Health

Stress Awareness Month: Alleviating Stress and Working Out

Natalie Durand-Bush, PhD, CMPC

Association for Applied Sport Psychology Executive Board Member

Full Professor, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

Co-Founder, Canadian Centre for Mental Health, Ottawa, Canada

Recovery plays a vital role in sport. It is necessary to prevent underperformance, overtraining, burnout, injuries, and illness. This is mainly due to the fact that athletes are subjected to ongoing physical and mental stressors while training in order to stretch their performance limits. However, it is important to balance such stressors with appropriate rest and recovery through the use of periodized approaches. Periodization programs are designed and implemented in sport to maximize the effects of physical and mental training over predetermined training cycles by varying key training variables such as volume and intensity.

The aim of these programs is to maximize long-term athlete development and peak performance during targeted competitions within identified periods or ‘mesocycles’ (e.g., hockey season, Olympic quadrennial). Each mesocycle consists of preparatory (e.g., off-season and pre-competitive season), competitive (e.g., regular competitive season), peaking (e.g., playoffs, national championship), and recovery (e.g., post-competition period prior to off-season training) periods or ‘microcycles’ that vary in length based on training objectives, athletes’ needs, and the amount of time available between peaking events. Issues often arise when periodization protocols are mismanaged and training responses are not properly monitored. For example, peaking may not occur if athletes do not respect built-in recovery activities (e.g., days off, sleep routine, naps, limited social media) as a result of fearing they will fall behind their competitors. Also, coaches who insufficiently pay attention to warning signs during high-intensity periods in which athletes require more time to physically and mentally recover can jeopardize athletes’ performance and health. The costs of poor or failed monitoring could be injury or illness, including low mental health and the onset of mental illness.

Athletes’ mental health reflects their psychological, emotional, and social well-being. Athletes who are mentally healthy are able to feel, think, and act in ways allowing them to work productively, reach their full potential and goals, enjoy life, contribute to their community, and cope with normal daily stressors. When stressors (e.g., physical, psychological) exceed athletes’ internal (e.g., resilience strategies) and external (e.g., parental and coaching support) coping resources, it can deplete them and lead to significant distress and impaired functioning. In other words, it can exacerbate an existing mental illness or trigger a new one. Symptoms to which coaches should pay attention when working with athletes include any significant changes in eating and sleeping patterns, isolation from others, unusual low energy/stamina, intense mood swings, decreased enjoyment and concentration, feelings of powerlessness and hopelessness, inexplicable pain, and difficulties performing daily tasks, to name a few. Coaches noticing such changes in athletes should intervene, particularly if these changes last more than two weeks.

This entails having a private, respectful, and empathetic conversation with struggling athletes by (a) asking them specific questions regarding observed changes (e.g., “I have noticed that you look more tired and withdrawn than usual, are you struggling at the moment?”), (b) offering support (e.g., “Your mental health is important to me, what can I do to help you recover and regain your strength?”), and (c) referring them to an appropriate mental health care provider if necessary (e.g., “I’m not a mental health expert but I am seeing signs that concern me; our team has access to a mental health practitioner and I’d like you to see this person to make sure you have the resources you need to cope and get back to your normal self”). Given the crucial role of rest and recovery in the management of both athletic performance and mental health, coaches should discuss with any struggling athletes the benefits of adding recovery periods in their training program or of taking a complete break to prioritize and help them restore their mental health.

ElIzabeth J. Mayer-Davis Wins Kelly West Award

The American Diabetes Association® (ADA) will present the 2019 Kelly West Award for Outstanding Achievement in Epidemiology to Elizabeth J. Mayer-Davis, PhD. This award recognizes significant contributions to the field of diabetes epidemiology. Dr. Mayer-Davis will be recognized with this honor at the ADA’s 79th Scientific Sessions, June 7-11, 2019, at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco. She will deliver her Kelly West Award Lecture titled, “Improving Outcomes—Translating Epidemiology to Clinical Trials,” on Sunday, June 9.

 

Dr. Mayer-Davis is currently the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor of Nutrition and Medicine and Chair of the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. With research focused on the epidemiology of diabetes in youth and young adults, her body of work is described in more than 300 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. Dr. Mayer-Davis has conducted trials in type 2 diabetes prevention and type 1 diabetes treatment. She has also performed observational studies of diabetes complications and the role of nutrition. Much of her work has focused on translating research to understand clinical and public health implications.

“Congratulations Dr. Mayer-Davis, and thank you for your outstanding contributions to the important topic of diabetes research as it pertains to our youth,” said the ADA’s 2019 President of Health Care and Education Gretchen Youssef, MS, RD, CDE. “Your work has been critical to the advancement and dissemination of our understanding of diabetes epidemiology.”

 

Today, Dr. Mayer-Davis is active in the scientific advisory and diabetes advocacy communities. She served as the ADA’s President, Health Care and Education from 2011-2013, and most recently, she was appointed to the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. Previously, she was appointed by President Obama to serve on the Advisory Group of Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health from 2011-2017.

 

The American Diabetes Association’s 79th Scientific Sessions, the world’s largest scientific meeting focused on diabetes research, prevention and care, will be held June 7-11, 2019, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, California. Nearly 15,000 leading physicians, scientists, health care professionals and industry representatives from around the world are expected to convene at the Scientific Sessions to unveil cutting-edge research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. During the five-day meeting, attendees will receive exclusive access to more than 850 presentations and 2,000 original research presentations, participate in provocative and engaging exchanges with leading diabetes experts, and can earn Continuing Medical Education (CME) or Continuing Education (CE) credits for educational sessions. The program is grouped into eight thematic areas: Acute and Chronic Complications; Behavioral Medicine, Clinical Nutrition, Education and Exercise; Clinical Diabetes/Therapeutics; Epidemiology/Genetics; Immunology/Transplantation; Insulin Action/Molecular Metabolism; Integrated Physiology/Obesity; and Islet Biology/Insulin Secretion. Gretchen Youssef, MS, RDN, CDE, President of Health Care and Education, will deliver her address, “It’s All about Access!,” on Saturday, June 8, and Louis H. Philipson, MD, PhD, FACP, President of Medicine and Science, will deliver his lecture, “Precision Medicine—Addressing the Many Faces of Diabetes,” on Sunday, June 9. Join the Scientific Sessions conversation on social media using #ADA2019.

About the American Diabetes Association

Approximately every 21 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes. Nearly half of the American adult population has diabetes or prediabetes, and more than 30 million adults and children are living with the disease. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization on a mission to prevent and cure diabetes, as well as improve the lives of all people affected by the disease. For nearly 80 years, the ADA has driven discovery by funding research to treat, manage and prevent all types of diabetes, while working relentlessly for a cure. Magnifying the urgency of this epidemic, the ADA works to safeguard policies and programs that protect people with the illness, those at risk of developing diabetes and the health care professionals who serve them by initiating programs, advocacy and education efforts that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit us at diabetes.org. Information is available in English and Spanish. Join the conversation with us on Facebook (American Diabetes Association), Twitter (Amer. Diabetes Assn.) and Instagram (@AmDiabetesAssn).

 

Medical Travel Tips for Memorial Day

Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of summer.  According to AAA, more than 41.5 million Americans will travel this Memorial Day weekend by car, plane, or train. Nothing ruins a long-awaited vacation faster than getting sick or being in medical distress.  We turned to Dr. Niket Sonpal, an NYC internist and gastroenterologist for some tips on how to avoid health consequences will traveling.

Avoid Deep Vein Thrombosis

Deep vein Thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in one or more of the deep veins in your body, usually in your legs. Deep vein thrombosis can cause leg pain or swelling, but also can occur with no symptoms. For travelers, this can happen on long haul trips where you are not moving. Dr. Sonpal recommends if you are flying or on a train, to move around the cabin to get the blood flowing in your legs. If you are driving, take a break at a rest stop and walk around. Compression socks are also another option to prevent DVT.

Don’t Get Nauseous

People can experience motion sickness on virtually any mode of transportation. To combat this, Dr. Sonpal suggests Dramamine® Non-Drowsy Naturals, Dramamine®’s first non-drowsy formulation. It contains the clinically tested ginger dosage required for preventing and treating motion sickness. Other sources of ginger, including candies, gums, or ginger ale, may not contain a full clinical dose. For someone who is already experiencing nausea while traveling, it is a good idea to keep Emetrol on hand which is an over the counter nausea medication that does not cause drowsiness.

Avoid Bloating on a Plane

If you get gassy on a plane, you’re not alone! Dr. Sonpal explains that, “As the pressure around you decreases, the gas in your belly isn’t constrained as much and it expands. This can make you feel bloated or become distended.” It is essential to avoid foods that cause gas or have salt. Skip the tomato juice in flight and stick with non-carbonated water. Avoid alcohol, cruciferous vegetables, dairy and high sodium snacks such as salted peanuts or pretzels. Foods that are protein packed, magnesium-rich and high in Vitamin C are good options.

Sanitize Your Surfaces

Planes and trains are a breeding ground for illness.  The former is awful due to re-circulated air. Most travelers would be appalled if they really knew how germy their tray tables are! Dr. Sonpal suggests sanitizing wipes for your tray table, seat belt clip and hand rests of your seats on planes and trains. When you exit a restroom on a plane or train and touch the door handles, be sure to use hand sanitizer even if you already washed your hands.

Get Your Shots Before Traveling Abroad!

Before you even book your trip, make sure you’re up to date on your shots. If you’re traveling to an area where you’re at risk for picking up an illness like malaria, you might be prescribed preventative medication. Dr. Sonpal suggests that, “People should use the CDC website for recommended vaccines for travel abroad or see a travel clinic. The health risks posed to Americans vary based on the country they are traveling to.”

Don’t Touch the Ice!

When traveling to a different country, most people are very cautious about only drinking bottled water.  Many folks forget that ice is simply frozen water and put it into their soft drinks or alcoholic beverages. Contrary to what one might think, freezing water does not kill bacteria. The only way to be sure it is safe is if you boiled the water and then froze it.

Avoid Jet Lag

Even a relatively short time change from EST to PST (3 hours) can cause jet lag. With some international travel from the United States, the time difference can be as much as twelve hours. If you’re traveling east, try going to bed one hour earlier each night for a few days before your departure. Dr. Sonpal suggests that, “If you’re traveling east, try going to bed one hour earlier each night for a few days before your departure. Go to bed one hour later for several nights if you’re flying west. If possible, eat meals closer to the time you’ll be eating them at your destination. Set your watch to the new time before you leave. Once you reach your destination, try not to sleep until the local nighttime, no matter how tired you are.”

Essential Medicine/Supplies to Travel

Dr. Sonpal stresses never to check your medication with your baggage, always keep it in your carry on. Have a fresh re-fill on prescription medication with extra doses in case you get stuck at your destination. In addition, here are some essential over the counter meds/supplies to travel with:

Benadryl- For allergic reactions such as insect or bee bites.

Pepto Bismol- For diarrhea

Laxative such as Dulcolax

Anti-biotic ointment such as Neosporin

Common cold/sinus remedies such as Mucinex or Claritin

Pain relievers such as Tylenol or Motrin

Anti- Nausea medication such as Emetrol

Motion Sickness medication such as Dramamine. If you are the driver, be sure to take the non-drowsy version.

Electrolyte tablets for dehydration

Hydrocortisone cream to relieve itching from rashes, bites, poison ivy etc.

Aloe to soothe sunburned skin

Band-Aids

Digital Thermometer

Nasal Spray to prevent clogged ears while flying

Tweezers

Eye Drops

Epi-Pen if you are prone to severe allergic reactions

How to Find a Reliable Physician if you are Traveling Abroad

The US embassy in your destination country (http://www.usembassy.gov/) can help you locate medical services and will notify your family and friends in the event of an emergency. When selecting a doctor, make sure that I he or she can speak your language. The following resources provide lists of doctors and clinics that can care of travelers:

The International Association for Medical Assistance to Travelers (www.iamat.org; membership required, but it is free)

Joint Commission International (www.jointcommissioninternational.org)

The International Society of Travel Medicine (www.istm.org)

Travel Health Online (www.tripprep.com; gets information from various sources so quality is not guaranteed)

Three Exercises Most Frequently Done Incorrectly

Have you ever had a stiff neck after doing bicycle crunches or a sore back after doing a plank? It’s because you’re doing them wrong! What’s the point in unnecessarily hurting yourself while trying to work out?  Kit Rich, celebrity trainer and founder of KICHGO, says these three moves are most often done incorrectly and are also most effective because they are done so regularly. This is why it’s crucial to have the correct form. 

BICYCLE OR REGULAR CRUNCH

Potential Injuries / common mistakes:

(1) Neck – If you twist from the neck you don’t actually target the core the way you want to and put unwanted pressure on the neck which can cause pain and tightness

(2) Lifting of the hips, rocking

(3) When done incorrectly, you can have pain in your neck and back

How to do it properly:

(1) You want to think about your shoulder blades. Picture hands below the shoulder blades pushing uplifting your chest and back off the floor.  Lift through shoulder blades, twist through the rib cage.

(2) You want to keep your hips stable. Imagine hands on top of your hips keeping them still. Legs are extending without the twist of the hips. It’s a very dynamic movement when done properly it can strengthen your lower abs and obliques.

PLANK

There’s a reason people do plank all the time because it works. This exercise strengthens every muscle in the core which supports the back and hips. The plank is a great exercise because it is effective for any level of fitness or age and there are several modifications to make sure everyone can do it. If done wrong it can be harmful and quite frankly looks messy.

Potential injuries / common mistakes:

(1) Hips are too high

(2) Shoulders are over or behind wrists 

(3) No awareness of feet 

(4) The neck is dropped and the chin is tucked

How to do it properly:

(1) Hips—Picture in your mind that your body is like a table. Head, shoulders, hips, and legs are one. The idea is you can put a coffee cup on it and it wouldn’t fall. 

(2) Head—Ears are in line with shoulders. This makes sure your neck is also in line with your shoulders. Your chin is neither tucked or out, it’s neutral.

(3) Shoulders—Should be right over your wrists and it should feel like you’re lifting out of the shoulders and pulling them down your back and sliding shoulder blades into pockets down your back.

(4) Hips—Aligned with your shoulders. Make sure you aren’t overarching your back and you’re not over tucking. Remains neutral. 

(5) Legs—Strong and straight, squeezing your butt and feet are parallel with your heels right over the balls of your feet.

WIDE ARM PUSH UPS

Push-ups are always the go-to move for those who want to work out their arms. This exercise is extremely effective when done properly, however, it also happens to be one of the most common incorrectly performed moves. 

Potential injuries / common mistakes:

(1) Rounding of the shoulders

(2) Dropping of the neck

(3) Tucking of the chin

(4) Arching of the lower back

(5) Lack of engagement in the hands

(6) It can cause injury to the neck and shoulders. 

How to do it properly:

If you struggle with pushups the best thing to do is start with your knees down in a modified pushup.

(1) You want to think of your head, neck, shoulders, hips, and knees in one straight diagonal line

(2) With your arms wide, spread your fingers and push into every single fingertip equally, emphasizing your thumb and index fingers

(3) Pull your chest forward

(4) Shoulders pull down your back

(5) Belly button pulled in (without changing that shape)

(6) Bring your chest down to the floor

(7) Bend your elbows as much as you can and push back up to straight arms

(8) Be mindful to keep your neck in alignment and keep your core engaged

Scandic Hotels introduces standard for allergy-friendly rooms

Scandic is the world’s first hotel to introduce a standard for allergy-friendly rooms. This means guests booking the rooms can expect careful attention including wooden floors, and fragrance-free, hypoallergenic toiletries by the Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association. Rooms are also prepared according to strict cleaning procedures and aren’t near the pet-friendly rooms. This new standard will be a part of Scandic’s unique 159-point accessibility standard.

More than 150 million people in Europe* have some type of allergy. Most of them probably do not need specific allergy-friendly hotel rooms. But the fact is that more people are asking for more allergy-friendly options at hotels.

Scandic launched its accessibility standard in 2005. Since then, the standard has attracted attention and been used the world over. The standard has now been broadened from 135 to 159 points to include a new category with strict guidelines to meet the needs of travelers with allergies.

There’s a clear demand for the accessibility solutions we offer and we get many requests to make guests’ stays more allergy-friendly. We’ve also already seen how successful our allergy-friendly “breakfast for all” has been. Our goal now is for all Scandic hotels to offer at least two allergy-friendly rooms within a year, says Magnus Berglund, Director of Accessibility at Scandic.

During the spring, Scandic will also release an updated version of its award-winning online accessibility course. The online accessibility course was originally developed for Scandic’s 18,000 team members as an integral part of Scandic’s accessibility initiatives, since interacting with and serving guests is the most important consideration, regardless of their needs. The course is available on Scandic’s website so everyone can learn more about how to provide high-quality service to people with accessibility needs.

We’re always working to find solutions to make our hotels more accessible. While we’ve offered allergy-friendly rooms at Scandic for some time, we’re particularly proud that they’re now part of our accessibility standard. And the fact that our online course is widely used by others in the hospitality industry to improve service also gives us high marks.

Accessibility at Scandic

Since 2003, Scandic has been focusing on making its hotels accessible so they can welcome all guests regardless of their needs. Today, Scandic is the only hotel company in the world that provides information on how accessible each hotel is on their particular hotel sites at scandichotels.com. Scandic is also the only hotel company to have formulated an accessibility standard that currently covers 159 points, 105 of which are mandatory at all hotels. At newly built Scandic hotels, all 159 points apply.

Scandic also applies a “design for all” concept. Design for all means that an accessible room should be designed just as well as any other room, with smart solutions that are barely noticeable except to the people who need them

Why Whole Grain?

Whole grain can contribute to health by changing intestinal serotonin production

Adults consuming whole grain rye have lower plasma serotonin levels than people eating low-fibre wheat bread, according to a recent study by the University of Eastern Finland and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). In the study, the consumption of cereal fibre from rye or wheat was also found to reduce serotonin levels in the colon of mice. In light of the results, the health benefits of whole grain cereals may be linked, at least in part, to the alteration of serotonin production in the intestines, where the majority of the body’s serotonin is produced. The results of were published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The consumption of whole grain cereals has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. There may be effects on bioactive compounds contained in whole grains, phytochemicals and fibres from which different metabolites are produced by intestinal bacteria.

The new study explored how the consumption of wholegrain rye modulates concentrations of different metabolites in the bloodstream. The study employed untargeted metabolite profiling, also known as metabolomics, which can simultaneously detect numerous metabolites, including those previously unknown.

For the first four weeks of the study, the participants ate 6 to 10 slices a day of low-fibre wheat bread, and then another four weeks the same amount of wholegrain rye bread or wheat bread supplemented with rye fibre. Otherwise, they didn’t change their diet. At the end of both periods, they gave blood samples, which were analysed by a combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Their plasma metabolite profiles between the different diet periods were then compared.


The consumption of wholegrain rye led to, among other things, significantly lower serotonin concentrations when compared to consumption of low-fibre wheat bread. The researchers also tested in mice whether the addition of cereal fibre to the diet changes serotonin production in the intestine. The diet of the mice was supplemented for nine weeks with rye bran, wheat bran or cellulose flour. The mice receiving rye or wheat bran had significantly lower serotonin in their colon.

Serotonin is best known as a neurotransmitter in the brain. However, serotonin produced by the intestines remains separated from the brain, serving various peripheral functions including modulation of gut’s motility. Increased blood serotonin has also been associated with high blood glucose levels.

“Whole grain, on the other hand, is known to reduce the risk of diabetes, and on the basis of these new results, the effect could at least partly be due to a decrease in serotonin levels,” says Academy Research Fellow Kati Hanhineva from the University of Eastern Finland.

The researchers are also interested in the association of serotonin with colorectal cancer.
“Some recent studies have found cancer patients to have higher plasma serotonin levels than healthy controls,” Scientist Pekka Keski-Rahkonen from IARC adds.

The consumption of wholegrain rye bread was also associated with lower plasma concentrations of taurine, glycerophosphocholine and two endogenous glycerophospholipids. In addition, the researchers identified 15 rye phytochemicals whose levels in the bloodstream increased with the consumption of rye fibre.

 

Tips To Get Wedding Ready

By Beachbody Super Trainer and creator of Ultimate Portion Fix, Autumn Calabrese

When deciding on a nutrition program to follow to slim down for your wedding there are a few key things to keep in mind. The first being how much time you have till the big day and how much time you have till your final dress fitting. Once you’ve had that final dress fitting its ideal to maintain your weight so that your dress fits on the big day!

Following the Foundational Fix plan of Ultimate Portion Fix is a great way to get wedding ready.

  • Start by eliminating highly processed foods from your diet, this includes, sodas, sugary coffee drinks, cakes, candy, and any other foods you might be consuming that contain excessive amounts of sugar (anything over 8 grams per serving is high). If it has a laundry list of ingredients you can’t pronounce its go to go.
  • Stick to whole foods, things like, fruit, vegetables, lean proteins (chicken, fish, turkey, tofu, tempeh, occasional red meat) and healthy carbohydrates like brown rice, quinoa, beans, potatoes, lentils and oats.
  • Watch your portion sizes. You can overeat on healthy food as well.  You don’t need as much as we tend consume to fuel your body. Ultimate Portion Fix shows you exactly how to portion out the foods that you love with its color coded, portion control containers.  
  • Balance your macronutrients. Again this is something Ultimate Portion Fix does for you.  No counting calories, carbs, protein or anything else. Fill your containers and enjoy your food knowing that you’re getting a perfectly portioned, balanced meal every time.
  • Make water your new best friend. Water is so important to the function of your body so stay hydrated, it also helps flush toxins out of your system. Make drinking half your body weight in oz of water a day your number 1 priority.
  • Practice self care. Planning a wedding can be stressful, that stress can start to take a toll on your waistline if you’re not careful. So find ways to relax like taking an epsom salt bath, getting in a good sweat session, journaling, and most importantly getting enough sleep at night.

In addition to implementing Ultimate Portion Fix and these 6 tips, load your diet with foods that support a healthy weight.  

  • Apples not only provide a healthy, natural sweetness to your diet they are loaded with fiber to help you feel fuller for a longer period of time.
  • Avocados have a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid which provides a slow burning energy source for the body.  Its been shown to fire up the metabolism and healthy fats help you feel satiated.
  • Beans are a great source of healthy carbohydrates.The are loaded with fiber and it takes our bodies a long time to digest. This again means you will feel full longer.
  • Eggs are a great source of protein. I know they’ve gotten a bad wrap in the past but they are low in calories and high in protein. Increasing protein in ones diet has been shown as a effective form of weight loss.
  • Chia Seeds try adding these little guys to a salad or smoothie. Chia seeds have been shown to help with endurance, energy and decreasing hunger. They are also high in omega – 3 fatty acids ( a good fat that we need) and protein.  

Looking your best on your special day is a big deal and can stress a lot of people out. Take the stress away, follow a program that isn’t a diet, doesn’t leave you starving or feeling deprived, has been proven to work long term for hundreds of thousands of people.  If you want a program that is effective and will have you feeling like your best self on your big day check out Ultimate Portion Fix.

About Autumn Calabrese

Celebrity trainer, best-selling author, and working mom Autumn Calabrese has created  breakthrough fitness programs 80 Day Obsession®, 21 Day Fix®, 21 Day Fix EXTREME®, The Master’s Hammer and Chisel® and Country Heat®. She’s revolutionized the Beachbody fitness model with her simple approach to healthy eating.

Together with her chef brother, Bobby Calabrese, she authored the portion-control cookbook, FIXATETM and hosts the cooking show by the same name that streams on Beachbody® On Demand. FIXATE features simple, delicious recipes, all perfectly portion-controlled and easy to make. Her goal as a health and fitness expert is to motivate and inspire people to make the lasting changes that will serve them and their families for the rest of their lives.

Artists,Adventurers and Athletes at Hotel Joaquin

Caldera+Lab Presents Artists, Adventurers and Athletes at Hotel Joaquin

Wellness guru and mom of 2, Stacy Keibler made a rare appearance with husband Jared Pobre at  the Artists, Adventurers and Athletes experience presented by Caldera+Lab Non-Toxic Skincare for Men at Hotel Joaquin in Laguna Beach. The magical two-day beach retreat was hosted by Paul Makarechian, founder of Auric Road (Hotel Joaquin, Korakia Pensione and Lone Mountain Ranch), Pat Tenore, founder and President of internationally successful surf and skate label RVCA, Danny Fuller, pro-surfer and photographer and Sage Vaughn, California based artist.

Guests enjoyed daytime activities such as yoga, paddle boarding and surfing at the legendary Shaw’s Cove beach prior to being treated to an epic sunset viewing and cocktails by the pool complete with a live painting exhibition by Sage Vaughn. The magical evening continued with a private Mediterranean inspired dinner in the garden of Orange County’s best new restaurant Saline, prepared by famed Chef Leandro Bongarra. Post dinner, guests enjoyed a fireside performance by Hawaiian artist Lilly Meola.

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ADA’s 79th Scientific Sessions

American Diabetes Association’s 79th Scientific Sessions to Highlight the Latest Advances in Diabetes Research

World’s largest conference focused on diabetes research, treatment and care to be held

June 7-11, 2019, in San Francisco

WHAT

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has officially opened online registration for members of the media to its 79th Scientific Sessions, the world’s largest scientific meeting focused on diabetes research, prevention, and care, to be held June 7-11, 2019, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, California. More than 11,000 leading physicians, scientists, and health care professionals from around the world are expected to convene at the 2019 Scientific Sessions to unveil cutting-edge research, treatment recommendations, and advances toward a cure for diabetes. The Advance Program information outlines speakers, topics, and schedules of the five-day meeting, during which attendees receive exclusive access to more than 2,800 original research presentations and may participate in provocative and engaging exchanges with leading diabetes experts. The program is grouped into eight thematic areas: Acute and Chronic Complications; Behavioral Medicine, Clinical Nutrition, Education, and Exercise; Clinical Diabetes/Therapeutics; Epidemiology/Genetics; Immunology/Transplantation; Insulin Action/Molecular Metabolism; Integrated Physiology/Obesity; and Islet Biology/Insulin Secretion.

WHO

The ADA provides complimentary access to the Scientific Sessions to credentialed members of the media, including print, broadcast, and online media for the express purpose of gathering news and information to produce original news articles about research presented at the 79th Scientific Sessions. Media representatives welcome to attend include reporters, writers, photographers, and videographers. News organizations seeking media credentials must be members of the editorial staff, and media registration is limited to two individuals per outlet/news organization. All press attendees must adhere to the Guidelines for Press and Media.

SESSIONS

In addition to key scientific sessions and award lectures being developed by the Scientific Sessions Meeting Planning Committee, the 79th Scientific Sessions will feature results from the following key clinical trials, presented for the first time, including landmark trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health:

  • The Vitamin D and Type 2 Diabetes (D2d) Study—A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial for Diabetes Prevention
  • Longitudinal Outcomes in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes—The TODAY2 Study
  • Results and Comparisons from the RISE Clinical Trial—Adult Medication Study
  • PREVIEW Study Results—Prevention of Diabetes through Lifestyle Intervention and Population Studies Around the Words
  • DECLARE-TIMI 58 Trial
  • Once-Weekly Dulaglutide and Major Cardiovascular Events—Results of the REWIND Trial
  • The CAROLINA Trial—First Results of the Cardiovascular Outcomes Trial Comparing Linagliptin vs. Glimepiride
  • CREDENCE and CARMELINA—Results from Two Major Clinical Trials in Kidney and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes
  • Oral Semaglutide—The PIONEER Program Trials
  • Teplizumab for Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes in Relatives “At-Risk”

ADDITIONAL INFO

Scientific research will be highlighted during symposia, mini-symposia, current issues, oral and poster presentations, and Professional Interest Group discussions. The 79th Scientific Sessions also includes presence from more than 100 corporate and organizational exhibitors in over 100,000 square feet of exhibit space. For complete information on the 2019 Scientific Sessions, click here.

Beginning this year, the ADA is taking a tangible step to reduce paper consumption and demonstrate our commitment to the environment. Specifically, the ADA will no longer print the Scientific Sessions Abstract Book or on-site daily newspaper. Both will still be available through the Scientific Sessions meeting app (available free for Apple and Android mobile devices) and online.

Please send an email to the ADA Press Office: SciSessionsPress@diabetes.org if you have any questions.

Five Steps for Prevention from Watson Institute Experts

The Majority of Children with Autism Are Bullied—Do You Know How to Help?

Children with autism face unique social and education challenges that require attentive support. 1 in 59 children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Boys are four times more likely than girls to have autism. Autism affects all ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Autism spectrum disorder encompasses a wide range of challenges with repetitive behaviors as well as social and communication skills.

For students with Autism, school can be daunting, as they are faced with social interactions and not feeling accepted. Coupled with that, children with Autism are at higher risk for being victimized or bullied by peers. Nearly two-thirds of children with autism between the ages of 6 and 15 have been bullied—over twice the rate of children without autism. 65% of parents report that their child had been victimized and 50% report being scared by their peers (Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing (2009)).  

These pressures can lead to refusal to attend school, anxiety or depression, and an overall decline in academic performance. This is borne out in the high school graduation rates for students with disabilities, which is only 67.1% (U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics), compared to an overall 84% graduation rate.

Clinical experts from the Watson Institute have five tips on combating bullying among all students, especially those with autism:

  1. Highlight individual strengths. Parents and teachers can be proactive by teaching children that it’s natural to expect others to be just like us, but the things that make us different are often the very things that make us special. Make a habit of complimenting students on their strengths—including in front of their peers.
  2. Widen perspectives. Teaching children to see things from more than one perspective is a key part of developing empathy. Help children connect beyond surface circumstances to underlying emotions. If a child makes fun of a student for not being good at something, ask them to reflect on something that is hard for them.
  3. Praise kindness. Children risk being teased or bullied themselves when they reach out to a student who is being bullied. It takes courage for students to act. Turn this perceived liability into an asset by applauding acts of kindness. This can be done individually, (“I saw how you stood up for Kyle and I’m really proud of you.”) and corporately, through public recognition or incentive programs.
  4. Get involved. If a bullying situation has developed, adult intervention is usually required. Leaving students to “work it out themselves” will often exacerbate or prolong a negative situation. Involve students and parents in addressing the situation. Approach the conversation with a problem-solving, not a punitive attitude.
  5. Provide support. Children can feel a range of emotions—from fear to shame and many more—when they’ve been the victim of bullying. Don’t assume because a child is no longer actively being bullied, that the situation is resolved. Make space for them to talk about their feelings and provide any additional support they need.

ABOUT THE WATSON INSTITUTE

The Watson Institute is organization providing special education programming as well as outpatient mental health services such as social skills groups, therapy, and evaluations for children ages 3 to 21.  www.thewatsoninstitute.org.