Posts tagged with "360 Magazine"

Purdue University x Flu Vaccines

Influenza, measles, mumps and coronavirus COVID-19 are illnesses people hear about on a regular basis.

While coronavirus is relatively new and does not yet have a vaccine, the others all can be prevented or at least have their severity reduced by simply getting a vaccination, says Libby Richards, an associate professor of nursing in Purdue’s School of Nursing.

“It’s important to review your vaccination records with your health care provider,” she says. “Vaccinations aren’t just for kids. Adults need them, too. The vaccinations needed for adults depends on a few things, such as age and health history. Vaccines help your immune system fight infections faster and more effectively.”

A flu vaccination is particularly important, especially during severe flu seasons. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced in its latest flu update on Feb. 14 that flu activity is still at a high level. Since October, at least 26 million Americans have suffered from the flu, resulting in the deaths of at least 14,000 adults and 92 children.

While flu vaccinations must be done annually, Richards says that the effectiveness of other vaccinations adults received as children diminish over time, so they might find themselves no longer protected. “Pertussis – whooping cough — and tetanus vaccines are perfect examples of vaccines that require booster shots throughout one’s life.”

Common vaccinations include, but are not limited to, shingles, pneumonia, Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis) influenza, MMR (measles, mumps, rubella), hepatitis A, hepatitis B and human papillomavirus, more commonly known as HPV.

Shingles vaccines are good for five years and are recommended for adults 50 and older. Pneumonia vaccines are recommended by the CDC for those 65 and older and should provide lifetime protection. A booster is needed for tetanus and diphtheria every 10 years. Hepatitis A and B vaccines protect against some liver infections resulting in exposure to infected body fluids or food and water; each have different vaccination requirements.

“Talk to your health care provider to see what you need and when you need it,” Richards says. “Vaccinations can save lives by helping prevent or limit a disease or illness.”

Related Releases:
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Suffering from the flu? Just stay at home
Balancing flu risks and death while everyone’s talking about coronavirus

AIWAYS New Concept Sketches

AIWAYS, the Shanghai-based personal mobility provider, has published the first sketches of its U6ion electric crossover coupe concept, ahead of the model’s global debut at the 2020 Geneva International Motor Show (GIMS) next month.

The U6ion previews a second all-electric SUV from AIWAYS, based on the same MAS (More Adaptable Structure) platform as its U5 sibling.

Under the tutelage of Ken Okuyama, creator of the Ferrari Enzo and former Pininfarina design chief, and now chief advisor for design and arts at AIWAYS, the company has created a form language which embodies the ‘intelligent and simplified technology’ at the heart of AIWAYS product development ethos.

AIWAYS chief designer Dongfei Luo commented: “The U6ion sketches present a crossover coupe with a harmonious and exciting body shape, aimed at attracting young car users looking for a zero-emission SUV that offers style, practicality and electric performance.”

The U6ion will be presented to media and the public for the first time during GIMS. The AIWAYS press conference takes place at 13:15 on press day (Tuesday 3 March, Hall 2, Stand No. 2121).

AIWAYS, Auto, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

african, art, spiritual, museum, exhibition, Phyllis Galembo, rituals,

African Masquerade Exhibition

Major photography exhibition (Now on view until May 31). Meet the artist on May 17 at 3:00 p.m. at the Museum for a special appearance (lecture and book signing)

Museum goers will be spellbound by the transformative power of the African masquerade, as the Boca Raton Museum of Art presents Phyllis Galembo:Maske. Her striking photographic series of contemporary mask rituals has drawn national and international critical acclaim. These large-scale images are nearly life-size and explore spiritual realms with brilliant, mesmerizing colors.For more than 30 years, the artist has traveled around the world to photograph participants in contemporary masquerade events that range from traditional, religious ceremonies to secular celebrations.

The exhibition is now on view through May 31. Galembo will visit the museum on May 17 at 3:00 p.m. to share personal stories about her work and her travels, the ritual mask ceremonies, and will sign two of her books at this personal appearance–Maske (published by Aperture), and Mexico, Masks and Rituals (by Radius Books and DAP). Her portraits are celebrated by the world’s leading fine art photography editors for their stunning resonance, setting her work apart from documentary and anthropological studies.

Galembo’s Art Work:

Otoghe-Toghe, by Phyllis Galembo. Aromgba Village, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

Awo-O-Dudu (A Spirit They Saw), by Phyllis Galembo. Freetown, Sierra Leone, (2008), Ilfochrome.

Akata Dance Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Cross River, Nigeria (2004), Ilfochrome

They will be shown in concert with the Museum’s historical collection of more than 40 African tribal artifacts and indigenous masks in the gallery across from Galembo’s show, for a complementary perspective.

Through her lens, the viewer gains special access to the rarely seen other-worlds, as she captures the raw and sometimes frightening aspects of ceremonial garb. Masking is a complex, mysterious and profound tradition in which the participants transcend the physical world and enter the spiritual realm.

In her vibrant images, Galembo exposes an ornate code of political, artistic, theatrical, social, and religious symbolism and commentary. She has made over twenty trips to sites of ritual masquerades, capturing cultural performances with a subterranean political edge. Her photographs depict the physical character, costumes, and rituals of African religious practices and their diasporic manifestations in the Caribbean and Mexico. Galembo’s images reflect both the modern and ancient worlds.The fifteen portraits by Galembo that were selected for this exhibition reveal the meticulous detail and creative imagination of mask-making.

Affianwan, by Phyllis Galembo. Calibar South, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

“The tradition of masquerading is universal and timeless, and continues today in most cultures, including western societies,” says Irvin Lippman, the Executive Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

“Bringing together the Galembo photographs and masks from the Museum’s African collection underscores the cross-cultural complexity of meaning and purpose. However, what they have in common is their vitality, power, and boldness of humanity.”

Aye Loja (The World is a Market Place that we Visit), Gelede Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Agonli Village, Benin, (2006)

The costumes in Galembo’s photographs are worn in several types of modern-day rituals. They are created to summon ancestral spirits and deities during a range of events, including agricultural hardships,
land disputes, rites of passage, funerals, harvests, moments of gratitude and celebration. Galembo’s large-scale portraits in this exhibition capture the mask-oriented cultural traditions of Nigeria, Benin, Ghana and Sierra Leone.

Banana Leaf Masquerade, EkongIkon Ukom, by Phyllis Galembo. Calabar, Nigeria (2005), Ilfochrome

While traveling and embedding herself for long periods in these societies, Galembo works with local assistants and translators.They negotiate the terms with elders, so that she may be granted permission
to make photos of these masqueraders.

“The translators often find that gaining permission from community leaders can sometimes be quite helpful during these painstaking negotiations,”says Galembo. “Once an agreement has been struck, I set my own lighting and place the subjects in front of a neutral backdrop that enables the eye to focus on the diversity of materials in each costume.”

Two in a Fancy Dress, Red Cross Masquerade Group, by Phyllis Galembo. Winneba, Ghana, (2010), Ilfochrome

The masks and costumes in these photographs are made from a wide variety of surprising materials ─ leaves, grass, patterned fabrics, burlap sacks, full-bodied crocheted yarns, colored raffia, quills, shells, and even lizard excrement. All of her photographs are shot as portraits rather than during the act of ritual. She is allowed to photograph her subjects at the very moment right before their rituals and festivities commence. Galembo prefers her colors to be brightly saturated, enhancing the spiritual and transformative powers of these garments. “I never see my subjects out of costume, although the masqueraders are always men, often paying homage to women,” adds Galembo.

Ekpeyong Edet Dance Group, by Phyllis Galembo. Etikpe Village, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

Despite secularization and fading traditions, masquerading in Africa is abundant, robust, and far from disappearing. Most of the photographs in this exhibition reflect sacred rituals, the spiritual aspect of masquerading rather than secular celebrations.By donning garments, the masqueraders gain access to traditional knowledge, enabling them to relay critical messages to the community.

Egungun, by Phyllis Galembo. Adandokpodji Village, Benin, (2006), Ilfochrome

“I like the way viewers can grasp the real stories behind each image. Every mask, costume and fiber of material can represent so much to the people in these portraits. Many of these subjects created these ritual costumes because a spirit inspired them. These are people who make masks and costumes that are very spiritually motivated,” says Galembo. The modern world also finds its way into these costumes and masks with the usage of plastic bags, cardboard, and found objects.

Ringo (Big Deer) Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Kroo Bay, Sierra Leone,(2008)

Awo-O-dudu (A Spirit They Saw) reveals a ghost- like shape summoning ancestral spirits during the dry months or times of crisis, when spirits are called to bless the deceased and entire villages.Ko S’Ogbon L’Ate (You Can’t Buy Wisdom at the Market) is a tribute to mothers, goddesses and ancestors. The wooden headpieces represent an animal and a human, each sings a different song during the ritual. Affianwan (“white cat woman”) represents spirit and transparency. The stunning headdress of this work is crocheted from one long flowing piece of fabric. Two in a Fancy Dress and Rasta illustrates the cross of African and European traditions (fancy dress).

More About the Artist: Phyllis Galembo

Phyllis Galembo’s photographs are included in numerous public and private collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the New York Public Library. She is represented by Axis Gallery. She was born 1952 in New York, where she continues to live and work. Galembo graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1977 and has been a Professor Emeritus at Albany, State University of New York since 1978. Using a direct, unaffected portrait style, she captures her subjects informally posed but often beautifully attired in traditional and ritualistic dress.

Attuned to a moment’s collision of past, present and future, Phyllis Galembo is recognized for her ability to find the timeless elegance and dignity of her subjects.She highlights the creativity of the individuals morphing into a fantastical representation of themselves, having cobbled together materials gathered from the immediate environment to idealize their vision of mythical figures.

While still pronounced in their personal identity, the subject’s intentions are rooted in the larger dynamics of religious, political and cultural affiliation. Establishing these connections is the artist’s hallmark. Her work has appeared in Tar Magazine, Damn Magazine, Photograph and Harpers. She has been profiled on CNN, NPR Radio and NBC Today.

Other collections that feature her work include: Oceania and the Americas, Photography Study Collection (New York); the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Houston Museum of Art; the International Center for Photography(New York); the British Art Museum, Yale University; Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library; Polaroid Corporation (Boston); and the Rockefeller Foundation, among many others.

MORE ABOUT THE MUSEUM’S AFRICAN COLLECTION

Complementing Galembo’s exhibition are more than 40 African tribal artifacts from the Museum’s collection, including headdresses and masks, each pertaining to masquerades and ceremonies. These are exhibited in an adjacent gallery, across from the Galembo show.

Pictured above are some of the historic African masks from the Museum’s collection that complement Galembo’s contemporary photographs. More than 40 African tribal artifacts will be shown in an adjacent gallery across from Galembo’s exhibition.

The two Kuba masks in the collection (Kuba Bwoom Mask and Kuba Ngaady-A Mwash Mask) are both from the Democratic Republic of Congo, recreating the Kuba dynastic history.

Another work in the museum’s African collection, a Bamana Headdress (Chiwara), represents a mythical character who taught humans to turn wild grasses into grain.

A Mossi Nakomse Headdress (Zazaido), is used in secular and religious rituals by young men. The Zazaido masquerade honors male and female elders at funeral ceremonies, and blesses survivors.

A Yoruba Crown from Nigeria is worn on state occasions, and reflects the spiritual connections of the ruler. The face represents his royal lineage and ultimately the god Oduduwa, who remained on earth and became their first king.

The collection also includes a Dan mask (Deangle), an Ogoni Mask (Nigeria), a Toma Mask (Landai), a Senufo Mask (Kpelie), a Guru Mask (Gu), an Igbo Crest Mask (Nigeria), and a Yoruba Oro Efe Gelede Mask (Nigeria/Republic of Benin).

ABOUT THE BOCA RATON MUSEUM OF ART

Celebrating our 70th anniversary in 2020, the Boca Raton Museum of Art
encompasses a creative campus that includes the Museum in Mizner Park,
Art School, and an Artists Guild. As the “Official Art Museum of the City of
Boca Raton, “the Museum has provided seven decades of cultural and artistic service to the community, and to many visitors from around the world. Open–10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. on Thursdays; and 12:00-5:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

Visit HERE for more information.

African, Art, Museum, Phyllis Galembo, Spiritual, Realm, tradition, African, Art, Museum, Phyllis Galembo, Spiritual, Realm, tradition,

comics, mutant, zombies, fighting, actions, alien, marvel, New York,

X-MEN × EMPYRE Event

IT’S ALIEN PLANTS VS MUTANT ZOMBIES IN EMPYRE: X-MEN!

New York, NY- February 19, 2020 – It’s going to be a battle so monumental that it’ll take the entire writing crew of the X-Men to depict it! The intergalactic visitors coming to Earth in Marvel’s 2020 event will be arriving just in time to face off against an army of mutant undead this May in EMPYRE: X-MEN. Don’t miss the X-Men’s strange return to Genosha in this unpredictable series written by all your favorite current X-Men writers. It all begins in EMPYRE: X-MEN #1 written by Head of X Jonathan Hickman and writer of Excalibur, Tini Howard, and continues in EMPYRE: X-MEN #2 written by Gerry Duggan (Marauders), Benjamin Percy (X-Force, Wolverine), and Leah Williams, writer of the highly anticipated series, X-Factor.

Event Information

EMPYRE: X-MEN 1 (of 4)

Written by JONATHAN HICKMAN & TINI HOWARD

Art by MATTEO BUFFAGNI

Cover by MIKE MCKONE

EMPYRE: X-MEN 2 (of 4)

Written by GERRY DUGGAN, BENJAMIN PERCY, & LEAH WILLIAMS

Art by LUCAS WERNECK

To find a comic shop near you, visit HERE

About Marvel Entertainment

Marvel Entertainment, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is one of the world’s most prominent character-based entertainment companies, built on a proven library of more than 8,000 characters featured in a variety of media for over eighty years. Marvel utilizes its character franchises in entertainment, licensing, publishing, games, and digital media.

For more information visit HERE

Duke Deuce, Artist, Singer, Song, Rapper, Rap, Music, talent,

Duke Deuce × Quality Control Music

DUKE DEUCE DROPS NEW TAPE ON QUALITY CONTROL MUSIC/YRN

STREAM MEMPHIS MASSACRE 2— HERE
WATCH THE “CRUNK AINT DEAD REMIX” VIDEO FT. LIL JON, PROJECT PAT & JUICY J–HERE

Feedbacks from the public

“The fact that his record was co-signed by fellow Memphis stars, Project Pat and Juicy J, is a telling sign that Duke Deuce is truly on the rise.” – HYPEBEAST

“2020 could be Duke Deuce’s year” -CLASH

“Although it won’t be long until fans move on to the next hottest hip-hop dance, something tells us Duke Deuce has the star power and quality music to ride this moment for a whole lot longer” – COMPLEX

“Already showing the ability to stand out on the timeline, and with the support of Quality Control, Duke might just be ready to take off.” – LYRICAL LEMONADE

“He’s the best parts of every era of Memphis while being in tune with the new generation of rap.” – FLOSS MAG

Breakout Memphis Rapper

Duke Deuce drops his hotly anticipated new tape, Memphis Massacre 2 on Quality Control Music/YRN, the follow up to 2018’s Memphis Massacre. Listen to Memphis Massacre 2 HERE. Watch the video for “Crunk Ain’t Dead Remix (feat. Lil Jon, Juicy J, Project Pat)” HERE. Duke has been on a steady rise catching attention for bringing back an era of crunk music that originated in Memphis but became popular out of Atlanta.

Duke grew up around the sound and recalls the likes of Three6Mafia,8Ball, and MJG as influences as well as his father Duke Nitty who produced the Memphis classic “S.O.U.T.H. Parkway” by Gangsta Blac. Duke Nitty is also credited as a producer for few tracks on MM2. The album sees Duke navigate through diverse production and multiple styles like a veteran. An energetic listen over 12 tracks that could only be made by someone that lives and breathes this scene. It’s a true come up for a rising star in rap. Alongside his music, Duke’s unique dance moves are part of what brought him to Quality Control. After Offset saw one of Duke’s videos, he flew him out to the studio to meet and ended up signing him to QC. Gaining co-signs from the whole QC family as well as Cardi B, Duke Deuce is quickly becoming a recognizable name in the space. Late last year Duke released the video for “Crunk Ain’t Dead,” now at over 10 million views on YouTube.

Following its success, hip-hop legends Lil Jon, Juicy J, and Project Pat hopped on a remix that released just last week. Duke commented on working with them, “It was legendary working beside guys I listened to as a kid growing up in Memphis in the studio with my dad.”

MEMPHIS MASSACRE 2 TRACKLISTING

1. FEEL LIKE IT (PROD. BY DENAROLOVE)
2. BHZ (PROD. BY HITT KIDD & CHASE THE MONEY)
3. CRUNK AIN’T DEAD REMIX (FT. LIL JON, PROJECT PAT, JUICY J)
4. ON ME (PROD.HITTKIDD
5.FAT MAC (PROD. BY DUKE NITTY)
6. BAD NEWS (PROD. BY DUKENITTY)
7. TRAP BLUES (PROD. BY CHEFERY)
8. CRUNK AIN’T DEAD MOB – DUKE DEUCE, LIL THAD, LIL YACHTY
9. BODY (PROD. BY EVIL G)
10. DUKE FLOW (PROD. BY PYREX WHIPPA)
11. LOCK DOORS (PROD. BY PYREX WHIPPA)
12. BIG DOG (PROD. BY STASH 808)

FOLLOW DUKE DEUCE
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Twitter

Youtube

illustration, 360 MAGAZINE, Alejandra Villagra

The Decline of Black Media

Spokesperson for the Save Journalism Project, Nick Charles, has a new op-ed in the NY Daily News discussing the impact of Google and Facebook’s decimation of the news industry’s business model and specifically the decline of black media. What were traditionally spaces for communities of color to spread news and ideas are being forced to shutter their newsrooms because of big tech’s stranglehold on the industry, resulting in a lack of representation and a rapid decline of coverage for these communities.

As Charles explains, “revenue from digital advertising, which used to go to news publishers, is more often than not in big tech’s pockets, leading to an unchecked balance of power and gaping holes in local news coverage nationwide… Informing African-American communities should be put before Facebook and Google’s profits. People of color have worked and died so American democracy includes everyone. But there is no democracy, no freedom, without the fourth estate.”

Charles’ op-ed is below and available online.

Some remember well the world where events, issues, policies and histories impacting black people were rarely acknowledged or reported by the mainstream press. In New York City, if it happened above 96th St., it wasn’t news. That began to change after the urban riots of the late 1960s and the Kerner Commission, which prompted mainstream media to begin hiring African-American reporters. African-American media, which had always filled the breach, did hemorrhage talent, but continued invaluable community coverage.

With the emergence of the internet, as legacy media, newspapers, magazines, radio and television news were joined by newer platforms and social media, there was always space to cover disasters like Hurricane Katrina as well as enduring environmental, racial and social injustices. But now that space is shrinking rapidly. McClatchy filing for bankruptcy is just the latest and most ominous example.

An unfettered and thriving press is paramount, especially to otherwise forgotten communities. But what happens when outlets are forced to shutter because big tech chokes off advertising oxygen that is essential to the media’s survival?

Newspapers that adapted and survived the last digital revolution did so through advertising. But today’s digital ad market is dominated by Google and Facebook. Revenue from digital advertising, which used to go to news publishers, is more often than not in big tech’s pockets, leading to an unchecked balance of power and gaping holes in local news coverage nationwide.

Google recently announced it was doing away with third-party cookies by 2022, further jeopardizing the fate of the voices and publishers of communities of color. The move will hit smaller news outlets hard by substantially reducing the value of advertising on their websites. Most don’t have the kind of first-party information nor the kind of scale that will now be required to be valuable to digital advertisers.

Newsrooms across the country are experiencing layoffs at an alarming rate. In 2019, the media shed over 7,800 jobs. The number of black journalists and reporters in newsrooms has also been impacted, with the number of black journalists working at daily newspapers dropping by 40% since 1997. Countless colleagues have left the profession, taking with them their passion, expertise and the trust they amassed over years with community leaders, politicians and activists.

Unable to keep up with a business model steamrolled by the likes of Facebook and Google, the industry is reaching the point of no return. Big tech’s dominance over the digital ad market and unrivaled capacity to scale and monetize its platforms is having drastic effects on journalism as a whole — with especially profound impact on communities of color.

Black legacy outlets, home to some of the most committed journalists and activists in our country’s history, have been the bulwark of accountability for many when racial tensions kept even the government from its role in protecting its citizens. The Chicago Defender itself was one of the sparks in The Great Migration.

Alongside downsizing and retracting their print editions, examples like the Amsterdam News showed a 21% drop in circulation from 2014-2015; The Chicago Defender’s circulation fell by 18% in 2015. Not only are black communities losing their news outlets, black perspectives across the news industry are losing the spaces to voice their opinions.

Founded in 1943 and for decades a space for black communities to share the most pressing news and ideas of the time, Alabama’s longest-running black newspaper, the Mobile Beacon, reported it was planning to close its doors after 2019. It is one of many black legacy media icons in jeopardy.

Frederick Douglass once said: “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.” Informing African-American communities should be put before Facebook and Google’s profits. People of color have worked and died so American democracy includes everyone. But there is no democracy, no freedom, without the fourth estate.

Charles, a freelance writer, works with Save Journalism Project.

Journalism in America is facing an existential threat from the monopolistic control of tech giants like Google, Facebook, and Apple. Big tech’s dominance over the digital advertising market and their unrivaled capacity to monetize its platforms are having drastic effects on journalism as a whole.

https://savejournalism.org/

bracelets, jewelry, accessories, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

How to Buy Gold Bracelet for Women 

Gold is not only beautiful, but it’s also friendly to wear. This explains why gold bracelets for women hardly ever go out of style. 

Gold is a unique precious metal that’s durable and specially designed to retain value over time. 

Often buying gold jewelry is considered to be an investment because it doesn’t come cheap. 

A well maintained gold bracelet for women can last for many generations. 

If you love gold jewelry, knowing how to buy gold jewelry helps you get the most value from your purchase. 

What’s the Impact of Purity on Value?

A genuine gold bracelet for women will come with a specific figure to indicate how much pure gold it contains in percentage. 

This could range anywhere from 10K, 14K, and 18K. The letter K represents karat. The higher the karat, the more expensive the jewelry piece will be. 

Let’s take a detailed look at the karat percentage.

  • If your jewelry is indicated 24K, it means it’s pure gold
  • 18K jewelry comprises 18 parts of gold and 6 parts one or more extra metals. This makes it 75% gold.
  • 14K jewelry comes with 14 parts of gold and 12 parts of one or more metals which makes it 50% gold. 
  • 10K jewelry contains 10 parts of gold and 14 parts one or more metals and this makes it 41.7%gold. 
  • 10 karat in the lowest karat that can be said to be gold in the US. 

Commonly Sold Gold Jewelry

You’re likely to find gold bracelets for women in various jewelry stores in the US. 

If the jewelry you buy is less than 14 karats, it means that it can only be valuable for a short period. 

It’s worth mentioning that the higher the gold content, the more influence it shall make in the market. 

Apart from gold content, there are various factors to consider to determine how valuable your jewelry pieces are. 

Here are some of them. 

Understand European Markings

European gold bracelets for women are marked with numbers that show the percentage of gold. You need to understand them, especially when you’re buying classic gold jewelry. 

Understand other Markings on your Gold Jewelry

Karat branding on your gold jewelry should come with a trademark that can help you determine the manufacturer. 

The product’s country of origin is usually indicated in some jewelry as well. Make sure the gold jewelry you choose has been certified for gold content before you can buy it. 

Why mix Gold with other Metals?

Knowing about gold alloys can come in handy to help you in your search for gold jewelry. 

Remember, pure gold is usually soft and this means that wearing it every day is impractical. 

Other metals are usually combined with gold to enhance its durability. Such jewelry often comes at a low price. 

Mixing gold with different metals enables metallurgists to change its color. For instance, nickel and palladium can be mixed with gold to produce white gold. 

Combining gold with copper creates a pink or rose tint. Doing so with silver produces a green cast 

When metals are combined with gold, the result is an alloy. This is a bent combination of metals which can be quite expensive. 

Solid gold is a term used to define jewelry that contains a minimum of 10 karats of gold in the US

Gold Used as a Coating

There are various ways of applying gold coating in a less expensive metal and this reduces its cost. 

Remember, if your jewelry comes with an overly thick layer of gold you shouldn’t wear it daily. Doing so exposes your gold bracelet to wear and tear. 

Finally 

Plated or gold filled jewelry is ideal for the jewelry you plan to wear occasionally. 

However, don’t think about it as an investment. Daily use of these pieces increases wear and tear which in turn exposes bottom part of the metal. 

This could stain your skin and eventually trigger an allergic reaction. 

If you’re looking for the best gold bracelets for women that will be durable, you should invest in the highest quality gold you can afford. 

road, uber, car, traffic, illustration, car-sharing,

Uber Decreases Traffic Injuries Rate in the UK

An Important Study

University of Oxford researchers has found that ride-hailing provider,Uber, is associated with a 9% decline in serious road accident injuries in the UK. However, that relative improvement is counterbalanced by the fact that there was an increase in slight road accident injuries in London.

Since its launch in San Francisco in 2010, Uber has experienced henomenal growth, reaching six continents, more than 70 countries, and
700 cities through 2018.  Whilst it took Uber roughly six years to reach the 1 billion ride milestone (March 2016), it took just two and a half more years (September 2018) to reach 10 billion total rides.
                     
Professor David Kirk from the University of Oxford; Department of Sociology and Nuffield College said: “ Ride-hailing is a private sector intervention that may have transformative potential to change the nature of road safety worldwide, yet there has been relatively little research on the potentially beneficial and detrimental effects of ride-hailing for public safety. Our study presents the very first findings of the association between the deployment of Uber and road accident injuries in the UK, thereby adding much needed research to the public debate about the safety of ride-hailing. ”

The Relationship between Uber and Accidents Rates in Great Britain 

This study is a collaboration between researchers at Oxford, Bocconi University, and the University of California-Davis.It exploited differences in the timing of the deployment of Uber across Britain to test the association between the advent of Uber services and rate of fatal and non-fatal accidents in those areas. In Great Britain, road accident fatalities and injuries have steadily declined since the mid-1960s, due in part to efforts to improve road and vehicle safety and limit the extent of drink-driving. Yet progress on reducing road fatalities as well as serious injuries stalled in recent years and even began to reverse course, with serious injuries increasing nearly 12% from 2014 to 2018. Along with suicide and drug overdose, traffic fatalities are among the leading causes of death of 15 to 29 year olds in the UK, as well as worldwide.

Professor Kirk said: “ Expanding the availability and lowering the cost of alternate transportation options should, in theory, reduce the number of drink-driving occurrences and fatalities.Conversely,Uber may actually increase road accidents by increasing the number of vehicles and vehicle miles travelled on Great Britain roads. ”

Kirk, with colleagues Nicolo Cavalli (Bocconi) and Noli Brazil (UC-Davis), found that slight injuries (sprains and bruises) declined outside of London after the rollout of Uber, but increased within London. No statistically significant association between Uber and traffic fatalities  was observed.

The Next Step

 Professor Kirk also said: “ One interpretation for the decline in serious road injuries is that Uber may be a substitute form of transportation for risky drivers, including drink-drivers. However,ride-hailing is also a substitute for public transit, particularly buses, thereby increasing traffic congestion. Our next step is to examine the effect on road traffic accidents following the withdrawal of Uber in cities such as London,where the provider may have lost its licence to operate. We also want to examine the effects of Uber and other ride-hailing competitors in countries besides the US and UK, given that most of the ride-hailing market is in Asia.”

The paper: The Implications of Ridehailing for Risky Driving and Road Accident Injuries and Fatalities is available online at Social Science & Medicine at HERE.

About The University of Oxford

 Oxford University has been placed number 1 in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings for the fourth year running, and at the heart of this success is our ground-breaking research and innovation.

Oxford is world-famous for research excellence and home to some of the most talented people from across the globe. Our work helps the lives of millions, solving real-world problems through a huge network of partnerships and collaborations. The breadth and interdisciplinary nature of our research sparks imaginative and inventive insights and solutions.

Pirelli X New Tire Development Stimulator

Pirelli’s new tire development stimulator reducing lead times by 30% and enhancing sustainability

Pirelli’s new tire simulator, recently introduced at the company’s renowned research and development division in Milan, will reduce development time, as well as the number of physical prototypes needed to create a finished product. The advances achieved by this simulator will further enhance the close working partnerships between the Italian firm and the world’s best-known car manufacturers. The new simulator aims to accelerate development cycles and testing, which will reduce lead times and lead to faster development processes between Pirelli and key producers of prestige and premium vehicles. Courtesy of this cutting-edge technology, Pirelli has achieved a 30% reduction in average development time for new tires, both for the road and motorsports, thanks to the faster assessment of virtual prototypes produced for different car models. The new simulator makes it possible for different development parameters to be remodeled rapidly, leading to a faster exchange of digital information between Pirelli and the world’s car manufacturers.

The new simulator is the latest installment in Pirelli’s far-reaching digitalization strategy.

Compared to traditional development methods, the simulator allows the virtual model of any car, either supplied by the manufacturer or produced internally, to be quickly programmed into the system while
design and development work can also be carried out on the manufacturer’s own simulator. This means that tire development lead times remain in step with those of the cars that they are destined for, an important factor as new vehicle models are coming out more frequently in recent years. Moreover, the use of a simulator to maximize the virtual development phase means that the number of physical prototypes used is reduced, which supports Pirelli’s sustainability policy by minimizing the resulting impact on the environment.

Formula 1 technology takes to the road

Advanced simulation has already been used for more than 10 years during the design and development of Formula 1 and other motorsports tires. This new simulator technology, paired with the rich experience of
Pirelli’s research and development department, which is also being utilized for consumer tires.

The simulator is produced by VI-grade and consists of a 210-degree panoramic screen, 24.6 feet in diameter, which visually reproduces a wide range of different driving conditions, roads, and circuits. At the heart of the system is a static car equipped with various active technologies to accurately reproduce the sensations that any driver would feel in a real car, including the seat, steering wheel, seat belts, and different shaker systems, which precisely replicate the movements of the suspension and engine.

The whole process is coordinated by a control room, which can program the simulator to reproduce the different technical specifications of any tire or car. The results are carefully logged, measuring the interaction between the tire and the “road.” as well as all other parameters relevant to tire behavior. This data can then be added to the subjective impressions felt by the test “driver.” The important work carried out on this simulator can be integrated with the dynamic simulator project (designed to reproduce lateral and longitudinal accelerations, as well as rotations) which will be installed at Politecnico di Milano. Pirelli has enjoyed a long collaboration with this institution, carrying out test work complementary to all the activities at the company’s own research and the development center in Milan.

Tire, Pirelli, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE,

Tire, Pirelli, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

Tire, Pirelli, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

Benefits of Electric Vehicles

Electric vehicles are evolutionary, not revolutionary, says Baker Institute expert

Tesla will disrupt the automotive industry only if it is able to achieve scale, according to a new issue brief by an expert in the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Ford vs. Tesla: What Does a Transformational Automobile Scale-up Look Like?” is authored by Gabriel Collins, the Baker Botts Fellow in Energy and Environmental Regulatory Affairs at the Baker Institute.

Ford and Tesla both earned their reputations through what Collins describes as a “revolutionary vehicle type” — the Model T and Model S-X-3 suite, respectively — and as market makers. Comparing their sales growth trajectories, Collins hypothesizes, can offer insights on how electric vehicle (EV) sales are scaling up as well as how EVs can reshape automobile and oil markets.

The modern world, saturated with automobiles, provides a different battle for Tesla than Ford faced. For Tesla, scalability is essential and “holds the keys to lasting structural change in the energy and transportation spaces,” Collins wrote. Without scale, he says, Tesla cannot compete with the legacy brands that have built off of Ford’s vision for decades. Scale would allow EVs to create the operational infrastructure that can support pure-battery EVs and become more affordable, Collins says.

So can EVs reach market-transforming scale within the next decade?

“Possibly,” Collins wrote. “One overwhelming reality leaps forth from the past decade of data and anecdotal evidence alike: at the global level, EVs have thus far been evolutionary, not revolutionary, factors in the transportation sector.

“Tesla has been ‘evolutionary’ in that the changes they have introduced to the car market to date are thus far incremental …” Collins writes. “A ‘revolutionary’ change, such as the introduction of the Model T, would cause palpable shifts on even a short-term basis. … EVs are not yet impacting the market with sufficient mass to trigger that compounding, deep, high-velocity change necessary for a revolution.”

Collins conducts a range of globally focused commodity market, energy, water and environmental research. He focuses on legal, environmental and economic issues relating to water — including the food-water-energy nexus — as well as unconventional oil and gas development, and the intersection between global commodity markets and a range of environmental, legal and national security issues.

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Founded in 1993, Rice University’s Baker Institute ranks as the No. 2 university-affiliated think tank in the world. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute conducts research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows, Rice University faculty scholars and staff, coupled with its outreach to the Rice student body through fellow-taught classes — including a public policy course — and student leadership and internship programs. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog.

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