Posts tagged with "age"

Joshua S. Yamamoto, M.D., F.A.C.C. ,You Can Prevent A Stroke, 360 MAGAZINE, author, book

World Stroke Day is Coming (Oct. 29th)

By: Joshua S. Yamamoto, M.D., F.A.C.C. (Author, You Can Prevent A Stroke)

The best way to treat a stroke is to prevent it.


Yes, You Can Prevent a Stroke, and remember, prevent is an active verb.


A stroke is damage to the brain from interrupted or inadequate blood. When we don’t get blood to the brain, it dies. Fundamentally, when we maintain adequate circulation to the brain, we prevent strokes.

Recognizing that our circulation naturally ages gives us the chance to be proactive in maintaining our health and preventing the otherwise inevitable changes that cause strokes.

Strokes are considered a “disease of aging.” This is true. But “aging” is much better understood than it once was. Aging is largely predictable. That makes it measurable and manageable. In fact, there is almost no such thing as cardiovascular disease, it’s mostly just natural aging.


Everyone ages, even Olympic athletes. No one is immune. We have 100,000 heart beats a day. That’s a lot of wear and tear. This internal aging is what leads to plaque build-up in arteries, increased strain and work in the heart, and the inevitability of less reliable and irregular heartbeats. These are the internal changes which cause strokes.


“Risk Factors” like diabetes, smoking, unfavorable lipids and higher blood pressure, are best thought of as things that accelerate natural aging. But there are two key things to remember: we are all dealt a genetic hand when we are born. We can not change the cards we are dealt, but we can choose how we play them. Secondly, time always passes.
The inevitable internal changes of aging do not produce symptoms before they lead to brain damage. That’s why we call heart and vascular disease the silent killer. It may be silent, but it is not invisible.


We can see it, long before it causes problems. But you need to look. No one knows their health on the inside until they look, but looking is easy and painless. We can use tools like ultrasound and extended cardiac monitoring. Once you know your health on the inside, then you can work with your doctor to actively prevent a stroke.


Our lifestyle choices and personal effort (that is, our diet and exercise) make a difference, but only to a point. Ultimately, genetics and time will matter more. If we want to prevent a stroke, think: “D-HART.”


Have a Doctor, and ask-


What is the health of my Heart (and how do we know)?


What is the health of my Arteries?


What is my heart’s Rate and Rhythm?


Is it Time to do something or start a medication?


Ask these questions so you can make informed decisions on how to navigate your own aging because, You Can Prevent a Stroke.

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

7 Ways To Make Your Face Look Younger

Everyone wants to live forever, but NO one wants to grow old. Well, at least no one wants to LOOK old! That paradox has been ingrained in most of us from the moment we feel the effects of aging!  It is a deep-rooted desire to fight the process of growing old tooth and nail. While it’s true that no one can stop maturing, there are ways that we can slow it down or at the very least look younger. Here are some suggestions.

1. You Are What You Eat

Or, you are what your body absorbs. If you are eating foods that are prohibiting you from absorbing needed nutrients, then that can most definitely be the culprit to looking older. That is why consuming a diet that is nutrient-dense is so important! Avoiding sugar is something you may also want to consider. A diet that is low in sugar keeps insulin levels low. It is important to understand that a consistent spike in insulin levels accelerates aging.

2. Sleep

It is no secret that the body needs sleep but not just any old sleep will do. Our bodies require six to eight hours of recuperative sleep every night. If we regularly deprive ourselves of that then we will begin to age faster, and it will show! If you are suffering from long-term sleep deprivation it is best that you find the root cause and resolve it because sleep is vital to our longevity.

3. Let’s Get Physical!

There is a reason why exercise is often advised when wanting to look younger. That’s because regular exercise dramatically slows the aging process in our chromosomes (thread-like structures housed in the nucleus of each cell). Our telomeres (caps placed at the end of chromosomes like shoelaces) controls aging. As we age, our telomeres become shorter. Regular exercise halts that process helping us maintain longer telomeres which are linked with a prolonged existence. Not to mention that exercise also relieves stress and anxiety which can take its toil and show on our faces prematurely aging us.

4. Water

Hydration is very important in maintaining our youthful appearance. Especially when you consider that the human adult body is 60% of water. Not only does water cool down the body but it also delivers nutrients to the cells and removes waste. Along with drinking water, you can also eat fruits and vegetables with high water content such as watermelon, grapefruit, and cucumber.

5. Protect Your Skin

The sun is a great source of Vitamin D which is necessary for our immune health and absorbing calcium, however, the sun also ages our skin due to its harmful ultraviolet (A and B) rays. These are the types of sun rays that reach the earth’s surface. UVB rays produce sunburn and are associated with the formation of most skin cancers. UVA rays are also the cause of some cancers in the skin. Finding a sunscreen with SPF 15 (at least) that protects against both rays is ideal, also wearing hats and using umbrellas will help.

6. Skin Care: Gel

Keeping in line with skin protection, there are products that can be used that can help with the skin’s appearance. If you are having difficulties with your skin texture or if you have scars, you can use natural solutions like aloe gel or coconut oil. These can be very effective in helping the skin to heal properly and natural. Also, a good scar gel will help.

7. Make-up

How you apply your make-up can make a significant difference in how young or old you appear. Advice on make-up tips can be found all over social media platforms such as Pinterest, Facebook, or YouTube. Be sure to incorporate good habits like removing your make-up and cleaning your face before going to bed and make sure that your make-up is not too old or unsanitary.

What is all comes down to is that, we have to live a healthy lifestyle. I know that we hear this advice over and over again to the point of it being a cliché; however, there is a reason why we hear it often; BECAUSE IT’S TRUE! There’s really no way around it. If we want to look youthful yet live as long as possible, we must develop good lifestyle habits. 

LEARNING + TRAVEL: THE SECRETS TO LONG LIFE?

New Survey Reveals Belief that Travel Plus a Passion for Learning are Key

We’ve all heard the theories that exercise, healthy diet and challenging mind games can help a person live longer with greater mental acuity, but it seems that travel (particularly travel with an educational focus) should be added to that list as well. Road Scholar, the nation’s non-profit leader in educational travel for Boomers and beyond, conducted an online national survey of more than 1,000 men and women, age 55 and older, and found that an overwhelming 85 percent of them believe travel actually can help extend their life. As for the main reason for travel, 43 percent said they travel to learn about other cultures and places. In fact, 26 percent described themselves as lifelong learners. In addition, a full 74 percent of respondents said travel was “important” or “very important” as a way to maintain mental acuity. Road Scholar was built on the belief that learning is the key to a longer and more fulfilled life, and a large number of their survey respondents seem to agree.

“We hear over and over how important learning, coupled with a travel component, is in the lives of Road Scholar participants, but it was fascinating to discover that so many of the people surveyed view travel and learning as synergistic, and the best way to learn about the world,” stated Road Scholar’s President and CEO, Jim Moses. “Road Scholar has always focused on learning, and our educational adventures combine the best of both education and travel.”

Of course, the findings also reflect a shift in current thinking about the role of learning in our lives, particularly as we age, noted Moses. “The concept of learning as an age-based activity for children and young adults is being replaced by a philosophy of the benefits of lifelong learning – an approach to learning that is not just school-based, but experiential, social and intellectual and continuing throughout the course of a person’s life. For many, travel is an ideal way to continue learning new things no matter their age,” he said.

“I definitely think that travel enhances and may contribute to longer life,” said Debbie S., a 65-year-old avid traveler who divides her time between Arlington TX and Presque Isle, WI. “It keeps your brain working. It’s also been proven that if you have passions that you tend to live longer.”

Maxine T., a 73-year-old woman from Walnut Creek, CA, agrees in the power of travel, saying “Each trip leaves us hungry for the next adventure so, I guess we’ll have to live a very long time. There sure is a lot of world to see!”

In addition to longevity, the survey asked respondents to list all the ways they keep their brains active and engaged and gave them a list of methods that included reading/book club, crossword puzzles, continuing education classes, travel, museum visits and attending lectures.

Travel was cited more frequently than any other category, by 69 percent of respondents. Reading and book clubs were a close second at 66 percent, followed by crossword puzzles at 49 percent and museum visits at 42 percent.  Continuing education and attending lectures were checked by 36 percent and 31 percent, respectively.

About Road Scholar

Road Scholar is the nation’s largest not-for-profit educational travel organization for adults – a true university of the world. It offers 5,500 programs in 150 countries and 50 states and financial aid for those who otherwise could not participate in its programs. Road Scholar educational adventures are created by Elderhostel, the world leader in educational travel since 1975. Learn more at roadscholar.org

Survey Methodology Details

This survey was conducted by Survata, an independent research firm in San Francisco. Survata interviewed 1000 online respondents between April 22, 2019 and April 28, 2019. Respondents were reached across the Survata publisher network, where they take a survey to unlock premium content, like articles and ebooks. Respondents received no cash compensation for their participation. More information on Survata’s methodology can be found at survata.com/methodology.

The Perfect Rx For You

Questions about your Health? Pharmacists Can Provide Your Perfect Rx     

Have you ever had a question about your health and wanted an answer in a quick and convenient manner? If the answer is yes, it turns out you are not alone. A majority of Americans nationwide routinely tap the expertise of pharmacists and online health-related websites.

In a survey of adults nationwide, Fairleigh Dickinson University’s School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Madison, New Jersey asked Americans about their use of pharmacists for information when they have a question about their health. Over half of all Americans consult with the pharmacist on duty when they visit a pharmacy (55%). A quarter (28%) do so routinely, with 27 percent who do so less often.

The survey finds that most speak with pharmacists only about prescription drug use, even though they can get other health related information from them. Two-thirds (65%) seek prescription drug counseling, with significantly fewer asking about over-the-counter drug usage and side effects, injectable vaccines and immunization delivery or medical devices (15% combined). Among those who do not regularly engage with pharmacists, a majority say they simply don’t need their assistance (66%).

“The fact that so many say they don’t need the assistance of a pharmacist speaks to the public’s unawareness of the pharmacist’s role in healthcare. Pharmacists are easily accessible and can provide reliable, patient-specific information tailored to the needs of the individual,” said Dr. Otito Iwuchukwu, an Assistant Professor at the School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.  “With pharmacists becoming increasingly relied upon as a source to receive healthcare services, more people will recognize the role of pharmacists and seek them out to meet their health-related needs in the coming years. Pharmacists routinely check for drug interactions, make medication recommendations to other healthcare providers and patients, provide medication counseling, ensure patients are taking their medications safely, assist in navigating insurance drug coverage or suggest a more affordable medication option, and immunize.”

According to national polls, pharmacists consistently remain among the most trusted and ethical healthcare professionals.

“The ability to access a pharmacist for the provision of medication information without an appointment at no cost and at any time gives credence to the value and positive role they play in helping everyone lead healthy lives,” said Barbara Rossi, Assistant Dean at FDU School of Pharmacy & Healthy Sciences.

Online sources

The same survey asked about whether and to what extent people trust online sources for health information. It turns out that sources such as WebMD, disease specific sites, and sites affiliated with medical centers provide somewhat of a mixed bag for Americans who use them. Around half (51%) use them overall, with women (54%) significantly more likely than men to visit a website (43%), and older Americans (60 and older) the least likely (11%). WebMD or other general purpose health websites attract the most visitors (40%), with hospital affiliated sources (20%), and other conditions or disease specific sources (15%) used less often. Despite widespread use, there’s some evidence that online sources bring with them some degree of skepticism.

Among those who use online sources with some regularity, their usefulness rates about a seven on a scale of one to ten, with ten indicating the highest degree of usefulness. When asked why they don’t go online for general health and symptom inquiries, a fifth (19%) say they avoid them because they don’t trust the information, find the information contradictory, or feel anxious when they read what they find. Most (53%), however, go directly to a doctor or other health professional when they have a question.

“Online resources can be useful tools to learn about general health-related topics. It is important for consumers to know that the information gained from online searches may not have the same level of applicability to every individual. Also, any written material is open to misinterpretation and online health websites are not immune to this,” said Elif Özdener, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice at Fairleigh Dickinson University School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. “I am excited to see that over half of those who read online health sources use the information to have discussions with their healthcare providers. Patient-centered healthcare is a significant factor in achieving positive health outcomes. People that research and read health information can have productive conversations with their providers and increase the likelihood of achieving their health-related goals.”

Methodology

The National Health Survey was conducted by The Fairleigh Dickinson University Poll on behalf of the FDU School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. A random sample was drawn of adults nationwide, including in Alaska and Hawaii, and interviews were conducted on landlines and cellphones between January 28 through February 13, 2019. Respondents were screened in order to interview an adult, 18 or older.

A total of 1000 interviews were administered by ReconMR in San Marcos, Texas. 296 interviews were conducted on landlines and 704 were conducted on cell phones by professionally trained interviewers using a CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing) system. All interviews were conducted in English. Telephone numbers were purchased by ReconMR through Marketing Systems Group.

Results for the total sample have a margin of sampling error of +/- 4.03 percentage points, including the design effect.

Survey results are also subject to non-sampling error. This kind of error, which cannot be measured, arises from a number of factors including, but not limited to, non-response (eligible individuals refusing to be interviewed), question wording, the order in which questions are asked, and variations among interviewers.

Weighting was applied to the sample to more accurately treat the respondents are representatives of the total population of the United States. 2019 estimates of the U.S. population by Claritas were used to weight the data. In this case, the proportions of three characteristics were used; Race, Age and Gender. Each respondent falls into one, and only one, set and no respondent is left out.

HBCU 2nd Annual Day

Every year, HBCUs fall lower on the United States Congress’ list of priorities. In turn, the outcry commences from current students and alumni of these institutions. On April 17, 2018, HBCU Collective will host it’s 2nd Annual Day of Action on Capitol Hill with fellow HBCU students, alumni, and supporters who are concerned with preserving the legacy and future of historically black institutions.

During the day of action, HBCU Collective and its advocates are prepared to ask state and federal legislators for additional funding and assistance for facility upgrades, an increase in financial support for students, and funding for federal research grants. These call to actions, along with student-scheduled meetings with legislators, put HBCUs back on the forefront as we fight to protect the legacy and opportunities that HBCUs provide. In addition, there will be a formal press conference directly behind the U.S. Capitol.

Founder, Robert Stephens, is anticipating the 2nd Annual Day of Action. He quotes, “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. It is time to organize, determine where we can exert pressure, and push until our schools and students have an equitable distribution of resources.

This will be an empowering day for all attendees, regardless of age, color, and institution attended. Come for the experience and leave armed with tools to continue advocating for the support of HBCUs.

For more information and to RSVP for HBCU Collective 2nd Annual Day of Action, please visit https://www.hbcucollective.org/. For media credentials or to request an interview with the Founder, Robert Stephens, send inquiries to Ria@BlancheMediaGroup.com. To keep up with the HBCU Collective on social media, follow @HBCU_Collective on Twitter and “LIKE” the Facebook page via HBCU Collective.

RE-ENGINEERING HUMANITY

Everyday new warnings emerge about artificial intelligence rebelling against us. All the while, a more immediate dilemma flies under the radar. Have forces been unleashed that are thrusting humanity down an ill-advised path, one that’s increasingly making us behave like simple machines?

Have a look at the book’s website.

About the Authors

Brett Frischmann is The Charles Widger Endowed University Professor in Law, Business and Economics at Villanova University. He is also an affiliated scholar of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, and a trustee for the Nexa Center for Internet & Society, Politecnico di Torino. He has published foundational books on the relationships between infrastructural resources, governance, commons, and spillovers.

Evan Selinger is Professor of Philosophy at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where he is also the Head of Research Communications, Community, and Ethics at the Center for Media, Arts, Games, Interaction, and Creativity. A Senior Fellow at the Future of Privacy Forum, his primary research is on the ethical and privacy dimensions of emerging technology. Selinger is a prolific writer and his next anthology is The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy, co- edited with JulesPolontesky and OmerTene (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2018). A strong advocate of public philosophy, he regularly writes for magazines, newspapers, and blogs, including The Guardian, The Atlantic, Slate, and Wired.

Advance Praise Re-Engineering Humanity

Frischmann and Selinger provide a thoroughgoing and balanced examination of the tradeoffs inherent in offloading tasks and decisions to computers. By illuminating these often intricate and hidden tradeoffs, and providing a practical framework for assessing and negotiating them, the authors give us the power to make wiser choices.

Nicolas Carr, author of The Glass Cage: How Our Computers Are Changing Us, from the Foreword

Re-Engineering Humanity brings a pragmatic if somewhat dystopic perspective to the technological phenomena of our age. Humans are learning machines and we learn from our experiences. This book made me ask myself whether the experiences we are providing to our societies are in fact beneficial in the long run.

Vint Cerf, Co-Inventor of the Internet

Frischmann and Selinger deftly and convincingly show why we should be less scared of robots than of becoming more robotic, ourselves. This book will convince you why it’s so important we embed technologies with human values before they embed us with their own. Douglas Rushkoff, author of Present Shock, Program or Be Programmed, and Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus.

Everybody is suddenly worried about technology. Will social media be the end of democracy? Is automation going to eliminate jobs? Will artificial intelligence make people obsolete? Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger boldly propose that the problem isn’t the rise of ‘smart’ machines but the dumbing down of humanity. This refreshingly philosophical book asks what’s lost when we outsource our decision-making to algorithmic systems we don’t own and barely understand. Better yet, it proposes conceptual and practical ways to reclaim our autonomy and dignity in the face of new forms of computational control.

Astra Taylor, author of The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Control in the Digital Age

A magnificent achievement. Writing in the tradition of Neil Postman, Jacque Ellul and Marshall McLuhan, this book is the decade’s deepest and most powerful portrayal of the challenges to freedom created by our full embrace of comprehensive techno-social engineering. A rewarding and stimulating book that merits repeated readings and may also cause you to reconsider how you live life.

Tim Wu, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School, and author of The Attention Merchants

About Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press dates from 1534 and is part of the University of Cambridge. We further the University’s mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence. Playing a leading role in today’s global marketplace, we have over 50 offices around the globe, and we distribute our products to nearly every country in the world. We publish titles written by authors in over 100 different countries.

J.D. Power × Network Quality

Photo Credit: Google Images

J.D. Power has just issued the release for its U.S. Wireless Network Quality Performance Study–Volume 1 for 2018, based on the responses of 38,595 wireless customers (phones, tablets, and mobile broadband devices) from July through December 2017.

Below are some of the key findings of the study:

·         Unlimited data continues to improve customer perception of quality: Unlimited data plan customers experience an average of 11 overall network quality problems per 100 connections (PP100) vs. an average of 13 PP100 among customers with data allowances. They also experience a lower incidence of data problems (15 PP100 vs. 17PP100).

·         Bring your own device (BYOD) customers experience higher incidence of network quality problems: Overall network quality for customers who brought their own device is 12 PP100 vs. 11 PP100 for those who paid their carrier in full or in installments for a device. This difference in overall network quality is driven by gaps in calling quality (14 PP100 among those who brought their own device vs. 13 PP100 among those who purchased a device from their carrier) and data quality (17 PP100 vs. 15 PP100).

·         Phone age not really a factor: The average age of a phone brought to a carrier is 19 months vs. 14 months for phones that were purchased through the carrier. However, network quality does not necessarily decline with phone age. Phones less than a year and a half old are associated with 12 PP100 vs. 10 PP100 among phones 18 months or older, suggesting that some quality issues may be caused by network optimization issues and not the age of the phone.

As usual, the different carriers were also ranked. Verizon Wireless ranks highest in all six regions covered in the study, with better PP100 scores than the regional averages in call quality, messaging quality and data quality. U.S. Cellular ranks highest in a tie with Verizon Wireless in the North Central region.

Drakes Beach Sand Sculpture Contest

Point Reyes National Seashore invites you to 

the 36th Annual Sand Sculpture Contest 

at Drakes Beach

Sunday, August 27, 2017

from 9 am to 3:30 pm

Prizes awarded in each of several age and group categories. Free to participants and spectators. Registration begins at 9 am at the Ken Patrick Visitor Center. Judging begins at 12 pm and prizes will be awarded at 3:30 pm.

Please note the change of date. The Annual Sand Sculpture Contest will be held on the Sunday before Labor Day weekend, as opposed to the Sunday of Labor Day weekend.

We welcome all ages at this free community event located at Drakes Beach. Categories include: Children (14 and under), Families, Adult Individuals, and Adult Groups. Three prizes will be awarded in each of those categories, along with prizes for the sculpture with the most recycled plastic included.

Please be aware that parking will be extremely limited during the contest and Drakes Beach will be heavily impacted with contest participants. To avoid crowds here, please consider visiting another beach in the park.

This event is family based, but please remember no dogs are allowed on this designated swimming beach (no lifeguard on duty).

Bring a picnic and spend the day! Or, patronize the PRNSA Bookstore for hot and cold drinks, breakfast pastries, oatmeal, snacks, sandwiches, books, and gifts for sale. All proceeds benefit Point Reyes National Seashore!

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Point Reyes National Seashore Association’s Drake’s Beach Bookstore stocks a selection of apparel and field guides in addition to a wide variety of snacks, drinks, and hot coffee to provision your excursion into the park.

We’ll be open this weekend, Saturday, August 26, at 10am, and Sunday, August 27, at 9am, the store closes at 5pm both days.

While you’re out on the Point, make time to visit the newly restored Drakes Estero, the only West Coast marine wilderness south of Alaska, and the restored Drakes Estero Trail, both made possible in part by PRNSA and donors like you.
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PRNSA works with the park and the public to preserve, restore and maintain wildlife habitat, trails, and historic sites in our beautifulcoastal park. If you would like to renew your membership or give an additional gift, let them hear from you!

 

Learn about PRNSA’s many varied programs and events at

www.ptreyes.org