Health

Examining Concussions In Youth Sports

A recent article by Time Magazine cited that children who have been diagnosed with depression are more likely to suffer a concussion while playing youth sports. This correlation flips a common belief that athletes of all ages are more likely to experience symptoms of depression during and after suffering the effects of a concussion.

The article is just the latest in a string of new discoveries regarding brain injuries in American sports. Researchers from across the nation are looking at different angles in order to keep American athletes safer in the future. Consider that Philly.com reported that between 1.1 million and 1.9 million children and teens are treated for concussions caused by organized sports.

These numbers don’t tell the whole story as one of the links between depression and concussions is the fact that students who have suffered from depression are more in tune with their bodies. They are more likely to document the injury and speak up about an issue.

Not reporting a concussion can come from a fear of missing a game, school or after work job. It can also come from simply not understanding what is happening to a person’s body.  Concussion awareness is just as important as the equipment being used in the prevention and proper medical care after a concussion.

The Concussion Legacy Foundation has determined that at least 1 in 5 sports-related concussions are the result of a head impact with the playing field surface. The turf is the common culprit in all sports.

It’s why GreenPlay is helping athletes at all levels become safer through synthetic turfgrass technology. Turfgrass is the term used to describe engineered natural turf on playing fields. Pristine turfgrass is proven to be the benchmark for safety and performance. Compared to synthetic turf, turfgrass has shown to produce exceptional results under impact tests to access head injuries.

Owner of GreenPlay, Domenic Carapella, explains the impact pristine Turfgrass is making for athletes across the country saying, “Turfgrass helps lessen the harsh blows to the head and body that often happen during sports activities at all levels. When it comes to what we can control, the playing surface should be just as important as the equipment being worn.”

According to Greenplay Organics:

  • It’s important to discuss the issue of concussions in American youth sports in order to help drive change for the children of our country.
  • Pristine Turfgrass is the benchmark for the safest, high-performance playing surface.
  • Turfgrass is firm to run on, provides ideal traction and is resilient under bodily and head impacts.

NasalGuard®

A Topical Gel that Reduces Inhalation of Harmful Airborne Contaminants Makes National Debut

Perfect for Flu and Cough Cold Season, Indoor Pollutants, Pet Allergies and More

Trutek Corp. announces the launch of NasalGuard®Airborne Particle Blocker®. NasalGuard is an electrostatic topical nasal gel that prevents airborne particles from entering the nose. The product is drug-free and safe for pregnant or nursing women, children, and those concerned about potential drug interactions with other medications. It is a perfect solution to guard you against the Flu/Cough/Cold and all indoor pollutants this winter season.

NasalGuard protects against virtually all types of contaminants in any location. Users can count on it to work in their homes, offices, and other environments where airborne particles may present a health hazard. The product works immediately upon application and lasts up to six hours. NasalGuard gel uses a cationic (positively-charged) polymer that creates a safe electrostatic field around the nasal passages that traps oppositely charged particles and repels similarly charged particles to reduce inhalation of most harmful airborne particles before they enter your body. NasalGuard gel can be purchased online, Amazon or by calling 855-627-2545 in a 3 gram tube for $11.85.

Every day, people are exposed to millions of airborne particles in crowded, confined spaces such as airports, airplanes, transportation centers and subways, homes and offices, hospitals, doctor’s offices and movie theaters. Using NasalGuard gel regularly will help protect against the immediate and long-term risk of breathing harmful contaminated air.

There has been a growing public health concern globally regarding the adverse health effects caused by the inhalation of microscopic airborne particles. Asthma, diabetes, lung cancer and cardiovascular disease are all proven to be linked to air contamination. In response to this widespread problem, Trutek has successfully advanced their technology which was originally focused on blocking allergens from entering the nose for preventing allergy symptoms. This breakthrough provides a greater electrostatic blocking effect that is effective against a much wider spectrum of microscopic indoor and outdoor contaminants including mold, pollen, pet dander, pollution, and virus-sized particles.

NasalGuard technology was invented by Ashok Wahi, the founder and CEO of Trutek Corp., an R&D Product Development Company. An engineer by training, Ashok was inspired to create this technology to aid his own daughter, Aikta, who suffered from severe allergies. “I developed this product because of the vital need to have some kind of personal air filter that was drug free and easy to use,” says Ashok Wahi.

About Trutek Corp.

Trutek Corp. has been marketing patented NasalGuard technology all over the world since 1995. Over 12 million tubes have been sold with no reports of adverse effects.

Follow us on Facebook @nasalguard

MIT: Liver transplant deaths reduced by 20%

Demand for liver transplants is much higher than organ supply, resulting in approximately 2,400 deaths every year. Also problematic is the current model used to identify and prioritize the “sickest” patients, which does not allow for equitable access to all waitlisted candidates, with a particular disadvantage to women. To address these issues, MIT Sloan School of Management Prof. Dimitris Bertsimas and Prof. Nikos Trichakis utilized machine learning to create a model that reduces mortality by 20%, averting nearly 400 deaths each year. Their model, Optimized Prediction of Mortality (OPOM), also provides a fairer and more equitable allocation to candidate groups, including women.

“There are many significant benefits to using this new model over the current system. Unlike the current system, which makes some arbitrary choices and results in bias against certain populations, OPOM’s methodology for prioritization is clear and understandable to surgeons — and it can save hundreds of additional lives every year,” says Bertsimas.

Trichakis noted, “OPOM fixes many of the current system’s problems because it was designed specifically for liver patients using real data. As a result, it can accurately prioritize patients across all populations without bias. This shows the potential of machine learning technology to help guide clinical practice and national policy on transplants.”

The researchers explain that the current model created in 2002 depends on the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to rank disease severity and priority for receiving a liver transplant. As certain patient populations are at risk of death or of becoming too sick or unsuitable for transplantation based upon disease progressions that are not captured in their MELD score, the system arbitrarily grants them “exception” points. While the overall MELD score has led to a more objective ranking of candidates awaiting liver transplantation, the process of MELD exception point granting has resulted in inequitable and undesirable outcomes.

More specifically, the MELD exception points policy has disadvantaged women. “Data shows that women have historically had less access to liver transplantation and have had higher death rates on the wait list,” notes Trichakis. “This is due to the awarding of exception points to cancer patients, as more than 75% of those patients are men. Women also tend to have lower muscle mass and higher sodium levels, which lowers their MELD scores.”

Using a state-of-the-art machine learning method developed at the MIT Operations Research Center and real historical data from liver patients, the researchers sought a better way to prioritize the allocation of organs. With OPOM, they asked the question: What is the probability that a patient will either die or become unsuitable for liver transplantation within three months, given his or her individual characteristics?

They found that the OPOM allocation outperformed the MELD-based prediction method in terms of accuracy and fairness. In simulations, OPOM averted significantly more waitlist deaths and removed the bias against women. As a result, it allowed for more equitable and efficient allocation of liver transplants.

“Unlike MELD, which relies on an inexact approach of exception point assignment, OPOM allows for accurate prioritization of all candidates and removes bias for or against particular groups,” says Trichakis.

Bertsimas adds, “If we use this model to change how we measure mortality and allocate livers, the death rate will decrease by 20%, which is very significant. We’re hopeful that our findings will affect the national policy.”

Bertsimas and Trichakis are coauthors of “Development and validation of an Optimized Prediction of Mortality (OPOM) for candidates awaiting liver transplantation” with transplant surgeons Dr. Ryutaro Hirose of the University of California and Dr. Parsia A. Vagefi of the University of Southwestern Medical Center. Additional coauthors include MIT Sloan students Yuchen Wang and Jerry Kung. Their paper has appeared online in the American Journal for Transplantation.

Most Embarrassing Fitness Questions

If you follow fitness trainers or enthusiasts on Instagram, we are besieged by women at the gym who look supremely confident, airbrushed and without a bead of sweat. The reality is, most of us don’t look or smell our best after a tough workout.  Not everyone is comfortable walking into a class of strangers in form-fitting gym clothes.  And what about the sounds our bodies make when we are working out?  What about those of us who want to exercise but feel we are too heavy to even begin a program?  Fortunately, we have Certified Fitness Trainer, Model Turned Fitness Expert, Instagram Fitness Guru & YouTube Sensation Vince Sant, co-founder of the online platform www.vshred.com  to answer the questions you are too shy to ask.

Why do I let out a little pee when I exercise?

Vince Sant explains that “This is very common amongst anyone who’s had a child. the term is stress incontinence, meaning you involuntarily leak out a little urine. It can happen when you exercise, laugh, or even sneeze.” First and foremost, don’t be embarrassed. Nearly every woman that’s given birth has experienced this. There are, however, two things you can do to improve stress incontinence says Vince, “Learn how to do Kegels, and practice engaging your pelvic floor in Pilates-based exercises. Both of these actions can help strengthen your pelvic floor and reduce the severity of your stress incontinence.”

Will running make my boobs sag?

 “Sag happens to all breasts that are natural. It’s normal for the collagen that keeps breasts firm to stretch out thanks to gravity, time, pregnancy, weight gain, or weight loss.” Although there’s limited research, Vince Sant says, “The up and down motion of running could logically contribute to sagging as well, but the health benefits of running definitely outweigh that possibility. If you wear the right sports bra, your breasts shouldn’t experience a lot of movement anyway. So, don’t be afraid to run!’

Why do I seem to sweat so much more than other people at the gym?

“How much you sweat is really individual, and it doesn’t necessarily mean anything positive or negative about your exercising ability,” says Vince. On average, men tend to sweat more than women, and if you are overweight you may sweat more near the end of your workout because it takes more for your body to cool itself down. Ultimately, it’s not a bad thing if you find yourself drenched in sweat while the person next to you on their machine seems to be relatively dry.

Why does running long distances make me have to poop?

Long distance running can aggravate some people’s digestive systems, particularly if you suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). But you don’t necessarily have to have pre-existing digestive issues to get some unpleasant stomach symptoms on long runs. For example, studies show that as much as 50% of runners in a 10k race experience digestive issues, including runner’s trots. It’s nothing to be embarrassed about, but there are things you can do to combat the unpleasant reality of urgent, frequent bathroom trips. Vince suggests avoiding high-fiber foods a few days before a big race, staying well-hydrated, and avoid caffeine.

Why do I tend to pass gas during certain yoga poses?

Passing gas during the occasional downward dog is extremely common. Why? You’re bending and stretching, which massages the internal organs—which can sometimes stimulate your digestion. (There’s even a yoga pose called “wind reliever). Vince recommends, limiting any high fiber snacks beforehand, and stretching before your actual class to “eliminate” ahead of time.

What’s the best way to start exercising if I am completely out of shape?

Literally just put one foot in front of the other. A Chinese Philosopher once said, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” And walking is nothing to be ashamed of. Vince stresses that “It really is exercise and there are all kinds of athletic people and celebrities in amazing shape who use it to stay that way. Get a pedometer and take at least 10,000 ‘baby steps’ a day and start improving your fitness.”

I have gym anxiety. What should I do?

There are four psychological reasons for gym anxiety: Not being sure what to do, comparing yourself to other people in the gym, feeling like people are judging you, and feeling like you don’t belong. What are a few ways to reduce gym anxiety?

Vince Sant provides some tips:

Ask friends how they feel about their own programs. You can even try to go to the gym with a friend, which is a great way to stop feeling like you’re getting judged.

Watch YouTube videos for each of the exercises you plan to do on your first day at the gym.

Wear workout clothes that you feel are both flattering and comfortable.

Pick a gym that is known for being more low key as opposed to a “meat market” or a “sceney gym.”

If going to the gym is too anxiety provoking, you can try an online fitness platform such as www.vshred.com

My Skin Chafes almost Everywhere: My Butt Cheeks, Under My Arms, Inner Thighs, How Do I Reduce the Pain?

Skin-to-skin and skin-to-clothing rubbing can cause a red, raw rash that can bleed, sting, and cause pain during your post-workout shower. Moisture and salt on the body make it worse. Underarms, inner thighs, along with the bra line (women), and nipples (men) are vulnerable spots. Vince advises, “Wear moisture-wicking, seamless, tagless gear. The fit is important. Baggy shirts have excess material that can cause irritation; a too-snug sports bra can dig into skin. Apply Vaseline, sports lube, Band-Aids or Nip Guards before you run. And moisturize after you shower. Drier skin tends to chafe more.

Am I too overweight to work out?

Forget the fancy equipment, you don’t need anything to start. Keep it low impact and rest when you need to. For example, Vince suggests the following, “Jog for 30 seconds. It doesn’t matter if you have to walk for 5 minutes to get your breath back, just do it, then jog for another 30 seconds. Do that 3 times. Then when you’ve done that for a couple of days, jog for 10 more seconds each time. Then only take 4.5 minutes to get your breath back. And as you lower the rest time, repeat it 5 times instead of 3. Keeping the overall workout time at around 20 minutes total is fine.” If you haven’t exercised for a while, the body heat, breathlessness, and sore muscles can be off-putting, but those feelings quickly become more manageable. If you have any concerns about your health and ability to work out, always consult with your doctor first.

Vincent Seth Sant

Fitness Expert & Co-Founder V Shred

Boost Your Metabolism to Speed Up Weight Loss

ILana Muhlstein, MS, RDN

Metabolism is essentially the rate in which we burn food for energy. Therefore, a slow metabolism doesn’t burn the calories from food as quickly and the excess of calories consumed will be quicker to store as fat. On the upside, someone with a slow metabolism will likely feel more full and energized from less calories and should therefor focus on filling and satisfying low calorie foods.

Cruciferous veggies like Brussels sprouts, broccoli, kale, cauliflower, bok choy, and cabbage are a great example. They are very high in fiber, which can help absorb excess fat and calories and promote elimination. These vegetables also contain iron and calcium, which and both minerals are essential for a healthy working metabolism.

Whey protein, found in protein shake powders like shakeology, are also great for boosting metabolism. Protein requires extra energy to breakdown, causing your body to burn excess calories and jolt your fat burning potential. The lean protein can also stimulate our satiety hormones and contribute to feeling full and satisfied which can prevent overeating. Whey protein also contains leucine, an amino acid, that can help build muscle, which can improve our metabolic rate, aka speed in which we burn calories.

Beans and legumes, like lentils, are amazing for boosting metabolism. They are very rich in plant based protein and iron, both essential for maintaining a healthy metabolism. Additionally, beans and legumes are rich sources of resistant starch. This starch is harder for the body to break down, meaning that it helps keep us fuller longer, can lower our blood sugar response, and encourage our body to burn more calories to break it down. The high fiber content can also help reduce fat storage in the body and improve elimination, which is very helpful for enhancing a positive metabolic system. 

 It has been studied and shown that your metabolism works about 2x stronger in the first half of the day, compared to the second half. You are eating food at the same time that you are engaged in your daily activities which is ideal for burning more calories. Even walking to and from the bathroom, or getting in and out of the car is more calorie-burning than sitting on a couch. In fact, using your brain and reading emails has been shown to burn more calories than watching TV. Therefore, the more you eat in the first half of the day, and the less you eat later at night, the better your metabolism will work. 

 

What Is Seasonal Eating?

The new year has passed and the days are getting longer in the Northern Hemisphere and shorter in the Southern.  Between cold temperatures and tremendous amounts of darkness, a diet filled with nutrients that aid our bodies is necessary.  The owner of NuYu Revolution, Susan Rappaport, didn’t start her fitness journey until she was 39 years old. She is a weight loss success story and credits her own struggle with obesity and dieting for her eventual foray into a life of fitness.

Susan notes that ‘Many of us have our go-to foods that we habitually choose to eat through the year, but our body’s nutritional needs do, in fact, change along with nature. Eating thoughtfully with the seasons will support our body’s health, energy, and can even heighten our spirits.’

She continues:

  • If we eat seasonally, consuming fruits and vegetables that nature has given us at that precise time, the result is said to be that we will feel better, more youthful, and have a stronger immune system.
  • Making food selections based on a spring, summer, fall, winter cycle, is believed to help keep the body in balance to avoid illness. 
  • Nature gives us what we need when we need it, so being mindful and selecting fresh and local fruits and vegetables is always a good choice. Seasonal food is fresher, tastier and more nutritious than food consumed out of season. Plus, it is less expensive, and supports the environment.
  • Foods grown closer to where we live are harvested at the peak of freshness, and are not forced to undergo unnatural preserving processes. A recent study found that direct-to-consumer producers used less pesticides and herbicides than conventional producers. Eating locally exposes us to many options we may not otherwise eat, which is good for our health by adding a variety of nutrients to our diets and enhances our ability to combat illness.

Like any diet change undertaking, don’t go crazy with it! There are great benefits, but if it becomes your law, you may lose sight of the benefits. If your doctor recommends that you eat more leafy greens, and kale or collards are out of season but available in your store, don’t pass them up just to “eat seasonally.” Being mindful of seasonal eating gives you a whole new perspective and puts you on a path of awareness. Do what you can, when you can, and the winds of seasonal change will likely blow you in the direction of all around better health, which is a welcome byproduct all year round!

Ideal Winter Vitamins & The Foods Where Can Find Them:

Vitamin A:

Supports our immune system functions to help ward off illness.

Can be found in:

Bell Pepper

Carrots

Collard Greens

Fish

Kale

Liver

Mustard Greens

Milk

Parsley

Pumpkin

Red Cabbage

Sweet Potato

Swiss Chard

Turnips

Spinach

Vitamin B:

Essential in nerve function, supports brain function and red blood cells.

Can be found in:

Avocados

Dates

Parsnip

Pear

Pineapple

Kale

Red Cabbage

Spinach

Swiss Chard

Turnips

Turnip Greens

Mustard Greens

Vitamin C:

Supports immune system and energy. Is an antioxidant, protects cells, improves iron absorption, promotes healthy teeth and gums, heals wounds, and strengthens the body to resist infection.

Can be found in:

Avocado

Bell Peppers

Broccoli

Brussel Sprouts

Cranberries

Grapefruit

Lemons

Mandarins

Oranges

Parsnip

Pears

Pineapple

Rutabagas

Turnips

Vitamin D:

Derived from both food and sunlight. Supports bone health, immune system, and calcium absorption. Helps keep bones strong and healthy.

Can be found in:

Kale

Seafood

Spinach

Swiss Chard

Turnip Greens

Mustard Greens

Vitamin E:

Antioxidant, protects cells, helps body process vitamin K more efficiently, and repairs muscle cells.

Can be found in:

Avocados

Certain Nuts and Seeds

Kale

Mustard Greens

Parsnip

Spinach

Swiss Chard

Turnip Greens

Vitamin K:

Supports the clotting of the blood and bone density. Protects against osteoporosis.

Can be found in:

Asparagus

Avocado

Broccoli

Kale

Nuts

Seeds

Pears

Spinach

Swiss Chard

Turnip Greens

Iron: Supports the oxygen being carried throughout the body, and promotes the making of red blood cells.

Can be found in:

Dark Chocolate

Dates

Legumes

Liver

Red Meat

Organ Meats

Nuts

Potatoes

Pumpkin

Quinoa

Seeds

Shellfish

Spinach

Squash

Tofu

Potassium: Decreases risk of stroke, lowers blood pressure, preserves muscle mass and bone density. Regulates fluid balance and controls the electrical activity of the heart and other muscles

Can be found in:

Apricots

Bananas

Broccoli

Dates

Grapefruit

Kiwi

Mushrooms

Oranges

Peas

Prunes

Raisins

Rutabagas

Spinach

Sweet Potatoes

Zinc:

Zinc supports our immune system and helps our body’s ability to ward off illness.

Can be found in:

Beans

Dairy

Eggs

Mustard Greens

Nuts

Oysters

Red Meat

Spinach

Swiss Chard

Turnip Greens

5 Steps To Effective Conflict Resolution

Conflict resolution can be hard because we often fear that the other person won’t be open to what we have to say. We may think the other person doesn’t care about how we feel, or that they just don’t have the capacity to understand. This may cause us to try to force our perspective on others or avoid conflict resolution altogether. Whether you find that you engage in frequent arguments that leave you feeling frustrated and alone, or you tend to suffer in silence by avoiding conflict altogether, these conflict resolution tips may work for you.

1. CHECK IN WITH YOURSELF.

Take a moment to breathe and notice the feelings in your body and the thoughts that are passing through your mind. Do you feel vulnerable? Are you angry? Do you feel a sense of heaviness? Don’t judge yourself; simply take note.

2. THINK ABOUT YOUR GOALS.

What do you want to achieve from the conversation? What do you really want from the other person? Be solution oriented. If you want to make the other person feel bad, things probably won’t go so well. On the other hand, if you want the other person to understand you so that your relationship will be more harmonious, then you’re on your way to effective conflict resolution.

3. SHARE YOUR PERSPECTIVE.

Here is where things become technical. Now that you know how you feel and what you want, it is helpful to be thoughtful about how you express yourself. It’s common to assume that because you and another person share an experience, you will both feel the same way about it. However, because of our unique upbringings and experiences, we all view things a little differently. In order to let the other person know you are open to hearing their perspective, it is helpful to use “I messages.” (add link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-message) For example, instead of making a statement such as “you don’t care about me”, which could make the other person feel defensive, saying something such as “I felt like I didn’t matter to you when you didn’t call to check on me” lets the other person know how you interpreted their actions and gives them space to clarify their intentions.

4. USE NONJUDGMENTAL LANGUAGE

Think about what you find upsetting and describe it using descriptive, nonjudgmental language. For example, if you were offended because someone arrived late to a meeting, don’t say something like “You were inconsiderate or rude.” Try saying, “You were 15 minutes late, and it’s important that everyone arrive on time.”

5. CHECK IN WITH THE OTHER PERSON

Ask about how the other person experienced the situation. This gives the other person a chance to share his or her perspective, which may change your outlook. Continuing from the example above, in addition to saying , “You were 15 minutes late, and it’s important that everyone arrive on time,” you can check in with the other person by saying “Are you okay? Was there a reason you were late?”

While these steps seem simple, effective conflict resolution is a skill that takes time to develop. Incorporating these tips may feel difficult at times because they may trigger negative feelings that are rooted in the past. However, If you master these steps, you will find that your conversations will become more productive and you will be well on you way to building stronger and more meaningful connections with others.

About Dr. Crystal Clements:

Dr. Crystal Clements is an adjunct professor and registered psychological assistant who practices in Downtown Los Angeles at Sync Counseling Center. She works with adults, adolescents, couples and families to treat depression, anxiety, grief, trauma, and relational issues. She loves what she does and is passionate about helping people feel good about themselves and life. Dr. Crystal earned a PhD in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in Family Studies and MAs in Psychology and Christian Leadership from the Fuller Graduate School of Psychology. She earned a BA in Communications from the University of Pennsylvania. As part of her training, she completed an APA accredited internship in Health Service Psychology at California State University, Fullerton.

Contact her today for a free 15 minute consultation!

3 Transformation Tips From Gold’s Gym Fitness Influencer

1 Set Micro Goals: Break your large goals into smaller steps. If you’d ultimately like to lose 100 pounds, start 10. If you’d like to cut out sugar, cut it out at a few meals first. If you’d like to make it in the gym 5/6 days a week over the next year, focus on making it 5/6 a week for the next month. Not only do micro-goals make your larger goals more manageable, they also give you a psychological confidence boost by achieving them.

2 Don’t Over Complicate Things: There’s keto, cardio timing, CrossFit, paleo, HIIT, classes, Powerlifting, gluten free, bodybuilding, macro counting… there are a million different buzz words in the fitness industry. Keep it simple when you’re starting out.

3 Focus on the FOUR Pillars:  There are four pillars – nutrition, physical activity, sleep, and stress. Focus on eating a nutrient rich diet that puts you in a caloric deficit (and drinking about a gallon of water), moving more than you normally would through exercise or activity, getting better, longer sleeps, and making efforts to reduce your stress. As you move closer to your goals and get a handle on those four basic tenants, you can start to focus on other variables. Nail the basics.  THEN upgrade

Genetic Immunity Presents at First Russian-Chinese HIV Congress in Moscow

Peter Boros, Genetic Immunity’s President presented the Company’s pDNA-based platform technology and clinical trial data relating to HIV in front of an esteemed gathering of HIV experts.

As part of the presentation, Genetic Immunity announced the launch of a Phase III clinical trial for the company’s lead product candidate, a therapeutic HIV vaccine, to be conducted at the Moscow City Center for the Prevention and Control of AIDS, with the planned enrollment of up to 200 patients. Upon successful completion, Genetic Immunity plans to apply for marketing approval in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) region.

“It was an honor to have been invited and to present in front of such a highly regarded group of HIV experts from Russia, China and the United States. I believe our presentation was well-received and we are all looking forward to a successful trial completion. If marketing approval is granted, our therapeutic HIV vaccine could introduce a paradigm shift in treating HIV,” stated Boros.

The DermaVir platform contains a novel plasmid DNA that encodes most HIV genes. The vaccine is administered topically using the DermaPrep medical device.

“Mr. Boros gave an excellent presentation about Genetic Immunity’s therapeutic vaccine platform with a special emphasis on the company’s HIV results to date. I look forward to completing the planned Phase III trial, and – upon a successful result – to treating patients with a very promising new vaccine product,” added Professor Alexey Mazus, Head of the Moscow City Center for the Prevention and Control of AIDS.

Tips From Dermatologists: The How-To Guide to Applying Topical Acne Medication

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States, affecting up to 50 million Americans annually. However, despite its prevalence, accurate information about acne can be scarce.

Many teenagers and young adults believe that they have to let acne run its course instead of treating it, while others turn to do-it-yourself treatments–like applying diaper cream or toothpaste to pimples– without much success. Yet left untreated, say dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, acne often results in significant physical and psychological problems, such as scarring, poor self-esteem, depression, and anxiety.

“As a dermatologist who treats patients with acne every day, I’ve seen firsthand the effects that acne can have on a person’s life, both physically and emotionally..If you find yourself in a bad mood or skipping outings with friends or family members because of acne, see a board-certified dermatologist for treatment,” says board-certified dermatologist Dee Anna Glaser, MD, FAAD, a professor and interim chair of dermatology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Today, says Dr. Glaser, there are many effective treatments for acne, including medications that are applied to the skin, antibiotics and in-office procedures. Some treatments that are applied to the skin, such as products containing benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid or adapalene, are available over-the-counter.

However, whether a person is using an over-the-counter treatment or prescription medication, Dr. Glaser says it’s important to be patient regarding results. For example, it usually takes four to eight weeks to see improvement after using a topical medication– a treatment that is applied to the skin–and once acne clears, she says, it’s important to continue the treatment to prevent new breakouts.

It’s also important, says Dr. Glaser, to follow your dermatologist’s directions while using acne medication. Particularly for topical medications, the wrong application and skin care routine can lead to dry, irritated skin.

To get the greatest benefit from topical acne medications, Dr. Glaser recommends the following tips:

  1. Use a gentle face wash. A common misconception is that people need to use a strong face wash while also using topical acne medication. However, using a face wash that is too harsh while also using acne medication can dry out and irritate your skin. Instead, look for a mild, gentle face wash that says “oil-free” or “noncomedogenic” on the label, as these won’t clog your pores. Gently as the affected areas twice a day and after sweating.
  2. Use a pea-sized amount of medication. Using too much medication can irritate your skin, and using too little can hinder results. To make sure you’re using the right amount, put a pea-sized amount on your index finger and dot the medication on your forehead, cheeks and chin. Once dotted, rub it around to cover your whole face.
  3. Ease into the medication. Since it can take time for your skin to adjust to new medication, start by applying the product every other day instead of daily. If you don’t experience any negative side effects after a few weeks, like increased burning or redness, you can start applying the medicine every day.
  4. If irritation occurs, apply moisturizer before applying acne medication. Studies have shown that applying moisturizer before applying topical medication helps prevent the medication’s negative side effects–like peeling and redness–without changing its effectiveness. Make sure your moisturizer says “oil free” or “ocomedogenic”
  5. Protect your skin from the sun. Many acne medications cause increased sensitivity to sunlight, which can increase your chance of sunburn. Before going outdoors, apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 to all exposed skin, including your scalp, ears, neck, and lips. Remember to reapply every two hours or immediately after sweating. You can also protect your skin by seeking shade and wearing protective clothing, including a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses with UV protection.

“Acne is a complex skin condition that can have many causes, including skin care products, fluctuating hormones, family history and stress,” says Dr. Glaser. “Further, not everyone’s acne can be treated the same way. If you have acne and over-the-counter medications aren’t bringing relief, make an appointment to see a board-certified dermatologist.”

In recognition of National Healthy Skin Month, the AAD is reminding the public about how to find trustworthy sources of information on skin disease, including acne, skin cancer, eczema, and psoriasis. A board-certified dermatologist has the education, training, and experience to provide the best possible medical, surgical, and cosmetic treatment to patients. After earning a bachelor’s degree and medical degree, board-certified dermatologists must complete four additional years of education, including a one year internship and three yeas of dermatology residency. Before seeking dermatologic care, the AAD recommends that everyone make sure their dermatologist is board-certified by the American Board of Dermatology, the American Osteopathic Association, or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

To find a board-certified dermatologist in your area click here.

The tips above are demonstrated in a video here that is posted to the AAD website and YouTube channel. This video is part of the AAD’s “Video of the Month” series, which offers tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair, and nails. A new video in the series posts to the AAD website and YouTube channel each month.

About the AAD

Headquartered in Rosement, Ill, the American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of more than 19,000 physicians worldwide, the AAD is committed to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair, and nails; advocating high standards in clinical standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin, hair, and nails . For more information, contact the AAD at 888-462-DERM (3376) or aad.org. Follow the ADD on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube