Spirits

Ketel One Family-Made Vodka

With New York Fashion Week in full swing, Ketel One Family-Made Vodka joined with ground-breaking creative, multi-media company Visionaire to celebrate fashion artists Viktor&Rolf’s 25 years of impact on the fashion world on Saturday, September 8 at The Gallery at Cadillac House. The Dutch spirit brand, which is family-made in Schiedam, Holland, helped to mark the opening of the interactive installation, Masterclass, which is dedicated to Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren and showcases the provocative Haute Couture and avant-garde designs for which they are renowned.

Joining Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoer at the soiree were Visionaire cofounders Cecelia Dean and James Kaliardos, models Clara McGregor and Coco Rocha, and actor Michiel Huisman (“Game of Thrones”) who mixed, mingled and sipped on cocktails provided by Ketel One Family-Made Vodka, including the signature Masterclass (Ketel One Vodka, strawberry, cucumber and lime juice.) DJ Dese provided the evening’s beats as guests toured the exhibit at this SoHo space dedicated to innovation and inspiring creativity.

Photos below by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Ketel One Family-Made Vodka

(L-R) Rolf Snoeren, Founder of Visionaire Cecilia Dean and Viktor Horsting attends the launch of an Interactive Installation with Ketel One Family-Made Vodka Fetes Fashion Artists Viktor&Rolf, alongside Visionaire at Cadillac House on September 8, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Ketel One Family-Made Vodka)

(L-R) Rolf Snoeren, Michiel Huisman and Viktor Horsting attends the launch of an Interactive Installation with Ketel One Family-Made Vodka Fetes Fashion Artists Viktor&Rolf, alongside Visionaire at Cadillac House on September 8, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Ketel One Family-Made Vodka)

Coco Rocha attends the launch of an Interactive Installation with Ketel One Family-Made Vodka Fetes Fashion Artists Viktor&Rolf, alongside Visionaire at Cadillac House on September 8, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Ketel One Family-Made Vodka)

Stuttgart Beer Festival

This September, Stuttgart is celebrating a bicentennial double jubilee: 200 years of the Stuttgart Beer Festival along with 100 years of the Agricultural Show. The city will commemorate the founding of these two biggest festivals in the state by King Wilhelm I of Württemberg and his consort, Queen Katharina, with the Historic Volksfest that will start a few days before the agriculture and beer festivals. All of the merriment for the Historical Festival will take place on the Palace Square in the center of Stuttgart surrounded by the New and Old Palaces whereas the modern day beer festival and the agricultural festival, will be celebrated on the Canstatter Wasen, once a grassy plain not far from the city center.

On 28th September 1818, the day after the king’s 36th birthday, he founded the first agricultural show to strengthen and reform the region’s farming industry, which had been severely affected by the eruption of the volcano on the island of Sumbawa in today’s Tambora. This volcano had a big impact on Europe and resulted in the “year without a summer,” when gasses and ash caused climate changes leading to crop failures and famine in southern Germany.

The fact that 2018 is the 173rd and not the 200th anniversary of this merry traditional festival is easily explained: by order of King Karl, the Wasen was held only biennially from 1882 onwards, and this continued up to the king’s death in 1891. This, along with the repercussions of the two World Wars, resulted in Stuttgart having to go without its festival for 28 years in all.

Every four years, the agricultural festival still takes place and runs parallel to the beer festival on the Canstatter Wasen. These days, the LWH is the biggest agriculture and forestry show in southern Germany. This year, from 29 September to 7 October 2018, Stuttgart will again be transformed into Baden-Württemberg’s biggest farm. It will include a multitude of topics to do with nutrition, animals, sustainability and agriculture.

Starting on September 26, the Historical Volksfest will be the real draw this jubilee year as it will be a nostalgic view down memory lane for the locals and offer a unique look at Stuttgart’s past for the visitors. History will be the dominant feature of the celebratory Volksfest on Stuttgart main square, the Schlossplatz. Visitors can look forward to a colorful mixture of activities with fairground attractions and rides from times past, including jugglers, acrobats, old traditional crafts and farm animals. Two avenues will include fairground amusements that will be split up into the 19th and 20th century styles.

An exhibition showing the history of the local Swabian people’s biggest festival will take place around the Jubilee Column while King Wilhelm I and his wife Katharina, played by amateur actors dressed in historical garb, will make regular appearances. A festival tent with about 1,000 seats will be a focal point along with a dance floor, traditional dances and bands performing in historical clothes. Classical dishes of the era such as “Metzelsuppe,” a sausage soup, sauerkraut, boiled beef and fish on sticks, will be served with a jubilee beer made by the Stuttgart breweries, Stuttgarter Hofbräu and Familienbrauerei Dinkelacker.

Just two days later, the contemporary beer festival (often referred to as the Canstatter Wasen) gets underway! On the last Friday in September, the 28th of September, the seven beer tents, the two wine tents and the Alpine Village will open their doors to the public and the fairground rides will get under way. Round about the Fruit Column, the historic symbol of the traditional festival, 330 showmen, hosts and stallholders have a wide variety on offer. A double-looping roller coaster, autoscooters or Chair-O-Planes: modern attractions or old favourites – they’re all here at the Wasen. Hearty dishes such as grilled knuckle of pork, fried steak or Swabian “Maultaschen” (filled pasta) are served to go with the mugs of beer.

Canstatter Wasen is a benefit to Stuttgart’s economy not only for tourism but also for the local trades. Traders’ markets have a long tradition in Stuttgart and were part of the original foundation of the beer festival as the traveling tracers brought stayed to sell their goods. Even though times have changed, traders’ markets have remained and are a permanent and much-loved part of the beer festival on the Cannstatter Wasen. Visitors will also be given an insight into traditional craftsmen’s and traders’ markets showing old crafts, such as brush and basket making. In addition, household goods made of wood and other natural materials will be on sale.

As the second largest beer festival in the world after Oktoberfest, the Canstatter Wasen attracts approximately four million visitors including more than 20,000 Volksfest club members (former German emigrants and their families) from New York, Philadelphia and Chicago who regularly visit the Cannstatter Volksfest to affirm and renew their ties of friendship with Stuttgart. Benefitting from the festival are not the visitors but also bakers, butchers, suppliers, the service industry, the retail trade, hotels, transport companies and lots more businesses. According to a market survey, approximately 17,000 people are directly or indirectly involved in the Cannstatter Volksfest.

Chivas & Manchester United Soccer Club

The original luxury blended Scotch whisky, Chivas, has teamed up with the world’s biggest football club, Manchester United, in a three-year global partnership.

The collaboration will see Chivas and Manchester United join forces to celebrate their collective belief that blended is better – in life, football and Scotch. Just as Chivas brings together Scotland’s best malt and grain whiskies to create something extraordinary in the bottle, Manchester United brings together the world’s best footballers, a dedicated club team and a legion of fans all around the world to create extraordinary results on the pitch.

The partnership was revealed to fans in advance of the Club’s first Premier League home game of the 2018/19 season on Friday 10th August, through a film that explores the unique blend of characteristics that make up the Manchester United team. Shot in Los Angeles during the Club’s pre-season tour, the film stars an array of Manchester United first team players revealing an often unseen side to them, showing what defines who they are, both on and off the pitch.

Throughout the season, Chivas will be collaborating with Manchester United to demonstrate that blended is better – by encouraging fans to celebrate the blend that makes them unique, and showing that when players collaborate with their teammates they can achieve the greatest success.

Jean-Christophe Coutures, Chairman and CEO at Chivas Brothers, commented: “Blending has been in our DNA ever since James and John Chivas pioneered the art in 19th century Scotland. Partnering with Manchester United was therefore a natural fit; we both firmly believe that great things can be achieved when we come together – from balancing the perfect blend of malt and grain whiskies that go into our Scotch, to using the perfect combination of players’ skills on the pitch to create a winning team. We look forward to using our spirit to help showcase the spirit of the Club and its fans all around the world.”

Richard Arnold, Group Managing Director at Manchester United, commented: “Manchester United’s history is built on teamwork and we embrace Chivas’ belief that ‘blended is better.’ Our success both on and off the pitch allows us to bring together the best mix of people who help to make our Club the global name it is today. Each individual has their own skills but the way in which they blend together is what makes us a united team. It is a pleasure to welcome Chivas as Manchester United’s Global Spirits Partner and we look forward to working together to share this belief with our fans.”

The partnership will be brought to life through a 360 campaign activated across all touchpoints globally from August 2018. Chivas branding will also be displayed on digital perimeter boards at Old Trafford as well as throughout the stadium from the first game on Friday.

Find out more about the partnership and why blended is better at Chivas.com.

About Chivas

Chivas believes that blended is better, in life and in Scotch. The original luxury blended Scotch whisky, Chivas’ belief in blending was instilled by founding brothers, James and John Chivas, who pioneered the art of blending in 19th century Scotland. Since then, Chivas has been integral to the growth of the Scotch whisky category worldwide – by bringing together the best malt and grain whiskies to create something extraordinary.

Chivas believes in the power of blending in life, as well as in Scotch. In bringing people together to create a greater whole – which is why Chivas is proud to be the global spirits partner of Manchester United, the world’s biggest football club; and in blending ambition with generosity and using success to enrich the lives of others – which is why the Chivas Venture supports social startups with $1m in annual funding.

Chivas blends its home in Speyside, Scotland, with more than 100 countries across the globe, who together have made Chivas the global success it is today, selling more than 4.2 million 9L cases every year. The Chivas range blends timeless classics with modern innovation, including: Chivas 12, Chivas Extra, Chivas XV, Chivas Mizunara, Chivas 18, Chivas Ultis, Chivas 25, Chivas Regal The Icon, and the Global Travel Retail exclusive Chivas Brothers Blend.

Chivas. Success is a blend. www.Chivas.com

About Manchester United

Manchester United is one of the most popular and successful sports teams in the world, playing one of the most popular spectator sports on Earth. Through their 140-year heritage the Club has won 66 trophies, enabling them to develop the world’s leading sports brand and a global community of 659 million followers. Their large, passionate community provides Manchester United with a worldwide platform to generate significant revenue from multiple sources, including sponsorship, merchandising, product licensing, new media & mobile, broadcasting and match day. www.manutd.com

Bulliet Bourbon Tattoo Edition

In celebration of National Tattoo Day, Bulleit Bourbon launched its Tattoo Edition. The ‘Frontier Works’ campaign was unveiled in Culver City at the illustrious Smogshoppe. The venue provided guests with a sneak peek of the limited edition bottle. Hand-picked top tattoo artists, including LA’s Shawn Barber from Memoir Tattoo, fabricated designs to be showcased on the capsule collection. Over the course of the evening, Shawn painted art with acrylic onto a large canvas. Several bar stations sprinkled throughout served tattoo themed cocktails alongside of lite bites. In the background, DJ Brandi Cyrus spun top 40 hits while the signature Bulleit Woody Tailgate Trailer transformed into a photo kiosk. Lastly, Tom Bulleit the founder of the brand, gave a heartfelt speech to celebrate the series.Shawn Barber

Bulliet Bourbon Tattoo Edition

Artist Shawn Barber

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

JAMESON CASKMATES IRISH WHISKEY CELEBRATES CRAFT BEER BY SPONSORING THE 2018 GREAT AMERICAN BEER FESTIVAL

NEW YORK, NY – (June 06, 2018) – Beer and whiskey. From the classic boilermaker, to more modern pairings, they have been partners for centuries. And now, Jameson® Caskmates Irish Whiskey is further celebrating our partnership with craft beer in Denver at the 2018 Great American Beer Festival®.

Jameson Caskmates is proud to be the first spirits partner to be an official sponsor of the 2018 Great American Beer Festival (GABF)September 20 – 22 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver. As the premier U.S. beer festival and competition, GABF represents the largest collection of U.S. beer ever served. It will also feature its first ever Jameson Caskmates Barrel-Aged Beer Garden, which will include Jameson brewery partners and their limited-edition Jameson barrel-aged beer in a setting that draws inspiration from their local neighborhoods.

“Jameson is proud of its connection and commitment to the craft beer community. In 2015, we brought the two together as one with the launch of Jameson Caskmates, a one of a kind whiskey finished in craft beer barrels, and created out of a passion for craft, quality and neighborhood collaboration,” said Paul Di Vito, Vice President, Jameson, Pernod Ricard USA. “This connection and commitment to the community is one of the many reasons we’re extremely proud to be supporting the Great American Beer Festival and local brewers from neighborhoods across America.”

Brewers have long used whiskey barrels to age their beer and as part of the Jameson Caskmates Program, Jameson sends breweries across the U.S. used Jameson barrels from the distillery in Midleton, County Cork, Ireland. Those breweries age a variety of unique and neighborhood specific barrel-aged beers for sale locally. The GABF sponsorship is a natural extension of Jameson’s dedication to the craft beer community, and each of our brewery partners exemplifies a devotion to the spirit of their neighborhoods, which is an integral part of our brand story.

As a brand born in a local Dublin neighborhood, Jameson has grown up in neighborhood bars across the country with the support of the community – the breweries, the musicians, the bartenders and the people. Supporting and elevating local brewers is extremely important to Jameson, and the brand is proud to be a part of the 2018 Great American Beer Festival.

Follow @Jameson_us and JamesonWhiskey.com for the latest happenings in your local neighborhood. For a chance to win a trip to the Great American Beer Festival and join us at our Barrel-Aged Beer Garden enter at www.caskmatesgabf.com.

TASTE RESPONSIBLY

JAMESON® Irish Whiskey. 40% Alc./Vol. (80 Proof).  Product of Ireland. ©2018 Imported by John Jameson Import Company, New York, NY

Crown Royal Releases New 13-Year-Old Blenders’ Mash

Crown Royal just released the third expression in its Noble Collection, Crown Royal 13-Year-Old Blenders’ Mash, a rare stock of the Canadian whisky made with a corn-forward mash bill. Carefully aged in new, charred American oak barrels for no less than 13 years, this is the first age statement offered from the Canadian whisky brand, the world’s bestselling Canadian Whisky. The complexity of the liquid intensifies with the aging process, bringing out richer and deeper notes of caramel and fruit.

Crown Royal 13-Year-Old Blenders’ Mash was named Best Canadian Whisky and received a Double Gold Medal at the 2018 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

Browse or purchase at Crown Royal Blenders’ Mash

GGG × CINCO DE MAYO KNOCKOUT COCKTAILS

On May 5, boxer Gennady “GGG” Golovkin will face Vanes Martirosyan for an anticipated bout at the StubHub Center in California.

Whether tuning into the fight on HBO with some close friends or hosting a viewing party with your fellow boxing aficionados, impressive at-home cocktails make for an easy win. Below, you’ll find a variety of Chivas Fight Club Cocktails, complete with appropriate names, perfect for Fight Night!

GGG is the face of The Chivas Fight Club, an initiative launched by Chivas Regal to inspire the fighter in all of us. Now, more than ever the fighting spirit of this humble individual rings true as GGG continues his fight, in and out of the ring, through obstacles this year.

The Chivas Fight Club cocktails below

The Phantom Right Hook

2 Parts Chivas Extra

0.5 Parts Sweet Vermouth

0.5 Parts Lillet Blanc

Top up with Soda Water

Lemon Twist to Garnish

Glass: Collins

Method: Combine Chivas Extra & ingredients with ice cubes

The Undisputed Champion

1.5 Parts Chivas Ultis

1 Part Campari

1 Part Sweet Vermouth

Garnish: Orange Zest

Glass: Coupe or Old Fashioned

Method: Combine Chivas Ultis & ingredients and strain over one large cube of ice in glass

The Eliminator

1 Part Chivas 12 YO

.75 Part Fresh Lemon

.75 Part Simple Syrup

Egg White (optional)

Hard Ice

Garnish: Orange slice and cherry

Glass: Old Fashioned

Method: Combine Chivas 12YO & all ingredients and fine strain over ice in glass.

Fists of Fury 

1 Part Chivas 18 YO

1 Part Martell V.S.O.P.

1 Part Sweet Vermouth

.5 Part Benedictine

2 dashes Angostura bitters

2 dashes bitters

Hard Ice

Garnish: Lemon Zest

Glass: Old fashioned

Method: Combine all ingredients & strain over one large cube of ice in glass

Punch Recipe

1 Part Chivas 12 YO

1 Part Cinnamon Syrup (Homemade or Monin)

.75 Parts Fresh Lemon juice

2 parts Chamomile Tea

1 part Perrier Jouet Grand Brut

Vessel: Punch bowl

Method: Pour Chivas 12 YO over large Ice cubes

Garnish:  Grapefruit wheels, all-spice berries, star-anise pods, and grated nutmeg

Blade and Bow

This month, an extremely limited supply of Blade and Bow Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey 22-Year-Old will be re-released.

Due to the rarity and renowned craftsmanship of the legendary Stitzel-Weller Distillery, Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old is in high demand. The re-release of Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old honors the 83rd anniversary of the opening of Stitzel-Weller Distillery, which continues to stand as a true staple in American whiskey history. I’ve attached a fact sheet with all the details.

Since its release, Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old has been recognized by many respected spirits awards including:

–              Named “Best Straight Bourbon” and awarded Double Gold at the 2015 San Francisco World Spirits Competition

–              Awarded a score of 99 and Chairman’s Trophy at the 2016 Ultimate Spirits Challenge

–              Best Bourbon 10 years and over from multiple barrels from Jim Murray’s 2017 Whisky Bible

Blade and Bow will be continuing its tradition of celebrating Kentucky Derby weekend with the third annual A Stitzel-Weller Affair on May 4th.  The event includes a seated dinner hosted by chef Hugh Acheson and a private performance by well-known musician Marc Broussard.