Posts tagged with "abstract"

Camille Hannah, Olsen Gruin, art, design, 360 MAGAZINE, Australia

Camille Hannah

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present The Sixteen Pleasures, a solo exhibition by Australian artist Camille HannahThe Sixteen Pleasures will be on view at Olsen Gruin from October 9 – November 9, 2019. The exhibition design leads viewers with subtle intensity through a dynamic installation of variously scaled paintings and mirrors. During this journey, reflected glimpses of the self coalesce with Hannah’s paintings, creating spillage between the territories that define body and artwork. Enveloped and embraced within these abstract landscapes, viewers experience a bodily extension: a potent sensation which exceeds rational grasp.

By traversing this alluring amalgamation of imagery, the viewer becomes both witness and participant in the creation of these compelling ‘virtual’ paintings. These seductive, enigmatic images of desire echo the artist’s ongoing explorations around the expansive, unbounded nature of female desire and of the carnal disruption inherent to perceptual experience in the digital realm.

The Sixteen Pleasures also evokes the sensory experience of film, video and the mesmerizing back-lit screens that saturate our modern world. It is richly infused with the artist’s extensive enquiries into art history, philosophy, poetry, sexuality and contemporary culture, filtered through the personal narrative of each individual viewer. With this exhibition Hannah aims to create a boundless, all-encompassing landscape in which the viewer is captivated by an exhilarating and thought-provoking, physiological experience.

Camille Hannah attained a Masters of Fine Art by Research in 2013 and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in 2010, at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne, Australia where she was the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Scholarship Award. In 2018 she won the Wyndham Art Prize, and in 2017 was selected as a finalist for the Arte Laguna Prize, Nappa Arsenale, Venice, Italy and as winner of the Special Exhibition Prize of a solo exhibition at Galerie Isabelle Lesmeister, Regensburg, Germany in 2018. In 2015 she was selected by an international jury to win the T.I.N.A. Art Prize, Maurizio Caldirola Arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy, and was a finalist & winner of the People’s Choice Award in the Gold Coast Art Prize, Qld, Australia. Hannah was shortlisted in 2014 for Contemporary Visions V, Beers Contemporary Gallery, London, and in 2012 she won the Kozica-O’Callaghan Award for Painting. Other awards include the Premio Ora Art Prize, Italy 2013 International Catalogue and being shortlisted for the Arte Laguna Art Prize, Venice Arsenale, Italy and the Wynne Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2012.

Kevin Bourgeois: Wall Of Sound

Olsen Gruin announces Wall of Sound, an exhibition featuring music-inspired multimedia works by Kevin Bourgeois. The anticipated show comprises a curated selection of collage and acrylic compositions on wood panel.

Music has always been an intrinsic element in Bourgeois’ creative process and daily routine. “I consider it a universal cultural language with many diverse incarnations and forms,” he affirms. Wall of Sound turns its focus toward the visual art that complements the vast lexicon of music.

The phrase “Wall of Sound” was originally devised to describe Phil Spector’s production methods. According to Spector, the aim was “to create a dense aesthetic critical shorthand, mixed well enough that the audience would then perceive each of the different combinations as one distinct sound or form.” This concept mirrors the augmenting process Bourgeois implemented in creating this body of work.

Through collage Bourgeois seeks to transform the literal imagery of each album’s formal narrative. His process of embellishment and jigsaw remixing of multiple record jacket sources results in an alternative visual dialogue and imbues an abstracted or figurative aesthetic to be interpreted by the viewer.

The Untitled Space × Defining Form

DEFINING FORM
A Group Show of Sculpture Curated by Indira Cesarine

RECEPTION: July 11, 2018
VIP + PRESS PREVIEW (by invitation) 4pm – 6pm //
OPENING RECEPTION 6pm – 9pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
July 11, 2018 – August 1, 2018

THE UNTITLED SPACE

45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W New York, NY 10013

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “DEFINING FORM,” a group exhibition of contemporary artists exploring 2 and 3-dimensional sculpture opening on July 11, 2018 and on view through August 1st, 2018. Curated by Indira Cesarine, “DEFINING FORM” takes a comprehensive look at the manifestations of contemporary sculpture today, engaging a dialogue of the narratives resonating amongst sculptors through works in mediums such as metal, stone, clay, wood, glass, textiles, recycled and repurposed materials, as well as mixed media.

DEFINING FORM presents figurative and abstract works by over 50 emerging and established artists. The group show investigates progressive themes in sculpture, including contemporary feminism, gender identity and political art, as well as new technologies in digital sculpture, with an emphasis on originality and innovative usage of materials. Technological advances in fabrication and digital sculpture have had a massive impact on the art form over the past few decades. Classic techniques such as chiseling stone and casting in bronze have shifted towards new technologies such as 3-D printing, materials such as silicone, plastics, and textiles as well as found, recycled and re-purposed materials. The domination of large-scale works has given way to delicate and intimate pieces as well as a wave of sculptural installations that deconstruct notions of space and form. Artists are pushing the boundaries of the art form integrating components of sound, video, light and performance as well as painting, photography and other mediums.

As the art form evolves in new directions with the impact of contemporary culture, it has transcended from the conventional portrait to works that challenge the status quo, address gender identity and racial stereotypes, LGBTQ ideologies and queer constructs, explore themes of the resistance movement as well as progressive feminist narratives and activism. Exhibit DEFINING FORM presents the new narrative of sculpture with works that interrogate ideologies of the art form, pushing forward experimental works that engage all of our senses and ignite fresh dialogues.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS

Alexandra Rubinstein, Andres Bardales, Ann Lewis, Arlene Rush, Barb Smith, Christina Massey, Colin Radcliffe, Cristin Millett, Daria Zhest, Desire Rebecca Moheb, Dévi Loftus, Elektra KB, Elizabeth Riley, Emily Elliott, Gracelee Lawrence, Hazy Mae, Indira Cesarine, Jackie Branson, Jamia Weir, Jasmine Murell, Jen Dwyer, Jennifer Garcia, Jess DeWahls, Jocelyn Braxton Armstrong, Jonathan Rosen, Kacy Jung, Kate Hush, Kelsey Bennett, Laura Murray, Leah Gonzales, Lola Ogbara, Maia Radanovic, Manju Shandler, Meegan Barnes, Michael Wolf, Nicole Nadeau, Olga Rudenko, Rachel Marks, Rebecca Goyette, Ron Geibel, Ronald Gonzalez, Roxi Marsen, Sandra Erbacher, Sarah Maple, Seunghwui Koo, Shamona Stokes, Sophia Wallace, Stephanie Hanes, Storm Ascher, Suzanne Wright, Tatyana Murray, Touba Alipour, Whitney Vangrin, Zac Hacmon

CURATORIAL STATEMENT

“What is sculpture today? I invited artists of all genders and generations to present their most innovative 2 and 3-dimensional sculptures for consideration for DEFINING FORM. After reviewing more than 600 artworks, I selected sculptures by over 50 artists that reflect new tendencies in the art form. DEFINING FORM artists defy stereotypes with inventive works that tackle contemporary culture. Traditionally highly male dominated, I was inspired by the new wave of female sculptors making their mark with works engaging feminist narratives. The artworks in DEFINING FORM explode with new ideas, vibrant colors, and display a thoroughly modern sensibility through fearless explorations of the artists and unique usage of innovative materials ranging from fabric, plastic, and foam to re-purposed and found objects including chewing gum, trash and dirt. Recycled materials are celebrated along with works engaging new digital technologies. The exhibit displays works that are politically charged, contrasted with those full of satire and humor. In the investigation of new tendencies, I felt it was important to juxtapose figurative works with the abstract, new materials with the classics, creating an immersive exhibit that defines new trends in sculpture and contemporary constructs of the art form.” – Indira Cesarine

Official Exhibit Website: http://untitled-space.com/defining-form-a-group-show-of-sculpture

The Untitled Space

www.untitled-space.com

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BEYOND THE VEIL × ADAM KNIGHT

BEYOND THE VEIL

CURATED BY ADAM KNIGHT

EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE
EVELYN PULTARA
GABRIELLA POSSUM NUNGARRAYI
GAYLA PWERLE
POLLY NGALE
THE WOMEN’S COLLABORATIVE

Opening Reception:

May 16, 6-8PM

Exhibition:
May 16 – Jul 8, 2018

Emily Kame Kngwarreye
Untitled, 1991
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
58.8 x 35.2 ”  (149.4 x 89.4 cm)

Evelyn Pultara
Bush Yam, 2015
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
35.8 x 48.4 ”  (90.9 x 122.9 cm)

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present Beyond the Veil, a group exhibition of Western Desert Paintings curated by the President of the Aboriginal Art Association of Australia, Adam Knight. The anticipated show features select works by Emily Kame KngwarreyeEvelyn Pultara, Gabriella Possum NungurrayiGayla PwerlePolly Ngale, and the Women’s Collaborative comprising Beverly Cameron; Kathy Marinkga, Imitjala Curley, and Tjangili George, and will be on view from May 16 – July 8, 2018.

Beyond the Veil celebrates the divine use of dots by Australian Aboriginal artists. It honors the unique method of layering and the shimmering presence of dots throughout the whole of each canvas by the true inventors of this now praised artistic style. As Aboriginal art further secures its place as a significant movement in the international art world, it is undeniable that non-indigenous artists from around the globe will find inspiration within these prized works.

It is widely accepted that Australian Aboriginals have the oldest continuous culture on the planet. The rise of contemporary Australian Aboriginal art was described by art critic and writer Robert Hughes, as “the last great art movement of the twentieth century.” Whilst the works are considered contemporary, they are derived from a cultural awareness and sacred knowledge that remains preserved by artists such as those exhibited here.

Beyond the Veil aims to remind viewers of the cultural narrative that celebrates the presence of the dot and acknowledges the genius of its use by its originators: the artists from Australia’s first people.

For further information please contact the gallery at info@olsengruin.com or at +1.646.525.6213.  All images are subject to copyright. Gallery approval must be granted prior to reproduction.

Emily Kame Kngwarreye
Untitled, 1993
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
23.6 x 35 ”  (59.9 x 88.9 cm)

olsengruin.com

Olsen Gruin

30 Orchard St, New York NY 10002

M: +1 646 525 6213

emerald@olsengruin.com

Wednesday–Sunday 11am–6pm

Rilke Guillén

Rilke Guillén 

Artist Plásticomexicanocatalán, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, of thinking and feeling. He has exhibited his work in Spain and Mexico for many decades. 

Artist statement

I believe to express my vision of this splendor-decadent world that witnesses our existence, to try to move in the emotion of the viewer, to make him see inside yes; by the right and the reverse of the same glove of what is and exists and of what is not and also exists. Like the dream inside the eye and the outside eye. Like the truth and vertigo of the depth of the fractal-cosmic spiral. As a picture, as truth, as the line that springs from my pen. Creating images and sculptures gives meaning to my existence and being me from the inside-out, so I can communicate with others. I am an insatiable explorer of the plastic techniques that I am encountering in my path, such as painting, watercolor, engraving, sculpture, design, etc. My search in these different lands has the same objective: to find the voice that is capable of taking out this animal-human being, who is thronging in my heart. The fine perfume of the flower of my spirit.

Biography 

I remember as a child drawing horses and birds obsessively. The representation of images has always seemed to me as a matter that holds great power, as if in representing an object or being, somehow one was made with his skill, with his unique quality. I have always been surrounded by art. My father, in his poetic dimension, attracted artists from all disciplines to the house to share his presence and talent, some of them had a great impact on me. There was a very special one that made me the honor of taking me as a disciple for a short but unforgettable time: The great teacher Rodolfo Zanabria (who in peace rides in infinity with his maidens with long hair and beautiful faces). From him, I learned that the road is long and if you know how to walk you will reach the Magical Domain. Destiny had the willingness to be a Mexican-Catalan artist, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, thinking and feeling. This has allowed me to exhibit and share my work on both sides of the Atlantic since my debut on the plastic scene, until today. 

For more artworks, visit here

Joy Moser

Night Cloud #11, Joy Moser

Teachers College, Columbia University to Exhibit Abstract Sky-scapes by Faculty Member Joy Moser
  
WHAT: 

“Night Clouds,” an Exhibit of Abstract Paintings of the Natural World

WHO: 

Joy Moser, Artist and Adjunct Professor, Teachers College, Columbia University

WHEN: 

September 5-28

Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; 

Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.


WHERE: 

Teachers College, Columbia University

Macy Gallery
4th Floor, Macy Hall (Room 444)
120th and Broadway, New York City

(Night Cloud #21, Joy Moser)

BACKGROUND: Joy Moser, a painter and longtime adjunct professor at Teachers College, started out as an abstract painter, switched for a time to more naturalistic landscapes, and with the “Night Clouds” exhibit at Teachers College in September, returns to abstraction. “Landscapes are tricky,” Moser says. “If you’re not careful, you can end up painting sappy calendar pictures. What I wanted was the mystery – to take you someplace you want to go but can’t quite figure out. So I’m excited to be going back to abstraction.”
 
Moser’s sky-scapes are anything but sappy. Her clouds are massive, unknown life forms caught in rare close-ups, in motion against often ominous blues. Like an eclipse, you can imagine them causing people across different states and countries to stop on street corners to look up, eyes shaded, with a mixture of awe and dread.
 
“Painting in general, and landscape in particular, has a kind of universality,” says Moser, who came to TC in 1992 at the request of faculty member Judith Burton to teach for a single semester and never left. “Unlike books or film, they don’t need translation. And with all the terrible stuff going on in the world, that’s a good thing.”
 
Admission to the exhibition is free of charge