Quinn XCII), has over 7 million views to date. Last May, he graduated from Colorado College and put his degree aside to finally pursue his dream of making music, which resulted in his latest EP, summer,. As Zucker enters this next phase of his career, he brings a new love letter to life that fans will undoubtedly connect with.

Kevin Garrett Announces North American Tour

Pittsburgh-born and GRAMMY® Award-nominated artist, multi-instrumentalist, and producer Kevin Garrett announces an 18 city headlining North American tour. The run will kick off on April 30th in Philadelphia, PA at The Foundry and wrap on May 31st in Atlanta, GA at Vinyl ATL. Full tour routing below and tickets are on-sale today HERE!

In conjunction with the tour announce, Kevin also drops track “Running From.” The song is the last to be released prior to the release of his debut album HOAX, out next Friday, March 22nd via AWAL. The album is available for pre-order HERE! 

BUY/ STREAM “RUNNING FROM”

Kevin said about the song, “My friend Sean made the initial track with which I wrote this song. Running From at face value is about being taken advantage of, but it’s more an inward reflection on why we back off from time to time and how we hold back with walls we don’t even know we’re building.

Kevin introduced HOAX with the stark and simmering 2018 release of his single In Case I Don’t Feel. Backed by delicately plucked acoustic guitar and plaintive piano, he relays an unfiltered message. He has also recently unveiled tracks “Faith You Might” and “Don’t Rush.”

UNDISPUTED Episode 2 “The Trenches”

TJ Porter escaped the trenches of Harlem and transformed his life from a top high school basketball prospect to a star rapper who is about to break out in a major way. In episode 2 of UNDISPUTED, TJ tells his story of pain and triumph while proving that he’s truly next up. Def Jam’s UNDISPUTED album is out now.

Juice WRLD “Death Race For Love” Album

Chicago artist Juice WRLD has released his second studio album Death Race For Love, out now on Grade A Productions/ Interscope Records. Death Race For Love includes the single “Robbery,” released February 13, which debuted at #27 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and peaked at #2 on the Soundcloud chart. “Robbery” accumulated over 21 million global streams in its first week of release, and the accompanying Cole Bennet music video has over 26 million views. The album also features the single “Hear Me Calling,” which hit 6.7 million global streams within the first 3 days of its release.

Death Race for Love arrives as the follow-up to Goodbye & Good Riddance, Juice WRLD’s massively successful 2018 debut. Along with his double-platinum single “All Girls Are the Same,” the platinum-certified album features his biggest hit to date: the four-times-platinum “Lucid Dreams,” which earned over a billion total video and audio streams last year. In addition, Goodbye & Good Riddance includes Juice WRLD’s chart-climbing single “Armed and Dangerous.”

Juice WRLD will be performing at this year’s Coachella festival. He will then begin his headlining North American tour on April 25 at the PNE Forum in Vancouver, BC and wrap the tour June 8 at The Bomb Factory in Dallas, TX, with support from Ski Mask The Slump God and The Lyrical Lemonade All-Stars. Tickets are available here, along with a limited run of exclusive merch collaborations, with VLONE, Lyrical Lemonade, Half Evil, and Ransom.

Born Jarad Higgins, Juice WRLD got his start by shunning major streaming services and building a major following on Soundcloud. Within weeks of the February 2018 premiere of his video for “All Girls Are the Same,” he scored a deal with Interscope Records. Soon after the signing, Juice WRLD made his debut with Goodbye & Good Riddance and drew critical acclaim from the likes of the New York Times (who called it “one of the year’s most effective hip-hop releases”.) Juice WRLD also completed his sold-out debut headlining tour of North America in 2018 and is set to do the same again this year’s tour.

BOOGIE × EMINEM

Boogie drops video for “Rainy Days” featuring Eminem off debut album Everything’s For Sale. 

 

 

 

WATCH HERE

 

 

For more information on Boogie, visit:

 

https://www.facebook.com/WS.Boogie/

https://twitter.com/ws_boogie

https://www.instagram.com/ws_boogie/

https://soundcloud.com/boogieofficial

blackbear Releases “1 SIDED LOVE”

 blackbear releases a new single — “1 SIDED LOVE” — today via all digital retailers. An official video for the song is coming soon.

Listen to “1 SIDED LOVE” HERE

Written and produced by blackbear, Joe Kirkland (Dua Lipa), and Jurek, “1 SIDED LOVE” is the first track to be released from the singer, songwriter, and producer’s upcoming new album, ANONYMOUS, which will be released by Beartrap/Alamo/Interscope Records on April 26.

Blackbear ended 2018 with a sold-out show at the Palladium in Los Angeles. He spent much of last year in the studio working on ANONYMOUS, which follows 2017’s cybersex. Born Matthew Musto, blackbear put out three independent albums (2015’s Deadroses and Help and 2017’s digital druglord) prior to cybersex. In addition, he released a self-titled album with his hip-hop duo mansionz in early 2017. Featured on the certified Gold digital druglord, “do re mi” became blackbear’s first single to crack the Billboard Hot 100; the track has since gone double platinum. A remix of “do re mi” featuring Gucci Mane was released in July 2017, and reached No. 5 at Rhythmic and No. 26 at Top 40 radio. Meanwhile, its video has racked up more than 101 million views on YouTube. 

 

RAJA KUMARI

Indian-American rapper, singer, songwriter and dancer Raja Kumari is a force of nature. She’s a fearless, charismatic personality and natural-born storyteller whose mission is to create art that blends her Indian roots with her American upbringing. Her music is a sonic bridge between East and West that fuses the rhythms she absorbed as a trained classical Indian dancer with her love for hip-hop. Through singles “Mute,” “City Slums” (featuring Mumbai rapper Divine), “Believe In You,” and her latest “I Did It,”as well as her debut EP, The Come Up (the cover features an image of Kumari with her head draped in both a gold tikka and an American flag), Kumari announces that this is the new face of America. “I want my fans to feel one hundred percent seen and to have a safe space to be themselves,” she says. “Because those were the onlydesires I had as a child.”

Born Svetha Rao in Claremont, Calif., to Indian parents who emigrated to the U.S. in the ’70s, Kumari was 13 when she had a vision that she calls “a memory of the future.” “I was in my room and I had this image of me standing on a stage,” she recalls. “I couldn’t see myself. I was looking out from my own eyes at a sea of 100,000 people and I could feel their energy. Suddenly I snapped out of it and said out loud, ‘How do I get there?’ My entire career has been about trying to answer that question, ‘How do I become that woman and how do I touch people?’ That became my life’s purpose.” Her answer is music and dance. “I feel like I’m a seed from the motherland that was sent across the world,” she says. “Culture is part of my identity because we, as Indian-Americans who grew up away from India, have to be the vessels of culture. We have to hold on because it’ll be lost within one generation. That’s why it so heavily influences my music and look. It’s not a gimmick to me. It’s an expression of a lifetime of trying to preserve it.”

Kumari set upon her artistic journey at age five when she began learning classical Indian dance, spending seven hours a day practicing with a dance guru who lived with her family for 10 years. Kumari studied several styles and, at age seven, made her debut in front of an audience that included Indian music legend Ravi Shankar, who declared her a child prodigy. By the time she was ten, Kumari was touring the U.S. and India, performing for massive audiences and raising substantial sums of money for charity, including enough to build a meditation hall and a new wing for a hospital in India.

Kumari listened to nothing but classical Indian music until she was nine, but then her older brother gave her a copy of The Fugees’ The Score, and her love for hip-hop was born. “That was the genesis of me as an artist,” she says. “Indian music is based on the mathematics of rhythm, so very quickly, as a little Indian kid who was not using her brain to be scientist, I used it to decipher the mathematics of hip-hop and realized that the rhythms of rap felt similar to the jathis and taals of Carnatic music. Hip-hop felt like a bridge.” Kumari also noted the large platforms that her favorite pop acts, like Britney Spears and *NSYNC, had to reach fans. “I was like, ‘How do I get my dance on that type of stage?’ And I realized that the only people who have stages like that are pop stars.”

At 14, Kumari recorded her first song professionally, started a hip-hop duo with a friend, and adopted her stage name, which means “princess” in Sanskrit. “That’s when I personified this strong, female goddess character called ‘Raja Kumari,’ the daughter of the king, and the king was God. So in my mind, I was the daughter of God.” She began writing her own songs as an act of rebellion. “I felt that everybody was expecting me to continue dancing and,like every other good Indian girl, marry a doctor,” saysKumari, whose father is a radiation oncologist. “I felt this path being set up for me and music became my way of doing something that was just for me.”

Kumari developed her writing skills and spent every day instudio sessions and attending songwriting camps all over the world. As she tried to crack the music industry code, she realized that the artists she looked up to started out as songwriters. “They had to prove they could sell millions of records, so that became my focus, too,” she says. “I put my artist project aside for two years to concentrate on learning.” As she found herself in in rooms with such heavyweights as Timbaland, Polow Da Don, Tricky Stewart, J.R. Rotem, and, at one point, Dr. Dre, Kumari soaked up everything she could about writing and vocal production. Her first placement came in 2012 when a song she co-wrote called “Change Your Life” wound up on Iggy Azalea’s Grammy-nominated album The New Classic. “Suddenly, I had credibility,” Kumari says.

Kumari signed with Pulse Recordings and went on to co-write hit songs for Fall Out Boy (the 4x-Platinum “Centuries,” which earned her a 2015 BMI Pop Award), Fifth Harmony, Twin Shadow, Knife Party, Dirty South, Lindsey Stirling, and Gwen Stefani (Kumari co-wrote six tracks on Stefani’s most recent album, This Is What The Truth Feels Like). Ironically, it was seeing Iggy Azalea wearing a gold kiritam in her “Bounce” video that fueledKumari’s determination to introduce authentic Indian culture to the masses. “To see my culture being put on as a costume — it woke me up,” she says. “I realized that if I didn’t do it, no one will.” Along the way, Kumari earned a degree in comparative religious studies at the University of California, Riverside.

In 2015, Kumari signed to Epic Records and released her debut single “Mute,” which addressed the challenges she faced when people in the industry advised her to tone down her ethnicity. (In the song’s opening line, she declares: “I had to put ‘em on mute / Thought that the curry was soup / I had to feed these fools / Had to go home and regroup.”)Kumari felt she had hit a roadblock in America and decided to decamp to Mumbai, where she was based for two years.

“I got there and everybody understood me,” says Kumari, who is also signed to Sony Music India. “I didn’t have to explain my bindi. I didn’t have to explain anything, really. People were so open to everything I was doing as an artist.I just wanted to prove that my music is worthy and that there are people who want to hear it. The validation from my people made me no longer crave validation from anyone else. When I walk into a room and someone tells me something can’t happen, I don’t even listen, because I already know what’s possible.”

Kumari wrote her latest single, “I Did It,” about that feeling. “It’s about me taking a leap,” she says. “It’s about how I didn’t do it the way everyone wanted, but I did it with integrity and that can’t be taken away from me. No one can tell me it won’t work, because it is working. I feel that the music is unstoppable now and that’s such a crazy feeling, because even today, my dad will say, ‘You know, you can just go back to medical school.’ They are still waiting for me to take the emergency exit. But I don’t feel like I’m allowed to quit because there are too many people, little girls like me, who didn’t see themselves represented in culture, who need it. I didn’t have anybody like me. I feel like I’m becoming the person I needed when I was growing up.

ARIANA GRANDE × ‘THANK U, NEXT’ ALBUM

ARIANA GRANDE thank u, next ALBUM OUT NOW
LISTEN HERE: https://arianagrande.lnk.to/tun-albumPR
 
PREMIERES “break up with your girlfriend, i’m bored” MUSIC VIDEO
WATCH HERE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LH4Y1ZUUx2g

 

thank u, next Tracklisting:
1. imagine
2. needy
3. NASA
4. bloodline
5. fake smile
6. bad idea
7. make up
8. ghostin
9. in my head
10. 7 rings
11. thank u, next
12. break up with your girlfriend, i’m bored