Posts tagged with "addiction"

CBD, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

How can vaping improve your life?

90% of smokers sooner or later decide to quit the addiction. But keep your promise to yourself not to smoke is sometimes tricky. It has long been proven that smoking is not so much physical as psychological dependence. No nicotine patch or special chewing gum will replace the exits to the smoke break. And here a vape or, in simpler terms, an electronic cigarette enters the arena, replacing the usual one both psychologically and physically, satisfying the body’s need for nicotine.


It should be noted that nicotine is not a carcinogen, and its toxicity is in the same group as caffeine and many kitchen seasonings. By the way, for those who want to eliminate nicotine consumption completely, electronic cigarettes are the best option. Why? Read on.


How to choose an electronic cigarette?


Although our society is considered modern and advanced, for the vast majority of people, the look, and even more so the soaring of an electronic cigarette, causes bewilderment and fear. We hasten to reassure you, set up and use the best wax pens (https://vapingdaily.com/vaporizers/weed-pens/best-dab-wax-pen/) no more difficult than, for example, with an elementary mobile phone. To do this, it’s worthwhile to clarify the principle of operation of an e-cigarette.


An electronic cigarette consists of a battery pack, it is a battery, and an atomizer is a tank. The atomizer, in turn, consists of a reservoir for storing liquid and an evaporation element – the heart of an electronic cigarette. The evaporator is a structure composed of a spiral and cotton. And then ordinary physics: the battery supplies voltage to the spiral, which in turn heats the cotton soaked in a special liquid for soaring. This is where we get the fragrant steam. By the way, this very liquid is for soaring and can be either nicotine-free or with nicotine content.


Everything else regarding the electronic cigarette, appearance, and form factor is a matter of the buyer’s taste. The only things worth paying attention to are the presence of Varivatt, Varivolt, and thermal control modes (regulation of power, voltage, and steam temperature, respectively).
There are the best dab pens with and without these options. In the first case, the user sets the indicators suitable for him, but in the absence of these modes, the supplied voltage, and therefore the amount of steam, will depend on the battery charge level. If you want to use these settings, you can buy a vape mod.


What is the harm and benefit of vaping?

There are no large-scale studies that would demonstrate a clear and unified point of view on the effect of electronic cigarettes and vapor devices on human health and those around them. This is because people began to smoke (wipe) relatively recently – about 3-5 years ago.
Such a short period is not enough for serious research about the harm of vaping. Nevertheless, some centers and universities still decided to trace the people who smoke electronic cigarettes and draw the first conclusions. For example, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley Labs found that liquids in electronic devices contain 31 toxic chemicals, including acrolein, diacetyl, and formaldehyde, whose levels increase depending on the temperature and type of wax vaporizer.


At the same time, researchers at The Roswell Park Cancer Institute concluded that smoking (vaporizing) electronic devices have a less pronounced carcinogenic effect than regular cigarettes. But wait, vapers, it’s too early to triumph. The study was published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research in 2016, but it was conducted in 2011.


Therefore, it is difficult to judge its relevance. Another study reports the following: using electronic cigarettes can reduce mortality due to regular smoking by 21%. The lead author of the study, David Levy, a professor at Georgetown University in Washington, says that electronic cigarettes can improve a person’s health if he uses them as a replacement for regular smoking. These different results only prove what we talked about: vaping is a new phenomenon, and so far too little time has passed so that scientists can decide whether this hobby is harmful or not.


From the pluses: in electronic devices, there are no combustion products – particles of soot and tar. These substances usually settle on the mucous membranes of the lungs, bronchi, and upper respiratory tract, which causes a violation of their functions and ultimately leads to the development of many diseases of these organs. Because of the products of combustion, smokers of regular cigarettes turn yellow their teeth, worsen their sense of smell and taste.
Those who prefer a wax pen can avoid these troubles. Another advantage of electronic cigarettes can be considered the absence of exposure to the respiratory organs of hot burning smoke. In combination with nicotine, high temperatures increase the risk of carcinogenic processes.


In general, most scientists agree on one thing: vaping is much less harmful than smoking, but it cannot be called safe. Of the additional bonuses: the ability to vape in the rooms, the absence of the pungent smell of smoke from clothes and hair and the mouth, and “pleasant things” due to quitting smoking: restoration of smell, improvement of well-being, and so on.


But it should be remembered that sometimes the transition to steam can be accompanied by unpleasant sensations. They arise, as a rule, due to quitting smoking. The “withdrawal syndrome” is launched, the body, accustomed to the products of tobacco burning, begins to rebuild in a new way. In some cases, even nausea appears. As a scapegoat, vaping is logically chosen, the person starts smoking again, the body returns to normal, and the smoker forever refuses to use a wax vape pen again.
With reasonable expenses, vaping is cheaper than cigarette smoking, but this is not always the case. Very often, a person quickly retracts, and soon the “smoker” apartment begins to resemble an alchemical laboratory: everywhere there are strange bubbles with markings on them, various devices, and above all this rises a collection of multiple devices filled with colored liquids.

How to Spot Fentanyl Abuse in the Workplace – And What To Do About It

Synthetic opioids – primarily illegal fentanyl which is 50-100x more potent than morphine – are the most common drugs involved in overdose deaths in the United States. The effects of fentanyl use and misuse are not isolated to the home of course; there are consequences that can affect an individual’s work environment, including fellow employees and customers. Employers who are not aware of this may face a startling wake-up call. Addiction expert Dr. Deni Carise of Recovery Centers of America is speaking at the 2019 Labor Assistance Professionals Conference this week on the topic of addiction, relapse and recovery and is available for an interview on the topic of spotting fentanyl (and other opioids) abuse in the workplace, as well as what to do about it.

According to Dr. Carise: “Drug use in the workplace can be obvious or subtle as different drugs present in different ways. An employee under the influence of fentanyl may exhibit extreme happiness, drowsiness, nausea, confusion, sedation, have problems breathing, or become unconscious. Overdosing on fentanyl presents as slow or shallow breathing, slow heartbeat, severe sleepiness, cold and clammy skin, trouble walking or talking, feeling faint, dizzy, or confused, or complete unresponsiveness. Employees under the influence of fentanyl may seem completely normal and functioning well, then experience noticeable mood or energy swings. They may appear to doze off while working which can endanger themselves and those around them depending on their profession. The most important thing to remember is that fentanyl and opioid abuse is a treatable disease. Employees can and do recover from opioid dependence to return to work as fully productive, contributing members of a work team.”

Dr. Deni Carise bio: For nearly 30 years, Deni Carise, PhD, has served as an important national voice on substance use disorder, treatment and recovery and regularly speaks at national conferences on current trends in the field. She is a clinical psychologist and assistant adjunct professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and chief scientific officer for Recovery Centers of America. Dr. Carise has provided consult for the White House and internationally with treatment providers in other countries to develop national systems of clinical treatment delivery. She has published over 100 articles, books and chapters on addiction and related topics. With extensive knowledge, media experience and her own personal experience in recovery, Dr. Carise speaks in plain truths and succinct sound-bites about the scope and stigma of addiction, the quest for treatment, and the challenges of recovery.

Wellness Expert Shares Personal Struggle with Addiction & Depression

ADDICITION. Doesn’t discriminate.
ANXIETY. Indifferent to credentials and achievements.
DEPRESSION. Blind to where you live.

By: Dr. Natacha D. Nelson D.C, M.A.

“Look at you, your parents should be disgusted by you”, voices whispered solely for my ears.

“Your black daddy and your white mommy should be ashamed, to get married, to have you…”, their unapologetic words punctured my naive heart. The seed planted.

“A half breed, black girl shouldn’t be raised by a foreign, white woman. You should be taken and given to a proper home”. Their sentiments pierced every cell of my seven year old body. The terror became real.

***

I Attended a private high school and college. And I was an addict. An eating disorder, compulsive exercise and alcohol consumed my life. Desperate to distract myself from painful and uncomfortable feelings, the addictions led to academic probation and ultimately, dismissal from college.

Determined to become successful, I redeemed myself as the doctor of a large successful practice. I became an internationally competing athlete, married, had a family and good friends around me. None of my achievements dissolved the terror restless below the surface. The image I portrayed eclipsed my fear. Not even I noticed the hibernating rumblings.

Skilled at detecting possible threats against me or my mom (whether real or imagined) I blotted out the physical and emotional consequences of undetected anxiety growing fierce. My duty as a protector and provider devoured my time, money, energy and resources. In attempt to thwart perceived threats, I bankrupt myself; physically, emotionally, spiritually and financially. Unable to force myself out of bed, depression ensued.

The proverbial earthquake jolted my life. Demolishing the comfortable walls I erected for safety. Raw and vulnerable, I allowed myself to feel the heartbreak, the grief and the rage. Courageously, I engaged one feeling, one emotion, at a time. Finally willing to acknowledging the terror and pain, I desperately tried circumvent.

Giving my hurt permission to breathe, I began to write. And the healing balm, called Love, soothed my aching heart. Through writing, I was able to sift through four decades of actions and behaviors of my life. Eventually, the “A-Ha” moment revealed itself to me.

*****

The insight that my choices and decisions were unconsciously driven by the need to prove to myself and others, that I was lovable. I wanted to feel accepted, at least tolerated enough, to dissuade others from harming me or my mom.

Unknowingly, my efforts could never hush the unloved parts of me I refused to accept. Other people’s beliefs- about me, my parents and my life- I accepted as true. As long as I held the misbelief that I was unlovable, nothing I could do would override my inner judgments of myself. My outward actions would follow my unconscious beliefs.

My only mistake was to believe the false words of strangers and neighbors. Accepting their judgments as true and accurate. Believing I was bad, wrong, worthless and to be ashamed of. My parents’ marriage-one year after interracial marriage was legalized- to some, was deemed a disgust and my black and white mixed skin was a disgrace.

Once I forgave myself, for choices I made from fear and misinterpretations about myself, the healing began. I could not prove I was loveable if I didn’t believe I was. Accepting I am loveable, I no longer felt the need to prove it; not to myself, to my parents, to anyone. I forgave myself for buying into the unkind words of strangers and neighbors. I Forgave myself for the actions and behaviors I engaged in as a result of the misinterpretations I believed about myself. I Forgave my parents for the mistakes I believed they made in raising me. And forgave the authority figures of my childhood whose unkind words hurt me.

Addictions thwarted my college experience.

Anxiety bankrupt me.

Depression forced me to look at every aspect of my life, lovingly guiding me through the necessary emotional process. The healing work was worth the time and effort. I am finally free.

To you, Beloved Reader. You, too, are loved, are loveable and your life matters.

With Loving,
Natacha.

To learn more about my story, my services, visit:
www.adancingzebra.com
www.lifedoctor.guru
“Finding Courage to Let YOU Out” is available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

About the author
Dr. Natacha D. Nelson D.C, M.A., has dedicated her career to understanding the connections between physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being through principles of Chiropractic and Spiritual Psychology. A practicing chiropractor for over 20 years, she is the owner of Inside Out Wellness Center, as well as a former professional beach volleyball player and advisor on health and wellness for the Santa Clara Fire and Menlo-Atherton Police Departments. She is a Mental Health and Wellness consultant and educator who keeps up on the latest research and attends continuing education seminars and scientific symposia, and has a master’s degree in Spiritual Psychology. She lives in Los Angeles, with her daughter.

Six Ways to Cut Down on Alcohol

by Tara Yombor, LMHC and clinical director at Pathway to Hope, a Delphi Behavioral Health Group facility.

Social (moderate) drinking, binge drinking, alcoholism, tolerance, and dependence. This is the typical pattern of progression for drinking that leads someone to think of him or herself as needing to cut down on alcohol. Some might think they are prone to alcoholism. Within that progression, the time for someone to cut down on drinking is based on the individual’s idea of what is causing dysfunction and unmanageability in their life.

Why is it so easy for someone to become addicted to alcohol, and what does it mean to have
an alcohol use disorder?

First of all, alcohol does not have an adverse social stigma, which makes the dependence for it more likely, and the consumption of it more acceptable. Alcohol is typically used to celebrate happy events and sooth the sad events in life. Think about a celebration. What do most people imagine? Alcohol, champagne, and a “toast to the New Year!”

During times of mourning or stress, alcohol can be used to ease the emotional pain of a loss or as a stress reliever. Social (or moderate) drinking is seen as a normal and perfectly harmless way of socializing, relaxing, or a form of celebration.

A binge drinker is defined as a man who drinks more than four to six drinks in a two-hour period, and a woman who drinks more than four to five drinks in a two-hour period. Someone with alcohol use disorder is typically a person with a long-term addiction to alcohol. This person is typically unable to control how much they consume or when to stop drinking and spends a lot of time thinking about the next drink.

It can be easy for someone to transition from a social drinker to a binge drinker to having an
alcohol use disorder. A binge drinker is someone who has more than the above allotted
acceptable drinks in a short amount of time.

Someone who is a binge drinker or struggling with heavy alcohol use may find that people close to them begin to notice negative patterns of behavior during times of drinking. Friends and family may start to become worried about the person’s drinking patterns and negative outcomes that have begun to arise from their drinking. A person who begins to engage in
binge drinking may find themselves calling out of work the day after drinking due to a hangover; they may miss important deadlines, get into arguments with their loved ones, or lose track of daily responsibilities.

Tolerance for alcohol means that a person needs more and more alcohol to feel the desired effect than they previously would not have needed. Someone who has a pattern of binge drinking may find themselves drinking even more alcohol in a short time to feel drunk.

Once tolerance increases, the possibility of dependence increases. Dependence can be defined as relying on alcohol to avoid withdrawal symptoms. Essentially, a person is controlled by their need to ingest alcohol to feel “normal.”

During any of these stages of alcohol use, someone may feel the need to seek treatment. The need for treatment varies for each person based on how dysfunctional or unmanageable their life has become due to their drinking.

Here are six things you (or anyone) can do to cut down on alcohol. Most of these mean a change in behavior.

1. Acknowledge the problem – in order to stop the behavior, you must first acknowledge what the negative behavior is and make a conscious effort to commit to changing that behavior. Also, put the goal in writing and make a list of reasons why you want to cut back on drinking. For example, if the behavior is drinking too much during celebrations, you have to determine what “too much” means to you and, next, set a goal to decrease the amount you are drinking during celebrations.

2. Set a realistic goal for drinking alcohol – if you struggle with binge drinking, set a realistic, and achievable goal. The next time you’re out during a social event, make it a goal to cut back to three to four drinks in two hours instead of five to six. Or perhaps instead of going to a happy hour on Friday or Saturday night, pick one night to go out and stay in the other night. Cutting back by making realistic and achievable goals will keep you on track and make you feel better about the fact that you are keeping your goals.

3. Write it down – make sure to keep a journal of the times you drink, how much you drink, and any negative outcomes related to the times you drink (for example, drinking and falling down or making an inappropriate comment to a friend). By keeping a journal, you will hopefully be able to see patterns of behavior. You can also share this journal with someone you trust and ask them to look out for any patterns you may have missed.

4. Don’t keep alcohol in your house – it is easier to come home after a long day of work and pour a glass of wine rather than going out to the bar on a Wednesday when you may have other obligations at home such as taking care of a child. When you don’t have alcohol in the house, it eliminates the desire or temptation to drink.

5. Stay busy – by having non-alcohol related activities to engage in, you are more likely to say no to drinking, as you’ll want to be present for the activity. Do things that keep you active, such as riding a bike, hiking, going for a walk as the endorphins from engaging in exercise may eliminate the desire for alcohol.

6. Ask for support/Talk to someone – tell people you trust about your goals and ask them to help keep you accountable during times when you may be struggling or find yourself surrounded by temptation. Also, there are therapists who specialize in alcohol/substance use who you can talk to that can assist you with your goals and process through any underlying emotions that may be related to drinking.

Remember that the above tips may not work for everyone. Some people may be into the stage of alcohol tolerance and dependence. If you or someone you love is struggling with alcohol dependence, reach out for help from a professional or call a treatment center in your area. Alcoholism and dependence look different for everyone.

Sober.House.

Happening right now, drug addiction in the US has reached epidemic proportions. What’s worse, only 11 percent of those people will find the right treatment. It’s time to eliminate the stigma and focus on a tangible solution, rather than the problem.

Mallory Neuberger lived a double life for years, suffering from a soul-crushing addiction to cocaine while hiding behind a successful career and raising two children. After finding sobriety, she has made it her mission to help others by opening and running sober houses for women.  

Anchored in relatable stories and filled with actionable tips for anyone affected by addiction, Sober.House. offers readers:

  • Stop the Stigma: Eliminating the shame to understand the truth about addiction—which is a disease, not a disgraceful condition
  • Recovery is Possible: How anyone who is an addict, or an alcoholic, can find healing and a more fulfilling lifestyle
  • Paying it Forward: Her journey to helping others who are battling addiction, and how it has filled her once empty soul with meaning and purpose
  • Good vs. Evil: How to find authentic, ethical places for treatment and sober living while avoiding the illegitimate ones
  • The Frog Pad: The sober houses she has created for women to help them restore their lives for themselves and their loved ones

Follow Mallory Neuberger on Social Media

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Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

The Truth About Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

by Mallory Neuberger

Wendy Williams made headlines last week when she revealed that she’s living in a sober house; but less than one week later she left work, checked out of the facility, and went on to drink alcohol until she was hospitalized. So, what went wrong?

Sobriety is not something that we can pay for. As a recovering cocaine addict, I had to admit that I was an addict and that I was ready for a drug free life. In essence, I had to hit my bottom. Some people die before they find the willingness to get sober. Others need to end up in prison, homeless, or selling their bodies and souls to feed their disease. And many, like myself, don’t lost their homes, cars, jobs or families, but find themselves spiritually void and miserable, with their drug of choice no longer providing the relief that it once had.

Wendy Williams is going through difficulties in her marriage. Her husband is rumored to be cheating on her, and his mistress is pregnant. Despite appearing on television daily, living in a sober house, and paying a sober coach to keep tabs on her 24/7, she still couldn’t handle her heartbreak and to alcohol to numb her pain. The next day she was back on TV. In my opinion, she isn’t ready.

Ethical sober houses keep residents safe by breathalyzing and drug testing them. They have guidelines to provide structure, including curfews, chore checks, and mandatory attendance at 12-step meetings like A.A. or N.A. There are organizations that certify sober houses as good operators, so it’s important to be sure that you are choosing a place that truly has the residents’ best interests at heart.

Sober houses offer a sense of community. They are filled with residents and staff who are all trying to stay sober and meet life head on. There is always someone to talk to, so we are never alone. In my sober houses we emphasize healthy living, encouraging good eating habits and exercise. We practice yoga and we meditate together. We offer fellowship where we eat, laugh, play games, make crafts, listen to music, and sit by the pool. We celebrate together, helping one another get through birthdays, holidays and anniversaries without picking up. We are houses filled with sober women and we are like a big family filled with surrogate mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends. We cry together, and more importantly, we laugh.

Putting down drugs and alcohol seemed like the only way I could live, but what kind of a life was it going to be? I feared that I would be socially awkward without my expensive wines or a frozen margarita with salt. I didn’t think I would be able to stay awake without my beloved cocaine. I was losing my best friends – drugs and alcohol – how would I ever have fun again?

The sheer happiness that I have found as a sober woman is greater than any high that I ever experienced. I wake up every morning without a hangover or user’s remorse. I dance whenever and wherever I can, even while trying on clothes in stores, or at parties where nobody else has hit the dance floor. I run by the beach, singing out loud, without worrying that I may die of a stroke due to last night’s excesses. I practice yoga and can actually “be” on the mat for ninety minutes, breathing freely through my once stuffed nostrils.

I have a disease, and that disease is called addiction. I am no longer ashamed and hiding behind it. Addiction is not a weakness or a character defect. It is a debilitating disease without a medicine to cure it. Money cannot buy my recovery, but working a daily program can keep me sober, one day at a time. Every day I go to a 12-step meeting. I remind myself that I’m an addict in recovery and I reset my brain and ask for the strength to remain sober just for today. I am of service to others in recovery, showing them that this simple program works. It isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it. My worst day sober is always better than my best day high, because I am authentic and free and living the very best version of myself. I hope that Wendy Williams hits her bottom soon, and without any terrible consequences. I would love her to live in one of my sober houses.

About Mallory Neuberger

Mallory Neuberger, MS, CRRA, author of Sober.House (My Story), is the executive director of The Frog Pad, a safe and structured holistic healing house for women in recovery from drugs and alcohol. After struggling with her own addiction, Neuberger has dedicated her life to helping others find sobriety, volunteering at drug recovery centers including Hazelden IOP, The Addiction Institute in NYC, Gods Love We Deliver, and soup kitchens. She was also employed at Behavior Health of the Palm Beaches before opening her first sober house.

HOW CAN YOU GET ADDICTION TREATMENT WITHOUT INSURANCE?

One of the most critical situations in modern society is being alone in a difficult situation. What do we have to do if you found out that you are alcohol or drug addicted? Surely, the first thing to do if you cannot control yourself is to ask for help. However, sometimes it happens that you have nobody to ask for help or people, who wish to help have no possibilities.

How much does rehab cost without insurance?

Actually, there is no correct answer to this question, because different recovery programs use different techniques, different specialists work with you, they use different medicines, and there are many other different conditions, which determine the price. First, look through the types of rehab facilities to choose the one you need. They may be medical detox centers, intensive outpatient programs, holistic rehab center, partial hospitalization programs, standard outpatient treatment, etc.

To talk generally, inpatient treatment usually costs more than participation in outpatient rehabilitation programmes in Bellevue. It is evident as the inpatient treatment foresees that you live in the facility and use all the conveniences, receive food, get medical supervision. The price also depends on how long you stay in the rehab facility and what other services and amenities you require (private rooms, swimming pool, gym, massage, etc.).

One is tempted to ask the question of what to do if you have no opportunities to pay for your addiction treatment? Is that possible to get help for addiction without insurance?

Different social programs may cover your expenses for the rehabilitation programme partially or fully. First, if there are some life-threatening risks of consuming some substance, you would receive emergency treatment and regardless of whether you can pay or not. Hopefully, you will not get into such a situation.

There also exist some options for flexible payment. They may be scholarship, grant, financing, etc. It is important to note here is that cutting corners on recovery programme may turn into future problems. It is of utter importance to reclaim your health and life. The fact is that you would spend more money on drugs or alcohol if you continue succumbing to the addiction than on any rehab for people with no insurance (find more here).

Do not be too lazy to call several recovery centers and find out what conditions of payment they have. First, many treatment facilities may offer reduced treatment costs or a sliding fee scale because of the pieces of evidence that you do not make high enough income.

Secondly, there exist some non-profit organizations or foundations, which may offer you some scholarships. Usually, one of the conditions of getting a scholarship is the absence of insurance. Application for such programs may give you the way to rehab for people with no insurance.

Thirdly, depending on your credit score, you may ask some lending institutions for providing drug or alcohol treatment without insurance. The specifications of such cooperation differ in each personal case.

Fourthly, do not be too shy to ask your friends and relatives. Sometimes they do not even know that you need this sort of help. Doctors say that involving family members into the process of recovery may make you closer and you would definitely feel more support. This may also change the views of your family on the attitude before and make it more integrated. A friend at court is better than a penny in purse.

To sum up, do not be afraid of sharing your problems. In the modern world, many people feel sympathy for those, who cannot afford treatment, so the only thing you have to do is to ask.

Author:

Jeffrey Buckley is a blogger who investigates human health issues and behaviorist anthropology. He researches substance abuse problems and the ways to overcome addictions.

 

“Two Reasons Why I Won’t Report My Child Abuse”

Excerpt from The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook By Steve Simpson

“The first reason is I know that I could be better in school. I know I mess up at home. The clothes I wear. The way I have my hair. The attitude I have. The trouble that I get in. I bring it on myself. If I were a better person these things probably wouldn’t happen to me. Ever since I can remember, I have been told by my parents that all the problems at home are my fault. People have it worse than I do.” These are the thoughts of many who are being abused and the first reasons why they won’t report it.

What I discovered was that even children who do fantastic in school, never get in any trouble, and do everything “right” still get abused by their parents or abusive adults in their home. Their parents even called them the same names as me and they were model children. I’ve found it has nothing to do with the way I act at all. It has nothing to do with who I was. It has nothing to do with the children. It has to do with the adults. Child abuse and discipline have nothing to do with each other. People who abuse children do it because of their own sickness, be it alcoholism, drug abuse or other problems they have.

“I knew my father or my mother’s boyfriend had no right to abuse me but I always felt that my mother would get in trouble for it.” This is the thought of many abuse victims and the second reason why they don’t report it. Even though they are getting abused they still try to protect the non-abusing/co-dependent parent. What I offer to those children is you would not so much be getting your parent in trouble, but you would be getting them help. Most authorities get them to go to therapy, which would stop that parent from allowing abuse to themselves and others in the future, therefore making their life better. So by protecting yourself you’re actually not getting anyone in trouble but protecting them and getting them help as well. Even the abusive adult could end up getting help as a result of you reporting it. Nobody should abuse you, period!

If you are being abused in any way, sometimes the abuse looks like it’s becoming less frequent. Don’t be fooled by this. It could suddenly pick up again and get worse. It will not stop unless you do something to stop it. Speak to a teacher, guidance counselor, school social worker or psychologist. Counselors from community centers and sometimes even people from local churches will know what to do and how to get you help. You can call Child Protective Services for your local area. Nobody should be abused in any way. You are no exception. You are worth getting help.

Approximately 5 children die a day as a result of child abuse. For those who suspect child abuse whether it be a relative or neighbor, it always amazes me how people will call 911 simply because someone parked in the wrong spot or put the garbage out on the wrong night, yet they won’t get “involved” in possibly saving a child’s life or at a minimum their childhood (not to mention the problems they will have as an adult as a result of their abuse). As responsible people we are already “involved”.

If you suspect child abuse it probably does exist. Don’t make excuses or protect and enable the abuser. Protect who you are supposed to protect, the children.

 

About Steve Simpson
Steve Simpson is a child advocate, child abuse survivor and media commentator who just released The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook — a small guide that is modestly tucked inside in all four of his YA adventure novels which covers most of the topics plaguing young people today—suicide, bullying, sexual abuse, physical abuse, verbal abuse, self-worth, being the child of an addict, living in a dysfunctional home, surviving school and more. Simpson was even recognized by President Barack Obama, former New York governor David Paterson and the County Executive of Nassau County for his efforts on behalf of abused children.

 

Opioid Epidemic

The painful and prevalent problem of opioid addiction plaguing families across our country has sparked national attention as the overdose death rates of these individuals has skyrocketed the past few years. The pervasiveness of the opioid epidemic is due in large part to the over-prescription of opioid pain medication and the highly addictive nature of these medications. Pharmaceutical companies and morally-corrupt doctors threw caution to the wind as “pill-mills” popped up all over the US. Although opioid use often begins with a legitimate injury and prescription for pain medication, those unfamiliar with the dangers of addiction are naïve to the depths of depravity it can take even the most innocent of souls.

As tolerance to the drug builds, the individual takes more than prescribed to alleviate the pain. Eventually, the suggestion is made to crush the pill and snort it for a better, more immediate high. The treatment morphs into a habit, then an obsession. Most opioid addictions escalate to intravenous use. Though the person previously swore never to pick up a needle, the temptation outweighs the willpower, and life becomes consumed with chasing the euphoria of that first shot. At this point, the sheer financial burden of the habit is insurmountable. Lying, cheating, stealing, anything becomes justifiable in the name of the next fix.

Inevitably, the solution becomes substituting the FDA regulated pills for the significantly cheaper heroin, which promises a more intense high. The recent inclusion of fentanyl in heroin increases the potency and the likelihood of overdose and death. Suffering with addiction is painful, exhausting, and frightening. Attempting sobriety means enduring withdraws, reality, feelings, and memories. Negative experiences with shady recovery businesses leaves clients feeling jaded and mistrustful. Unfortunately, many treatment centers view clients as numbers or worse, dollar signs.

They treat clients according to insurance benefits rather than clients’ needs. Once insurance quits paying, clients are dropped off at bus stations to fend for themselves with no resources. Luckily, the substance abuse field is starting to shift, and task forces in South Florida are shutting down illegitimate “treatment centers” whose sole focus is greed. Cleaning up the reputation of the recovery realm paves the way for companies genuinely vested in the best interest of the clients and the communities, like Delphi Behavioral Health Group. With fifteen treatment facilities in various locations across the United States offering the spectrum of care, Delphi understands every client is unique and so too is the specific treatment needed. Willing to step outside the norm, Delphi launched New Perspectives in Boynton Beach, Florida, a medication-assisted treatment facility.

MAT, while still somewhat controversial, is becoming an optimal treatment option for those suffering from long-term opioid addiction that have tried and failed at traditional, abstinence-based treatment models. New Perspectives offers a contingency-based model with highly monitored and conservative doses of Suboxone films. Suboxone decreases cravings for opioids and initiates withdrawal symptoms if opioids are ingested. Clients must be compliant with the clinical program to receive their prescriptions. Suboxone, in conjunction with intensive therapeutic services, provides a real opportunity for those afflicted with opioid addiction to finally create a life of sobriety. True, there is an opioid epidemic afflicting our nation, but new medications and treatment modalities bring hope that its reign is nearing an end.

Jennifer Behnke, MS, LMFT, LMHC, QS
Jennifer Behnke, Clinical Director at New Perspectives, has worked in the field of mental health and substance abuse for over a decade. Jennifer graduated from Palm Beach Atlantic University in 2012 with a master’s degree in counseling psychology. In 2014, Jennifer became a licensed mental health counselor and licensed marriage & family therapist. At that time, she opened her private practice and took a position as a clinical director. Jennifer helped launch the medication-assisted treatment program at New Perspectives and became a qualified supervisor. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in marriage & family therapy with a specialization in couples therapy at Northcentral University.

Written by Jennifer Behnke

TWLOHA Announces Tour Dates

Melbourne, FL – August 6, 2018 – To Write Love on Her Arms (TWLOHA) is thrilled to announce three dates of “An Evening With To Write Love on Her Arms.” The tour will run from September 18-20, hitting Tampa, FL, Gainesville, FL, and Atlanta, GA, respectively. The evening will consist of TWLOHA founder Jamie Tworkowski speaking, plus performances by two-time National Poetry Slam champion, Sierra DeMulder and musician JP Saxe. For more information, please click here

“After mostly speaking at colleges in recent years, I’m so excited to get back into music venues. These will be small ticketed shows, which represent something new for TWLOHA and for me. If these go well, our goal is to add more dates so that we can bring these nights of hope to folks all over,” shares Tworkowski.

Tickets for all three nights are on sale now. General admission tickets range from $13-$15, and VIP tickets are $40, which includes a pre-show Meet & Greet + Q&A. Further event details are listed below

An Evening with To Write Love on Her Arms:

TAMPA, FL

When: Tuesday, September 18th, 2018

Where: The Attic // 1510 E. 8th Ave.

Time: 7:30PM (Doors @ 7PM)

Tickets: https://twloha.com/events/an-evening-with-to-write-love-on-her-arms/

GAINESVILLE, FL

When: Wednesday, September 19th, 2018

Where: High Dive // 210 SW 2nd Ave.

Time: 9PM (Doors @ 8PM)

Tickets: https://twloha.com/events/an-evening-with-to-write-love-on-her-arms-2/

ATLANTA, GA

When: Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Where: The Masquerade (Heaven) // 50 Lower Alabama St. SW, Suite 22

Time: 8PM (Doors @ 7PM)

Tickets: https://twloha.com/events/an-evening-with-to-write-love-on-her-arms-3/

To Write Love on Her Arms is a nonprofit dedicated to presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and suicide. It exists to encourage, inform, inspire, and also to invest directly into treatment and recovery. Since its start in 2006, TWLOHA has donated over $2.1 million directly into treatment and recovery and answered over 200,000 messages from over 100 countries.

This past September, TWLOHA wrapped its 6th annual campaign to honor National Suicide Prevention Week and World Suicide Prevention Day. The organization was overwhelmed by the amount of love and support shown during this year’s campaign, titled, “Stay. Find what you are made for,“during which over $103.5K was raised for treatment and counseling. The campaign was shared by supporters all over the world, including NBA player Kyle Korver, US Women’s National Soccer Team stars Alex Morgan, Christen Press, and Ashlyn Harris, actress Shantel VanSanten, Switchfoot‘s Jon Foreman, Dustin Kensrue of Thrice, actress and singer Debby Ryan, The Ready Set‘s Jordan Witzrigreuter, and Jess Bowen of The Summer Set, all of whom were featured in a special video message directed by Dustin Miller, a Florida-based filmmaker and longtime TWLOHA collaborator: https://youtu.be/37cB2CQt_YA.